Browsed by
Category: Bike Theft

Bike shop offers $500 reward for return of rare, stolen e-trike

Bike shop offers $500 reward for return of rare, stolen e-trike

Owner of RecumbentPDX says the stolen trike is one of only 12 or so on the entire west coast.

An rare electric-assist recumbent trike was stolen in downtown Portland over the weekend. It belongs to someone who is physically disabled. Mel Birgé, owner of RecumbentPDX in southeast Portland, is offering $500 for its return.

Here’s more from Mel:

An HP Scorpion Plus Pedelec was stolen. It looks virtually-identical to the one in the attached picture (the stolen one is tan color and has a larger 26” wheel in the rear). The trike has a Go SwissDrive electric motor in the rear wheel.

The owner is disabled by a brain tumor and this is his primary recreation.








Please support BikePortland.

RPDX is offering a $500 for its return –no questions asked (we’ll happily bump that to $1000 if the thief is caught and successfully prosecuted!)

Here’s are a couple videos of a virtually-identical Scorpion Plusses to aid in identification: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=euCGHFer4m4 and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZB86SgzadLs

This is a rare trike – likely aren’t more than a dozen on the entire west coast and it’s easily recognized.

Mel has filed a police report.

If you have seen this bike or know anything about its theft, please contact the police non-emergency line at (503) 823-3333 or contact us and we’ll connect you.

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org

BikePortland is supported by the community (that means you!). Please become a subscriber or make a donation today.





The post Bike shop offers $500 reward for return of rare, stolen e-trike appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Police surprise Craigslist seller to help woman get her stolen bike back

Police surprise Craigslist seller to help woman get her stolen bike back

The Craigslist post (still up as of today) said the bike was, "Recently bought for me as a gift but I'm not much into bicycle riding."

The Craigslist post (still up as of today) said the bike was, “Recently bought for me as a gift but I’m not much into bicycle riding.”

Northwest Portland resident Tina Penman is feeling very grateful for the Portland Police Bureau today. After her bike got stolen on Monday she set up a Craiglist sting with an officer who rolled up just in time to bust the thief.

In the interest of educating others about how to prevent and recover a stolen bike, we asked Tina to share how it all went down. Here’s her story…

With the rain and winds late last week into this past weekend, I took a 5-day hiatus from riding my bike. On Monday night, I popped down to my building’s private courtyard to say hi (who doesn’t miss their bike after a 5-day hiatus?) and see how it was doing. I live in an apartment complex in the Pearl and you need a fob to gain access to this area. To my unpleasant surprise, it was no longer there. I had it locked using a Kryptonite Chain Combination Lock in a well-lit area next to two other bikes (one was my husband’s) that remain unscathed.

I immediately hit up my husband and a couple friends to ask for advice. My bike had a Tile tracker attached to seat and I wasn’t sure how it would work in a situation where my bike could be anywhere. Tile utilizes a Bluetooth connection so you have to be in very close proximity for an item with a Tile attached to be found. I hopped in a Zipcar, drove real slow around some popular camps in PDX in hopes my Tile app would capture my bike, but no such luck. After driving around for an hour, I realized it was like searching for a needle in a haystack so I called it quits and went home.

All safe and sound, minus a few accessories. But strangely the thief cleaned it up and added a new saddle.(Photos: Tina Penman)

All safe and sound, minus a few accessories. But strangely the thief cleaned it up and added a new saddle.
(Photos: Tina Penman)

When I got home, I hopped on Craigslist just for kicks to see if it was being sold. To my surprise, I actually found it in a Craigslist post. The pictures showed my bike, down to the details of the bike frame sticker, the spoke reflectors I use for visibility (obnoxious, I know), and even the bike mounts I have on my dropdowns for my front lights. I got nervous and my heart was beating so fast! I knew time was of the essence because this bike could be sold and I’d never see it again. I immediately posted in the BTA Women Bike Facebook group asking for advice. It was late on Monday night, my husband was not yet home from work, and I was afraid to use my own phone number to call the Craigslist poster. I have a traceable social media footprint so I did not want to spook the Craigslist poster into knowing that I was actually the owner of this bike.

