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Category: Bike Parking

As promised, bike parking (and a lot of it) arrives at Pine Street Market

As promised, bike parking (and a lot of it) arrives at Pine Street Market

Bike parking at Pine St Market

New on-street bike corral at Pine Street Market.
(Photos: J. Maus/BikePortland)

Back in May we shared the sordid tale of how Portland’s newest downtown food destination, Pine Street Market, opened without any bicycle parking spaces.

Now we’re happy to report that not only has new bike parking arrived, but it has come in droves. There are now 36 spaces for bicycles in front of the market. There are nine city-issued staple racks (that can fit two bikes each) in a corral on the south side (Pine Street) and a Biketown bike share station with 18 racks on the west side (SW 2nd Avenue).

Bike parking at Pine St Market

We knew this dearth of bike parking wouldn’t last long.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

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Building bike parking shelters at Ockley Green Middle School

Building bike parking shelters at Ockley Green Middle School

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Parent volunteers helped erect two bike parking
shelters at a north Portland school on Sunday.
(Photos: J. Maus/BikePortland)

Did you know that you can get a few volunteers together and build a covered bike parking shelter at any Portland Public School?

We wrote about the City of Portland’s school bike shelter program back in 2012. Since then the shelters have popped up at schools all over the city. On Sunday I got the chance to help build one myself at (the newly designated) Ockley Green Middle School in north Portland. It was a fantastic way to create better bike parking at my kids’ school and spend some time with other parents.

In some ways, bike parking shelters do for schools what intersection repair projects do for neighborhoods: The thing you make together is the icing on the community-building cake.

Leading the charge for our project was Joshua Cohen, who happens to be the owner of Fat Pencil Studio, an illustration firm that creates 3-D visualizations (he worked with the city on the Williams Avenue project). His digital mock-ups of the project (see below) were very helpful in guiding us through the build. Cohen is an Ockley Green parent who also spearheaded a project at Chief Joseph Elementary School (adjacent to Arbor Lodge Park) in 2015.

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The official plans from PPS were created with volunteer labor in mind and they require no special permits.
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Looking good huh?! All we need is some corrugated aluminum for the roof and the racks (they’re on the way).
(Photo by Jeff Johnson)

Since I won’t be around to see the finished product (I leave for vacation Saturday), Joshua sent me a few images that he’s drawn up:

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Using 12 standard PBOT staple racks set at an angle, the shelters will have room for 24 bikes.(Images: Fat Pencil Studio)

Using 12 standard PBOT staple racks set at an angle, the shelters will have room for 24 bikes. (The grey in this image represents a chain-link fence around the shelters.)
(Images: Fat Pencil Studio)

Cohen has spent months working with PPS to get the final go-ahead. The hardest part was finding a location for the shelters on the campus. They ultimately agreed on a site at the rear of school in an alcove sandwiched between two buildings. It’s not an ideal location (right up front where everyone can see it would be better), but the new shelters will be a vast improvement. Currently the bike parking consists of “wave” racks (a design roundly despised by bike parking aficionados) that aren’t covered.

Working from the city’s design drawings, the shelters were relatively easy to erect. That being said, I’d recommend your crew have at least one person with construction/carpentry experience. The total cost of materials is around $1,000 per shelter and you don’t need any special land-use permit to install one. In our case at Ockley the shelters were part of a $5,000 Lowe’s Home Improvement grant.

We spent half a day with about six volunteers and were able to build two shelters. We didn’t have the roofing material and the racks weren’t ready yet, so it’d probably take a solid day to get everything done start-to-finish.

If you’re interested in doing this at your school, check out the official PPS Bike Shelter Guide (PDF) and learn more at the City’s Safe Routes to School website.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

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After beer-for-biking giveaway, eastside brewer gets new bike parking corral

After beer-for-biking giveaway, eastside brewer gets new bike parking corral

The new bike parking on SE Oak and 9th.(Photo by Eric Iverson)

The new bike parking on SE Oak and 9th.
(Photo by Eric Iverson)

Our bike parking coverage is sponsored by Huntco, a Portland-based maker and seller of bike racks and other industrial furnishings.

