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Work parties begin as trails take shape at Gateway Green bike park

Work parties begin as trails take shape at Gateway Green bike park

Can't wait to ride it.(Photos by Jason Van Horn/Bermstyle)

Can’t wait to ride it.
(Photos by Jason Van Horn/Bermstyle)

Coming off a successful crowdfunding campaign that has raised over $100,000, backers of the Gateway Green bike park project have wasted no time in turning dirt and building the trails that will soon create a new community resource in east Portland.

With money in the bank and all necessary permits and permissions lined up, work has already started on what will become Portland’s first outdoor bike park. By spring a two-mile singletrack loop, a bike skills area, and a pump track will be ready to ride on the 25-acre parcel. (Learn more about what’s in the plans here.)

But none of it will happen with some good, old-fashioned sweat equity.







gateway-green-6820

All this week, the Portand Parks & Recreation, Friends of Gateway Green and the NW Trail Alliance have hosted volunteer work parties at the site. If you’d like to help, there’s one more coming on Saturday. Show up between 9:00 am and 12 noon if you’d like to help. Hand tools will be provided but you’ll want to bring your own work gloves and boots.

Trail builders say they’ve already come across all types of urban artifacts since digging into the wooded areas. “This is an urban environment with a colorful past that we have been uncovering.”

To help work party organizers plan, please email Gateway Green Dirt Lab project manager Sean Stroup via stroup11 [at] hotmail.com with the timeslot that works for you.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

BikePortland is supported by the community (that means you!). Please become a subscriber or make a donation today.

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With over $92,000 raised, off-road trails at Gateway Green will soon be a reality

With over $92,000 raised, off-road trails at Gateway Green will soon be a reality

It's happening! Equipment staged on the site this week.(Photo: Jason Van Horn/Bermstyle)

It’s happening! Equipment staged on the site this week.
(Photo: Jason Van Horn/Bermstyle)

In the past month over 500 people have chipped in $92,325 to help pay for the construction of new bike trails at Gateway Green — a formerly vacant plot of state-owned land (now owned by the City of Portland) at the intersection of I-84 and I-205.

Project backers aim to reach the goal of $100,000 in the next two days to match a Metro grant they’ve already received. If you haven’t donated yet, now would be a great time to do so.

With money in the bank and all the support and permissions lined up from various agencies, the Northwest Trail Alliance and Portland Parks & Recreation have already broken ground. Over the past few weeks Parks rangers have worked with an estimated 80 people who were camping on the land (who came there after being moved from the Springwater Corridor) to find shelter and other services. Fencing has now been erected around the property and heavy equipment is staging on the site.

“Can you imagine yourself at Gateway Green, standing astride your bike on the top of the southern hill, pointing your front tire down a ribbon of dirt that will flow down over whoops and around berms, a smile on your face?”
— Jocelyn Gaudi, Friends of Gateway Green

Suffice it to say, in a city where the lack of local off-road biking trails has frustrated many people for many years, this is a very big deal. Friends of Gateway Green Board Member Jocelyn Gaudi summed up why this project matters in a recent Facebook post:

Can you imagine yourself at Gateway Green, standing astride your bike on the top of the southern hill, pointing your front tire down a ribbon of dirt that will flow down over whoops and around berms, a smile on your face? A bunch of your friends are out there too – everyone, from kiddos to racers – is having a great time. On your ride home, you could stop by to get some tacos and a beer from your local spot. Pretty awesome way to spend a Tuesday evening, right?








The City of Portland is also very excited for this project. Besides creating a new public park in a part of town that sorely needs it, the Parks Bureau hopes these new trails relieve pressure on them to create off-road cycling opportunities in other — shall we say, more controversial areas. While some bike enthusiasts say the proposed trails at Gateway Green don’t come close to meeting demands, Parks is doing its best to drum up excitement.