The Facebook group and a couple friends encouraged me to call Portland Police Bureau, who said they would send out an officer. As I waited for the officer, I downloaded all relevant photos of my bike, including two photos I had of my bike’s serial number on the bottom part of the frame. I also had photos of my bike and me with my bike. Luckily, I had also registered my bike on Project 529 which is free and also includes the serial number registration and proof I had previously registered in September 2015. All of my evidence was gathered and I retroactively filed an online police report for stolen property.







The officer from Portland Police Bureau arrived and I showed him all of my evidence. At this point it was 11:30PM, but we decided to send a text anyway. We texted using the officer’s phone and we received a response from the Craigslist poster. They stated they were going to bed, but still had the bike. We then asked if we could see it the next morning, but we didn’t hear back (they probably fell asleep). The officer was working night shift, so he told me a daytime officer could help with the next steps the following morning.

Yesterday morning, I woke up and did not hear from the officer. At that point, he had already been off duty for a couple hours so I knew I was starting from scratch again. Taking a risk, I texted the Craigslist poster from my phone. Than an hour later I left a voicemail. We also texted from my husband’s phone. Four hours later (felt like an eternity), I finally heard back. I was so worried my bike had been sold. Turns out it had not, whew! Over the course of a couple texts throughout the rest of the day (again, feeling like an eternity), we arranged a time and place to meet.

About 45 minutes prior to meeting, I called Portland Police Bureau to update the online police report and to request officer presence for this exchange. A couple minutes later, an officer called me back to ask for the details. I told her where and when we would be meeting and she requested I call her as soon as I saw the Craigslist poster and the bike, even if I wasn’t able to talk. That would be her cue to pull up to our meeting location.

As I turned the corner and walked up to our meeting location, I saw my bike against the wall and the Craigslist poster smoking a cigarette. Immediately I could tell the seat had been swapped out, a rear reflector had been added, and my bike was shiny and clean! That said, a couple things were also removed – my light mounts, my bell, water holders, and my fenders.

I was nervous! The poster suggested we look at the bike in a garage attached to the building about 10 feet away and I respectfully declined, realizing this poster wasn’t the innocent third party I thought they were. I discreetly called the officer’s phone number to send the signal. Then, I stalled asking questions, testing out the brakes, and standing over the frame. I was nervous that the officer might get delayed or may not show up, but PPB came through and timing was perfect! About 30 seconds later, the officer pulled up and revealed that the bike was stolen property, and that it did in fact, belong to me. The officer told me I was free to go.

As much as I would have loved to linger and see what happened, I was still going on adrenaline and still very nervous, so I got out of there as fast as I could!

As I was walking home (I was still nervous and didn’t want to ride home yet- also the seat was a little too high), the officer called me back and thanked me for calling it in. It was a very classy move and I am so thankful for PPB!

theft-bike

Tina is lucky, but she created her luck by doing several things right: Contacting the police, registering her bike before it was stolen, and having photographic proof of ownership.

So what are you waiting for? Go register your bike and snap some photos right now! We recommend using Project 529 and/or Bike Index.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

BikePortland is supported by the community (that means you!). Please become a subscriber or make a donation today.

The post Police surprise Craigslist seller to help woman get her stolen bike back appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Forced to steal, a Cedar Hills teen turns in her mom and gets a new bike

Forced to steal, a Cedar Hills teen turns in her mom and gets a new bike

This duo was arrested on multiple charges.(Photos: Multnomah County Sheriff's Office)

This duo was arrested on multiple charges.
(Photos: Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office)

We’ve covered many bike theft stories over the years; but we’ve never heard of anything quite like what we learned from the Washington County Sheriff’s Office this morning.

A 13-year-old girl in Cedar Hills (seven miles west of Portland) called the police to report a bicycle that she suspected was stolen. The amazing thing is that the bike was given to her by her mother and she told the responding officer it was probably stolen. She was right. She also disclosed that her mom had forced her to steal all sorts of things from apartment complexes and donation drop-off locations.