Portlanders who bike have granted the wish of a local business.

Base Camp Brewing now has a shiny new on-street bike corral in front of its brewpub on SE Oak and has become the latest example of bikenomics and bike-oriented development in Portland.

Last month the co-founder of the brewery, Ross Putnam, said he’d personally buy a pint for everyone who showed up by bike. It wasn’t a random promotional stunt, it was done specifically to demonstrate demand for bike parking.

Like hundreds of other Portland businesses, Putnam had done the math and realized having more bike parking would mean more — and happier — customers. He asked the Portland Bureau of Transportation if he could swap two auto parking spaces for 18 bike parking spaces. Yes, the city said, but he’d have to prove the demand was there by sharing photos of bikes parked on the sidewalk and to non-sanctioned structures like trees and traffic poles.

It worked.







The new bike parking opens up space on the sidewalk and the street — providing safety for everyone and security for bike owners.(Photo by Ross Putnam)

The new bike parking opens up space on the sidewalk and the street — providing safety for everyone and security for bike owners.
(Photo by Ross Putnam)

Over 50 people answered the call and the sidewalk outside Base Camp was jam-packed with bikes. And PBOT responded quickly as well. 13 days after his beer-for-biking Facebook post the city began installing the new corral.

“We are so psyched the corral was installed just in time for summer!” Putnam shared with us this morning. “It is in a great location for folks to kick back on the patio, enjoy a beer and be able to keep a close eye on their bikes.”

Putnam says parking space is at a premium in inner southeast these days. He’s grateful for PBOT’s quick response and says it’s likely he’ll need even more bike parking in the future.

Nice work team! Now… Any other business out there want a bike corral?

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

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First look inside the new 600-space Lloyd Cycle Station

First look inside the new 600-space Lloyd Cycle Station

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The Lloyd Cycle Station is open for business.
(Photos: J. Maus/BikePortland)

A key piece of the decades-long vision for the Lloyd District came into focus this morning when the Lloyd Cycle Station – and its 600 secure bike parking spaces – opened to the public.

We shared the lowdown on the the Cycle Station earlier this month and today I attended the grand opening. To refresh your memory this facility is part of the Hassalo on Eighth development that has arisen on a former surface parking lot on the 700 block of NE Multnomah. There are three new buildings in this development and they all strongly encourage a low-car lifestyle among their tenants. Along with an adjacent MAX light rail line and one of Portland’s best protected bike lanes (on NE Multnomah), Hassalo residents now have their choice of 1,200 bike parking spaces. Compare that to just 328 auto parking spaces and you can see why car ownership is only optional here.

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Wade Lange with American Assets Trust,
the company that owns and manages Hassalo on Eighth.
(Photos: J. Maus/BikePortland)

Before the ribbon was cut this morning, American Assets Trust Vice President Wade Lange said, “Our architects took a code requirement [for bike parking] and turned it into infrastructure that’s unparalleled in North America.”

Lange, whose company owns and manages the Hassalo project (and many other buildings in the district), said he hopes everyone who works, lives, or bikes in the Lloyd will take advantage of the new Cycle Station. It’s open to members 24-hours a day and it offers free self-service bike repair, showers (for you and your bike!), locker rooms, towel service, valet (during business hours), a snack vending machine, and even a small lounge with chairs and a television.

Portland Bureau of Transportation Director Leah Treat also spoke at the event. She said the Cycle Station reminds her of similar facilities in Copenhagen and other world-class biking cities in Europe. “We’re going through rapid growth in Portland, and people want to move here for our cycling infrastructure… This development will play a huge role in that culture shift,” she said. Treat also added that this type of bike parking is complementary to the growth in cycling that will come with the launch of bike share next month and new cycle tracks she plans to build throughout the city.

For U.S. Congressman Earl Blumenauer, being on hand at this morning’s opening was a chance to reflect on the past. As a Portland city commissioner in the 1990s, Blumenauer recalled then Mayor Bud Clark asking him, “What are we going to do with the Lloyd District?” “A few years ago this was several acres of concrete,” Blumenauer said today. The Hassalo project and the Lloyd Cycle Station, he added, “are emblematic of how we want to develop as a community.” Blumenauer said getting more people to use bicycles is a “secret weapon” to reduce congestion and to make housing more affordable.

And judging by the quality of the Cycle Station it shouldn’t take too much arm-twisting to encourage bike use.

Once you roll onto the plaza on the ground floor you are whisked underground by a glass elevator. A ramp then leads you into the entrance of the Cycle Station where glass sliding doors swoosh open automatically. You can either roll directly into the bike racks or swing by the repair station to tighten a few bolts. A foot-activated air pump is also available for use. If you need to catch up on the news and chill after or before your ride, you can plop down into a big chair, put your feet up and watch some TV.

If you don’t want to hassle with anything, a valet parking attendant will meet you in the lobby upstairs and hand you a tag for your bike that you can pick up after your visit.

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The very nice plaza above.
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The elevator to the Cycle Station.
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The entrance from the parking garage.
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Air pump for your tires that you use with your foot.
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The doors swoosh open automatically as you approach – just like in Star Wars Trek.
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Inside the men’s locker room.







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Shower stall.
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High ceilings and artwork add to the luxurious feel.
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There are touches of bike-inspired art everywhere.
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There are all types of racks, including ones on the ground that you don’t have to lift your bike up for. There are also spots for cargo and oversized bikes.
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A clean bike is a happy bike.
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Park bike and chill.
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Trevor Tompkins is one of the bike valet attendants who’s ready to park your bike for you.

Before I left I ran into Lange again. I ribbed him about the Go By Bike comparison. There are a lot of transportation options in the Lloyd District I joked, but South Waterfront also has the aerial tram so they have the Lloyd beat. “Well,” Lange quickly replied, “We’re going to get that bridge on 7th over I-84. The city wants to make 7th Avenue a bike street — just imagine going through into the central eastside. It’ll be huge!”

A grand vision of the Lloyd District as the most people-friendly, low-car zone in the entire city is alive and well.

Disclaimer: Hassalo on Eighth is a BikePortland advertiser.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

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The post First look inside the new 600-space Lloyd Cycle Station appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Portlander offers beer to illustrate bike parking demand at brewery

Portlander offers beer to illustrate bike parking demand at brewery

(All photos by Ross Putnam.)

Last Friday night the lack of bike parking at Base Camp Brewing was readily apparent.
(All photos by Ross Putnam.)

Our bike parking coverage is sponsored by Huntco.

There are two things you can never have enough of in Portland: bike parking and great beer. Especially when a friend buys the beer*.

On Friday we saw just how much Portlanders love both of those things when Base Camp Brewing Company co-founder Ross Putnam made an unusual request to his friends on Facebook:

Dearest Facebook friends, I come to you in a time of need. We are trying to convince the city of Portland to let us install more bicycle parking at the brewery. We need photographic evidence that this is needed.

Tonight between 19:00-20:00 PST (7:00-8:00 pm) at Base Camp Brewing Company I will be buying each bike 1 beer. 1 bike = 1 beer. (strap an extra to your back, double wheelie, etc.) The more bikes you bring the more beer you get, within the legal limit. I would like to see a pile of bikes on the sidewalk.

Meet on the patio. Brown plaid shirt guy (me) will give you wooden coin to be redeemed for beer.

Please share. Cheers!

And it worked! 50-plus people showed up on two wheels and the trees and signposts all around the brewery at SE 9th and Oak. Here are few more photos:

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In case you’re wondering, asking for photographic evidence of bike parking demand is standard operating procedure from the Bureau of Transportation. It’s part of the application process and it helps PBOT prioritize locations. Their bike parking corral program has been so successful that even with 140 corrals installed there are still businesses on the waiting list. It’s unlikely PBOT needed to see that many bikes to realize this is a good location for a bike corral; but we’re sure it won’t hurt Base Camp’s application.