Deputies investigated and found out that the girl’s mom — 33-year-old Beaverton resident Lara Kent and her partner, 37-year-Jack Harman Jr. from Portland — had a U-haul van and a storage unit stuffed with stolen goods. They tracked down the van and the storage unit and ultimately arrested the duo.

Among the 70 stolen items recovered were jewelry, checks, mail, license plates, new clothing, 10 bicycles and one electric scooter that belonged to Portlander Cheryl Evans.









Cheryl Evans and a Washington County Sheriff's deputy with the 13-year-old girl and her new bike.

Cheryl Evans and a Washington County Sheriff’s deputy with the 13-year-old girl and her new bike.

When Evans showed up to recover her scooter, she heard how the young girl was caught up with criminals and was put into this terrible situation. “After hearing of the circumstances,” reads a statement from the Sheriff’s office, “Ms. Evans told deputies she wanted to purchase the girl a bicycle since she no longer had one. Ms. Evans cited she came from a difficult childhood and understands doing the right thing can sometimes be difficult, especially when family is involved.”

Yesterday the investigating deputies, Ms. Evans, and the girl went to the store and picked out a brand new bike. Thanks to her own generosity and some donations from friends, Evans bought her and younger brother a bike. And of course two strong u-locks.

We loved the last line of the Sheriff’s office statement: “We would like to thank Ms. Evans and the 13-year-old girl for demonstrating the Washington County Sheriff’s Office core values: do your best, do the right thing, and treat others the way you want to be treated.”

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

BikePortland is supported by the community (that means you!). Please become a subscriber or make a donation today.

The post Forced to steal, a Cedar Hills teen turns in her mom and gets a new bike appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Bike Theft Task Force helps nab ‘prolific’ garage burglar

Bike Theft Task Force helps nab ‘prolific’ garage burglar

David Dutcherson.(Photo: PPB)

David Dutcherson.
(Photo: PPB)

The Portland Police Bureau has nabbed another big-time thief who has a taste for high-end bicycles.

The PPB worked with officers from the Bike Theft Task Force and task force partner BikeIndex.org to arrest Joshua Dutcherson last Thursday. The 32-year-old suspect is being held in connection with three burglaries of apartment complex garages where he’s accused of lifting “numerous bicycles.”

Here’s how it went down, via the official police statement about the case:

The Bike Index website (https://bikeindex.org/) was instrumental in identifying some of the stolen bikes. An off-duty detective saw a suspicious van with three high end racing bikes the week prior and took note of the plate and the driver. While officers were investigating some new bike thefts the detective recognized the suspect and the vehicle as the same one he had seen a week prior…

Dutcherson is believed to have burglarized several locations in Southeast Portland to steal bicycles and re-sell them online. Dutcherson is suspected of breaking into locations in the 2600 block of Southeast Ankeny Street, the 1300 block of Southeast Umatilla Street and the 1600 block of Southeast Harold Street.

Detectives recovered three stolen bikes from Dutcherson who had already sold them to unsuspecting buyers. Detectives were able to locate the bikes and returned them to their rightful owners.







Dutcherson was booked into Multnomah County Jail on four counts of Burglary in the First Degree, three counts of Theft in the First Degree, Possession of Heroin, and Theft in the First Degree by Receiving. Dutcherson had outstanding warrants and was on probation for burglary when he was arrested.

This arrest is the result of closer coordination between the Police Bureau and members of the Bike Theft Task Force which includes Bryan Hance from Bike Index and is spearheaded by PPB Officers Dave Bryant and Dave Sanders. One of the major fronts of recent battles has been OfferUp, an online marketplace that’s an alternative to Craigslist and eBay. OfferUp and the Bike Theft Task Force have been actively working together to crack down on bike thieves — and it looks like these efforts are starting to pay off.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

BikePortland is supported by the community (that means you!). Please become a subscriber or make a donation today.