Putnam says PBOT has been great to work with so far, he just didn’t want to wait to get the perfect photos for his application. “As inner SE continues to grow and be developed,” he shared with us in a follow up message. “It only makes sense from both a business perspective as well as personally to have as much bike parking as possible.”

Putnam wants to swap two auto parking spots for the new corral, which will have about 20 spaces for bikes. The new corral will also be located right outside the patio so customers can keep and eye on them and ward off potential thieves.

“The support was overwhelming Friday night and everyone that showed up was stoked that we are nearing closer to more bike parking,” Putnam added. “Props to PBOT for their involvement in Portland’s bike community.”

This whole episode reminds us of what north Portland eatery ¿Por Que No? did back in 2007. After making their own on-street bike parking they urged people to park bikes in the street to make the case for their new corral and gave everyone who showed up a free taco.

We’ll let you know when Base Camp’s new corral shows up.

*Note: Putnam’s offer to purchase beers was made by himself, not by his company.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

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OHSU’s Go By Bike Valet has doubled its users in three years

OHSU’s Go By Bike Valet has doubled its users in three years

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The valet in 2012. It’s co-funded by OHSU and the private bike shop that operates nearby.
(Photos: J.Maus/BikePortland)

One of Portland’s most unusual experiments in privately funded bike promotion keeps growing and growing.

With a tram flying overhead, a raised bike lane across the street, a traffic signal shipped in from Europe and a streetcar running right through the middle of a two-lane street, the intersection next to Go By Bike Valet would be one of the most unusual locations in the United States even without 378 bikes valet-parked next to it — but that’s exactly what happened May 10 and 11, setting a new volume record for the valet launched in 2012.

Powered by improvements to Moody and the new Tilikum Crossing, valet usage is up 23 percent in the first four months of this year. But it had already been growing steadily every year — and the reasons for that success are relevant to any city looking for ways to deal with auto congestion and car parking shortages.

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The valet is largely the creation of two creative Portlanders: John Landolfe, transportation options coordinator for Oregon Health and Science University, and Kiel Johnson, owner of the Go By Bike Shop.

Back spring 2010, soon after the Aerial Tram opened connecting the South Waterfront to OHSU’s hillside campus, Landolfe noticed that people had begun biking to the base of the tram and wrote an email to BikePortland pitching it as the perfect location for a new bike shop:

Landolfe says he can imagine a doctor or EMT or office assistant dropping off his or her bike at the waterfront, riding the tram up the hill, and returning to a tuned up ride on the way home. “It’d be a great arrangement for the cyclist, the shop owner, and the local economy.”

One of the people who saw our post was Kiel Johnson, a 23-year-old recent graduate of Lewis and Clark College who had traveled to Copenhagen as a student and started reading BikePortland soon after. He’d then become deeply interested in bicycles, founded something he called a “bike train” for Beach Elementary and was looking for a way to combine his belief in biking with a job that could get him through the recession.







What started as a no-frills pitch to Landolfe to operate a bike shop out of an old camping trailer evolved into a combination bike shop and valet inspired in part by similar services in Europe. Open from 6 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. and free to the public, it operates on otherwise hard-to-use space beneath the tram, which it rents from the City of Portland for $2,500 a year.

The old camper doesn’t exactly fit in with the modern lines of other buildings in the South Waterfront.

OHSU, eager to maximize ridership of of its tram take pressure off Marquam Hill’s pricey, crowded parking garages, covers some of the costs for Johnson and his four employees, and shop revenue covers the rest.

It’s also become maybe the single most iconic symbol of Portland’s bike culture, visited regularly by out-of-town officials and study tours. Streetfilms visited in late 2013 to make this video:

As of this season, the valet has capacity for 400 bikes, which will be barely enough to get through this summer if the 23 percent growth trend continues. These figures don’t include what Johnson estimates as 100 to 150 non-valet bike parking spaces near the tram, which are frequently full.

I asked Johnson why he thought valet usage keeps rising.

“Everybody who rides the tram has to go over and see all those bikes parked there, and at least for a moment every day, think about, Oh, it’s so cool that all these people ride their bikes. Maybe I should do that too.
— Kiel Johnson, Go By Bike owner

“I think a lot of it has to do with the city’s investment on Moody and the bridge,” he said. “And I think there’s something also to just not having to worry about repairs. You know, if you get a flat tire, there’s somebody there who can fix it for you on the spot. And we probably see between two and five flat tires every day. That’s two and five people who if there wasn’t a bike shop right there would be like, riding a bike sucks and I have to figure out how to get me and my bike with a flat tire home.

“And I think that it’s just becoming a lot more sort of socially normal at OHSU to ride your bike to work,” Johnson went on. “I think the valet is very visible advertisement that everybody who rides the tram has to go over and see all those bikes parked there, and at least for a moment every day, think about, Oh, it’s so cool that all these people ride their bikes. Maybe I should do that too.

(Video by Johnson, who obviously thinks they should do that too.)

— Michael Andersen, (503) 333-7824 – michael@bikeportland.org

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The post OHSU’s Go By Bike Valet has doubled its users in three years appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Nowhere to park your bike at Pine Street Market? Help is on the way

Nowhere to park your bike at Pine Street Market? Help is on the way

A new market in downtown Portland without bike parking out front? The horror!(Photo: J. Maus/BikePortland)

A new market in downtown Portland without bike parking out front? Say it ain’t so!
(Photo: J. Maus/BikePortland)

Downtown Portland’s most interesting new meal spot could be described as an indoor food cart pod, or maybe a slightly upmarket food court.

But whatever you want to call Pine Street Market, one thing it’s clearly short of is bike parking.

A few weeks ago, when I met a friend there, I resorted to something I’ve never had to do since moving to Portland: locking my bike to the plumbing outside a nearby building.

This is such an odd situation in Portland, which usually excels at commercial bike parking above all else, that it’s been drawing attention:







So we asked the city’s bike parking team what was up. City spokesman John Brady replied on Thursday, saying that instead of adding their own on-site bike parking, Pine Street Market opted for the alternative in city code: paying into the city bike parking fund.

“Usually this would mean the installation of racks on the sidewalk,” Brady wrote in an email. “That didn’t happen in this case because we knew there would be a number of restaurants with café seating. So we are currently working with the building management to install a bike corral. There is also a BIKETOWN station slated for the area. Planning and phasing that mix of on-street bike storage is taking some time.”

So if you’ve got a yen for Israeli street food, bahn mi, fancy soft-serve ice cream, Mexican tapas, or Chicago-style hot dogs, grin and bear with the temporary parking problems. After all, this is what car drivers are choosing to deal with most of the time.

— Michael Andersen, (503) 333-7824 – michael@bikeportland.org

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Portland’s biggest, baddest bike parking facility is about to open

Portland’s biggest, baddest bike parking facility is about to open

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Inside the Lloyd Cycle Station, where you can catch a game on the tube while you chill after a ride.
(Photos: M.Andersen/BikePortland unless noted)

Generally speaking, Portland does bike parking better than any city in North America. And one of the continent’s biggest bike parking projects is about to open in the middle of it.

The Lloyd Cycle Station, which opens to the public next month in the basement of the Lloyd 700 Building at 700 NE Multnomah Street, will offer half of the record-breaking 1,200 indoor bike parking spaces constructed as part of Hassalo on Eighth in the Lloyd District. But unlike most residential bike parking projects, this facility will also be open to people who work or shop in the area.

The 24-hour facility will offer service from on-site mechanics, paid lockers, showers, a bike-repair stand, extra-large cargo bike parking, a bike wash and free “commute consultations.”