The post Bike Theft Task Force helps nab ‘prolific’ garage burglar appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Bike Theft Task Force helps nab ‘prolific’ garage burglar

Bike Theft Task Force helps nab ‘prolific’ garage burglar

David Dutcherson.(Photo: PPB)

Joshua Dutcherson.
(Photo: PPB)

The Portland Police Bureau has nabbed another big-time thief who has a taste for high-end bicycles.

The PPB worked with officers from the Bike Theft Task Force and task force partner BikeIndex.org to arrest Joshua Dutcherson last Thursday. The 32-year-old suspect is being held in connection with three burglaries of apartment complex garages where he’s accused of lifting “numerous bicycles.”

Here’s how it went down, via the official police statement about the case:

The Bike Index website (https://bikeindex.org/) was instrumental in identifying some of the stolen bikes. An off-duty detective saw a suspicious van with three high end racing bikes the week prior and took note of the plate and the driver. While officers were investigating some new bike thefts the detective recognized the suspect and the vehicle as the same one he had seen a week prior…

Dutcherson is believed to have burglarized several locations in Southeast Portland to steal bicycles and re-sell them online. Dutcherson is suspected of breaking into locations in the 2600 block of Southeast Ankeny Street, the 1300 block of Southeast Umatilla Street and the 1600 block of Southeast Harold Street.

Detectives recovered three stolen bikes from Dutcherson who had already sold them to unsuspecting buyers. Detectives were able to locate the bikes and returned them to their rightful owners.







Dutcherson was booked into Multnomah County Jail on four counts of Burglary in the First Degree, three counts of Theft in the First Degree, Possession of Heroin, and Theft in the First Degree by Receiving. Dutcherson had outstanding warrants and was on probation for burglary when he was arrested.

This arrest is the result of closer coordination between the Police Bureau and members of the Bike Theft Task Force which includes Bryan Hance from Bike Index and is spearheaded by PPB Officers Dave Bryant and Dave Sanders. One of the major fronts of recent battles has been OfferUp, an online marketplace that’s an alternative to Craigslist and eBay. OfferUp and the Bike Theft Task Force have been actively working together to crack down on bike thieves — and it looks like these efforts are starting to pay off.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

BikePortland is supported by the community (that means you!). Please become a subscriber or make a donation today.

The post Bike Theft Task Force helps nab ‘prolific’ garage burglar appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Bike Theft Task Force officers host ride-along on the Springwater Corridor

Bike Theft Task Force officers host ride-along on the Springwater Corridor

Officers Dave Sanders (right) and Ben Labasan on the Springwater Path Saturday.(Photos: Portland Police Bureau)

PPB Officers Dave Sanders (right) and Ben Labasan on the Springwater Path Saturday.
(Photos: Portland Police Bureau)

Leaders of the Portland Police Bureau’s Bike Theft Task Force did a ride-along on the Springwater Corridor path on Saturday.

The ride was a spontaneous event that founder of the Task Force, PPB Officer Dave Sanders, posted to Twitter just a few hours before he set out. He was joined by fellow Officer Ben Labasan and the two of them were joined by a handful of citizens who showed up to ride with them. It was all part of the Bike Theft Task Force’s ongoing effort to involve the community in the work they are doing to prevent bike theft and recover stolen bikes.

Why the Springwater? “I’ve been wanting to see the issues along the Springwater firsthand and have been wanting to address some of the ongoing tips and complaints that we have received regarding bike theft in this area,” Ofcr Sanders said via email this morning.

Here’s more from Sanders:

My hope was to allow the community to be involved in navigating some of their concerns/problems that present themselves along the corridor. I wanted to be able to listen to these concerns on a deeper level and to allow the community see first-hand how we follow up on these bike-theft related complaints and the challenges that we are sometimes faced with. Some folks who offer up these bike theft tips/complaints sometimes feel that these go into a black hole and are not addressed, so I wanted to encourage the public that we do take these seriously and address them as we are able. I believe that the community’s involvement in stopping bike theft is crucial and we are never going to get a handle on it if we can’t come together on this as a larger community.







Recovered bike found along the Springwater path.