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The facility seen here through a window from the top garage elevator lobby of the Lloyd 700 Building.
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Doors to the locker room facility.
(Photo: Hassalo on Eighth)
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(Photo: Hassalo on Eighth)

Full memberships will cost $50 a month or $419 a year. For business tenants of the Lloyd 700, it’ll be $35 a month, $320 per year.

You don’t have to buy a full membership, though. Simply parking your bike in the Cycle Station will cost $119 a year for nontenants of the 700 Building, $20 a year for tenants; or if you just want shower access without bike parking, that’s $200 a year. Here’s the full fee schedule:

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This means that for residents of Hassalo on Eighth, a basic bike parking membership at the Cycle Station ($15/month) will be cheaper than bike parking inside the Hassalo on Eighth residential buildings ($25/month). That’s great news for Hassalo residents — it’ll prompt occasional bike users to stash their rides in the Cycle Station and keep the highest-convenience rooms open for people who ride daily.

“We’ve actually had a lot of people call to sign up, because they have many bikes,” said Kathryn Doherty-Chapman of Go Lloyd, the local business association that has partnered with Hassalo on Eighth to administer the Cycle Station.





So if you become a member, how will you reach the facility in the top floor of the three-level underground garage? There are two options.

“I recommend people use the plaza elevator,” said Doherty-Chapman. “It’s just an elevator built for people, but it easily fits a cargo bike or a longtail bike.”

The plaza elevator opens directly into the car-free plaza on Hassalo Street, opening onto 7th Avenue.

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Both of these elevators lead to your bicycle parking, madam.

The other way is to use the elevator inside the 700 building, but it’s closed to the public after 6 p.m. and more heavily used in any case.

There’s also another way to use the Cycle Station even if you’re not a member: starting some time after the opening day in June, the 700 Building will offer a free short-term bike valet during business hours.

“If you’re here for an appointment or you’re running into Green Zebra, then you’ll just roll up,” Doherty-Chapman said.

The valet, operated by Ace Parking, will only be available during business hours. But it’ll be free to anyone who wants to use it.

Go Lloyd is hosting a grand opening celebration for the Cycle Station on Wednesday, June 1, at 10 a.m. on June 1, with guest speakers, a ribbon-cutting and snacks from nearby Green Zebra Grocery.

Though the Cycle Station obviously won’t be for everyone, it’s worth taking a moment to savor this milestone: one of the country’s best bike parking facilities is opening to the public in Portland and operating more or less as a business, planning to make money by giving hundreds of people a place to park their bicycles.

Governments can mandate bike lanes, bike parking and even bike programming. But when private businesses get in on the bike game, biking isn’t just an aspiration or an ideology. It’s a reality.

Disclosure: Hassalo on Eighth is a BikePortland sponsor. The opening of one of North America’s largest indoor bike parking facilities would also be newsworthy if they weren’t.

— Michael Andersen, (503) 333-7824 – michael@bikeportland.org

The Real Estate Beat is a regular column. You can sign up to get an email of Real Estate Beat posts (and nothing else) here, or read past installments here.

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How Portland’s oldest Buddhist temple got better bike parking

How Portland’s oldest Buddhist temple got better bike parking

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Charles Reneau and the bike parking area he made happen.
(Photos: J. Maus/BikePortland)

Making a place more welcoming to bicycle riders often starts with parking. It’s a basic need for all vehicle users. In the central city you can usually find a staple rack or something else to lock up to; but head out into Portland’s neighborhoods, beyond the main commercial districts, and it’s another story.

Take the Oregon Buddhist Temple for example. Since their attractive building on Southeast 34th just south of Powell Boulevard opened in 1966, members have had no place to park a bicycle. That fact bothered temple member Charles Reneau, so when he got a seat on the board he decided to do something about.