Recovered bike found along the Springwater path.

bttf-bikeframepile

The officers found lots of parts, but didn't see any high-end or complete bikes.

The officers found lots of parts, but didn’t see any high-end, complete bikes.

Beyond the community-building, the ride led to results. Within a few hours the officers recovered a nice new Public road bike. Sanders and Labasan were excited to recover that bike, but wish they could have run serial numbers on the “hundreds” of other bikes that looked suspicious. “We weren’t able to address many of the bikes we saw,” he wrote, “but tried to follow up on the ones that we thought may be reported/registered and were in decent condition.” Sanders said there was one trove of bikes in particular that he wanted to check out but was unable to due to a “very aggressive dog” that was guarding the area.

While he was dismayed at the conditions he saw along the path, Sanders was encouraged to see so many people out riding. “We received dozens of positive comments on Saturday and many expressed appreciation for being out on the trail,” he wrote. “I wish we could be out there riding every day. I can say, after riding the trail, I understand more deeply the legitimate concerns that are presented by the community around the corridor, and hope that we can continue to address those better.”

Stay tuned for future opportunities to join Sanders and other Portland Police officers on a bike ride. Learn more about the Bike Theft Task Force by following them on Twitter @PPBBikeTheft and on the web at PortlandOregon.gov.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

Our work is supported by subscribers. Please become one today.

The post Bike Theft Task Force officers host ride-along on the Springwater Corridor appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Bike Theft Task Force spreads awareness at Sunday Parkways

Bike Theft Task Force spreads awareness at Sunday Parkways

PPB Bike Theft Task Force at Sunday Parkways-8.jpg

The booth at the entrance to Woodlawn Park was buzzing with activity all day.
(Photos by J. Maus/BikePortland)

If we’re going to take a bite out of bike theft in Portland we need the whole community to step up: Police, bike shops, city bureaus, and citizens like you and me.

It’s all about education and collaboration — two things that were on display this past Sunday as the Portland Police Bureau’s Bike Theft Task Force made their presence felt at Sunday Parkways. Four uniformed officers joined with staff from the city’s Office of Neighborhood Involvement and citizen volunteers to register bikes and educate people about secure locking techniques.

It was the second go-round of the Task Force’s hugely popular U-lock? U-rock! program. Thanks to a collaboration with Project 529 (a Task Force member) and lock-maker ABUS, the Task Force was able to give away another 50 u-locks.

Sunday Parkways started at 11:00 am and the line for the locks started forming at around 10:00. To get one, people had to show up with a bike, get it registered on Project 529, demonstrate proper u-locking technique, and give us a cable lock as part of the exchange. We had three teams registering bikes and PPB officers on hand to answer questions, hand out information, and interact with the community.

PPB Bike Theft Task Force at Sunday Parkways-4.jpg

Officer Dave Bryant spreading knowledge to our youth.
PPB Bike Theft Task Force at Sunday Parkways-5.jpg

Love our new shirts.







PPB Bike Theft Task Force at Sunday Parkways-3.jpg

ONI Crime Prevention Coordinator Stefanie Kouremetis was a registration machine.
PPB Bike Theft Task Force at Sunday Parkways-6.jpg

Gotta’ find that serial number.
PPB Bike Theft Task Force at Sunday Parkways-7.jpg

Officer Oliphant spent the day talking to the throngs of riders that came past the booth.
PPB Bike Theft Task Force at Sunday Parkways-10.jpg

Officer Oliphant and one of Portland’s newest riders.
PPB Bike Theft Task Force at Sunday Parkways-12.jpg

Volunteer Pete Frey and his snazzy new BTTF t-shirt!
PPB Bike Theft Task Force at Sunday Parkways-13.jpg

Officer Benjamin Labasan helping out.
PPB Bike Theft Task Force at Sunday Parkways-14.jpg

Officer Dave Sanders demonstrating how to use a u-lock.
PPB Bike Theft Task Force at Sunday Parkways-15.jpg

PPB Bike Theft Task Force at Sunday Parkways-16.jpg

Registration teams in action!
PPB Bike Theft Task Force at Sunday Parkways-9.jpg

Another happy customer.
PPB Bike Theft Task Force at Sunday Parkways-17.jpg

This woman just got a new bike and wanted to make sure she locked it up correctly.
PPB Bike Theft Task Force at Sunday Parkways-19.jpg

PPB Bike Theft Task Force at Sunday Parkways-20.jpg

Preventing bike theft, one u-lock at a time.
PPB Bike Theft Task Force at Sunday Parkways-18.jpg

Just part of our team: (L to R) Stefanie Kouremetis, crime prevention coordinator, Office of Neighborhood Involvement; PPB Officer Benjamin Labasan; Me (Jonathan Maus); Peter Frey, citizen volunteer; and Sydney Wilson, ONI Crime Prevention program intern.
(Photo: PPB Officer Dave Sanders)

After handing in their old cable locks, many people got to grab a pair of bolt-cutters and slice through them.

We registered well over 100 bikes and gave away all the u-locks we brought in less than an hour. We also handed out lots of our new Bike Theft Task Force swag and told people about the important work we’re doing.

If you missed out on a u-lock this time, come find us at the Southeast Sunday Parkways on August 21st. If you’d like to be a Bike Theft Task Force volunteer, please get in touch.

I’m so grateful to be able to work with our Portland Police and this great team we’ve put together! We plan to continue to build the Task Force so we can have an even greater impact on preventing bike theft. For more info, see the official website.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

Our work is supported by subscribers. Please become one today.

The post Bike Theft Task Force spreads awareness at Sunday Parkways appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Bike Theft Task Force returns with popular u-lock exchange program

Bike Theft Task Force returns with popular u-lock exchange program

After receiving a new u-lock, this woman learned how easy it is to cut her old one.(Photos: Portland Police Bureau)

After receiving a new u-lock, this woman learned how easy it is to cut her old one.
(Photos: Portland Police Bureau)

Last month’s inaugural U-lock? U-Rock! exchange was so popular that the Portland Police Bureau’s Bike Theft Task Force (BTTF) ran out of locks within the first hour.

“Before we even got set up, there was a line. We could not keep up with the demand,” Portland Police Bureau Officer Dave Sanders wrote in a debrief. “At one point, there was a line of cyclists a block long and so many people congregating around our tents, that it was interfering with other organizations.”

Officer Sanders and a crew of volunteers (more are needed!) and city partners will be prepared for the onslaught this Sunday when the program returns for Sunday Parkways Northeast.

The idea behind the exchange program is simple: Sanders and his partner on the bike theft beat, Officer Dave Bryant, have seen way too many bikes stolen due to the use of cable locks because they’re easily snipped by thieves. Using a good quality u-lock is one of the best things riders can do to prevent bike theft.

To receive a free u-lock, participants must bring in a used cable lock and their bicycle. Registration with Project 529 (free) can be done at the event and is also required to get a lock. As a bonus, anyone who exchanges an old cable lock will get the chance to cut it with a pair of bolt cutters.







Officers Sanders and Bryant said about 600 people came by their booth and they’ve received national interest for the program with several other cities wanting to implement something similar.

U-lock recipients also learn proper locking technique.

U-lock recipients also learn proper locking technique.

The Task Force gave away 50 u-locks and registered 350 bikes at June’s Sunday Parkways event — all of which was made possible thanks to a partnership with Project 529 (whose CEO, J Allard, is a founding member of the task force) and ABUS, the lock maker. They plan to continue the program until they run out of locks (they were only able to afford 300 of them, purchased at a reduced price).

If you missed out they’ll have another batch of locks to give away at Sunday Parkways Northeast that opens this Sunday at 11:00 am. The Bike Theft Task Force booth will be at the southwestern tip of NE Oneonta Street adjacent to Woodlawn Park.

Due to the popularity of this program, the BTTF needs some help! Please consider giving us a hand on Sunday. If you can volunteer just drop us a line and we’ll get you set up. Or, you can just show up at the booth at 10:00 am on Sunday morning.