“It’s one more little thing that welcomes them to our temple.”
— Charles Reneau, Oregon Buddhist Temple

I met Reneau outside the temple on Monday. He’s been a member since 2008. “I just live about four or five blocks from here,” he said, as we looked out over the large surface parking lot adjacent to the temple. “So of course I ride my bike.” Unfortunately though, since there are no city-supplied staple racks on the sidewalk out front (the city said it’s too narrow) and it’s not polite to lock to the decorative railings, Reneau would lock up to a gas line pole on the other side of the lot. “I ride every week, so when I got on the board I realized I needed to make this happen”.

The “this” Reneau referred to was a bike parking area.

About a year ago he brought the idea to the temple’s board. None of them rode bikes so they’d never event thought about before. Even so, they were supportive — as long as Reneau promised to lead the charge. And he did.

To Reneau, a lack of bike parking was more than just a personal inconvenience. “I thought, this was an amenity we needed to provide to show we’re engaged with the community not just symbolically, but physically as well.” He went to work with a few other volunteers, one of whom was a contractor. The project began back in August.






They scoped out a space along the side wall of the temple. One of the board members felt it should be behind the building, but Reneau knew better. From reading BikePortland he’d learned that bike parking must be obvious and visible for people who want to use it and for those who it might inspire. The space was bare dirt so they had to dig down a bit and clear out a pad that’s about seven feet deep by twenty feet wide. They poured concrete and bolted in three staple racks (purchased from Portland-based Huntco).

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The racks are well-spaced and provide plenty of breathing room for unloading kids or cargo. They left extra room in case they want to add more staples in the future.

The project only took a few days to complete and it “wasn’t that hard.” Reneau said the total cost was about $2,000 for everything including the concrete, rebar and the racks.

Reneau is proud of his bike parking. He thinks it strengthens the temple’s “sangha” or community. “When someone stops to take a look and sees that we have parking for bicycles, it’s one more little thing that welcomes them to our temple.”

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

Our coverage of bike parking is sponsored by Huntco. If you have a story idea, or would like us to visit the bike parking at your business, please get in touch.

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The post How Portland’s oldest Buddhist temple got better bike parking appeared first on BikePortland.org.

West-side group wants advice about bike parking locations in the burbs

West-side group wants advice about bike parking locations in the burbs

The (Epic) Sushi Ride

The suburbanite’s familiar search.
(Photo: J.Maus/BikePortland)

BikePortland’s bike parking coverage is sponsored by Huntco Site Furnishings.

Suburban parking lots often fail horribly at bike parking — not because it’s expensive but simply because developers weren’t thinking about it.

But as hundreds of Portland retailers can testify, decent bike parking is a big part of making a business district bike-friendly. It’s a key part of making it feel natural and normal to go out for an errand, a beer, a meeting, a movie or a daycare dropoff on a bicycle.

With low-car lifestyles getting more common in Washington County over the last few years, some people in the area are looking to upgrade the bike parking. That’s why the Westside Transportation Alliance is working on a project right now to select the best locations for new bike racks.

The effort in the Aloha-Reedville area, just west of the Beaverton city limits, came out of a 2014 report by Washington County that named retrofitting bicycle parking as one of the changes needed to make the area more bike-friendly.





It also comes on the heels of a very nice guide to installing suburban bike parking, created by the WTA.

Now, the WTA has created an online map where they’re soliciting suggestions on where bike parking should go. To add your own suggestions, you can click the “edit” icon in the upper left, then tap the purple pin, then tap a desired location.

aloha bike parking

It’s not the slickest website ever — I was unable to add comments to a demo pin I submitted — but it’s a chance to have some real influence if you know the area. WTA is eager for suggestions on where bike parking should go.

WTA Business Relations Manager Ross Peizer writes that he’d love to get it in front of anyone “who might live or pass through/visit Aloha-Reedville and have ever said ‘such and such place could use a bike rack.’”

— Michael Andersen, (503) 333-7824 – michael@bikeportland.org

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The post West-side group wants advice about bike parking locations in the burbs appeared first on BikePortland.org.