Learn more about the U-lock? U-Rock! program on the Bike Theft Task Force website.

Disclaimer: BikePortland is a (proud) member of the task force.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

Our work is supported by subscribers. Please become one today.

The post Bike Theft Task Force returns with popular u-lock exchange program appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Portland police will exchange a U-lock for your cable lock on Sunday

Portland police will exchange a U-lock for your cable lock on Sunday

hales lock

Mayor Charlie Hales on his way to work last fall.
(Photo: M.Andersen/BikePortland)

As bike theft has become the only major category of crime in Portland that’s on a long-term rise, cable locks have been going the way of the station wagon and the wristwatch.

The Portland State University Bike Hub doesn’t even sell them. When Mayor Charlie Hales briefly started biking to work last fall, Willamette Week wrote an entire online article about the fact that he used a cable lock. (His wife Nancy, a regular bike commuter, told us at the time that it was because they’d misplaced their U-lock keys that day.)

Apparently the Bike Theft Task Force at the Portland Police Bureau agrees. In a tweet on Wednesday, the team said they’ll be offering a lock exchange program at North Portland Sunday Parkways this weekend: you give them a cable lock, they give you a U-lock.







If you own a cable lock but not a U-lock, that’s a good deal.

(Thanks to Steve at the Portland Mercury for calling this to our attention.)

Update 2:30 p.m.: Portland Police Bureau Ofc. David Sanders, a member of the Bike Theft Task Force, writes to add some more details:

The BTTF was able to implement this cable lock upgrade program because of a partnership between Project 529 and Abus, and their dedication to reducing bike theft in Portland. They made it happen. Another example of the collaboration that is needed to fight this epidemic. We are also going to offer free bike registration through Project 529 at Sunday’s event, but the main emphasis of this event is proper locking techniques/bike security. We want the public to use U-locks so badly that we are literally giving them away. Hope that shows the public how serious we are about this. We hope that Sunday’s event will prevent many future thefts in Portland!

Project 529 worked with ABUS to work out the details on this program, we (PPB and PBOT funded this) were able to purchase the U-locks at significant discount through a local bike shop. We purchased about 300 locks and will offer a portion of these at Sunday’s event as well as other events around town, so this won’t be the only opportunity (unless we run out…).

— Michael Andersen, (503) 333-7824 – michael@bikeportland.org

Our work is supported by subscribers. Please become one today.

The post Portland police will exchange a U-lock for your cable lock on Sunday appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Police seek help finding bike burglar caught on video in Montavilla neighborhood

Police seek help finding bike burglar caught on video in Montavilla neighborhood

thiefscreengrab

Screenshot from home video shows man kicking down door.
Watch full video below.

On March 11th, Portlander Mitch Lomacz was the victim of a brazen theft. His home security cameras caught a man who walked into the backyard of his Montavilla home, forcibly kicked open the door of his garage and then grabbed a Scott CR1 road bike (retail value about $1,300).

Lomacz, who works at Cyclepath bike shop, now has the attention of Portland Police Bureau detectives who have put out an APB on the suspect. Apparently this isn’t the first time he’s burglarized a home in the neighborhood.

Please keep your eyes out for the bike and the suspect. Lomacz says the suspect is around 5′ 10 ” tall with a medium build and “sporty appearance”, slightly balding and light-colored hair, is a smoker and “definitely knows his way around a bike.” What makes Lomacz think the suspect is a bike guy? “He found a matching pair of pedals on my workbench full of crap/pedals and walked the bike away by the saddle suggesting he rides and handles bikes a lot.”

Watch the suspect at work in the video below:







Here’s another photo of the suspect and the bike that was taken:

image.cfm-2

stolen-scott

Lomacz said he has learned his lesson and plans to make his backyard more secure. “Time to finally build that fence. And a moat. With alligators,” he shared with us via email.

If you have any information you can leave an anonymous tip here.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

BikePortland can’t survive without subscribers. It’s just $10 per month and you can sign up in a few minutes.

The post Police seek help finding bike burglar caught on video in Montavilla neighborhood appeared first on BikePortland.org.