“Portland Parks & Recreation feels that Gateway Green will be an outstanding site for off-road cycling, as well as hiking, as a place to reflect, and other uses,” the bureau wrote in a recent statement. “The site’s topography, it’s existing tree coverage and convenient location are sure to make it a coveted destination. Both soft-surface and paved multi-use trails will offer equitable and versatile access to visitors…”

The construction that will begin next week will be just the first phase of development at Gateway Green. New trails will come first and then habitat enhancements and other features will come in later phases.

As for what kind of trails we can expect, Parks is calling this “Portland’s first off-road cycling park.” As such, the “Dirt Lab” will feature singletrack and “jump trails” as well as a pump track (similar to Ventura Park but will be made out of precast concrete) and a skills area. The idea is to offer something for the full range of riders — from little ones to seasoned vets.

If you want to learn more about the project, help support it, and meet the people who have made it happen, there’s a fundraising party tonight at The Lumberyard.

Parks says they’ll need about 45 workdays to complete the first phase of trail-building. With winter weather and other issues mixed in, we’re hoping to ride in Gateway Green this coming spring! Stay tuned for updates.

We'll be riding here by spring.

We’ll be riding here by spring.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

BikePortland is supported by the community (that means you!). Please become a subscriber or make a donation today.

The post With over $92,000 raised, off-road trails at Gateway Green will soon be a reality appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Parks bureau must address homeless campers before trails can be built at Gateway Green

Parks bureau must address homeless campers before trails can be built at Gateway Green

BAC Bike Ride East Portland-19

Get used to more of this at Gateway Green.
(Photo: J. Maus/BikePortland)

In the past nine days, over 200 people have chipped in nearly $60,000 toward to the construction of the “Dirt Lab” at Gateway Green. But as excitement builds for the first new singletrack trails in Portland in what seems like forever, advocates and partners behind the project have come face-to-face with one of Portland’s most vexing issues: homelessness.

Dozens of people who were just moved from the massive homeless camping villages on the Springwater Corridor path have found solace at Gateway Green, the 40-acre parcel of vacant land that sits at the intersection of two freeways in east Portland. That means before any shovels can hit the ground to build the new trails and riding areas, the city must address the land’s current residents.

Homeless campers at Gateway Green

Camp in Gateway Green

Portland Parks and Recreation is the owner of the land and they’re spearheading the plan to help the campers. That effort started on Monday when Portland Park Rangers and social service providers from the area began visiting the site to conduct outreach. Below is part of the statement PP&R has issued:

It is heartbreaking, but there are people who are living on the property, as Portland is faced with a crisis around housing and people experiencing homelessness. Camping in parks and on park properties has always been, and continues to be, prohibited. Our parks and natural areas are simply not designed for people to live in them. But Rangers recognize that it is not a crime to simply be homeless. Parks Commissioner Amanda Fritz has been clear – and police agree – that enforcement alone does not solve this complex societal issue. So as part of their jobs, Rangers who identify people camping in parks try hard to assist these individuals by forming relationships with them, and connecting them with resources and agencies such as JOIN. If people do not wish to accept such services, Rangers’ options are limited. Also note that we have more than 11,000 acres of parks and natural areas in the Portland Parks & Recreation system.







Other than trying to connect people living there with social services and to get them assistance, the other goal of the outreach is to inform people that Monday, 10/3 is the start of cleanup of any debris or structures at the Gateway Green site. Site cleanup will be done by the City’s contractor and is expected to take one or two weeks. 

After cleanup, long-planned construction for the park site will soon be underway and a fence is going up shortly.

2016-09-24 16.50.13

Camp (and commons area?) in Gateway Green

Parks says they’ll begin staging construction materials and equipment on October 10-12 and a fence will be erected around the project site by October 14th.

While some off-road cycling advocates have their issues with how Portland Parks has managed the singletrack issue in places like Forest Park and River View Natural Area, the agency is in full support of trails at Gateway Green. “Portland Parks & Recreation feels that Gateway Green will be an outstanding site for off-road cycling,” said a statement issued by their spokesperson Mark Ross. “The site’s topography, it’s existing tree coverage and convenient location are sure to make it a coveted destination… Our Commissioner-in-Charge of Parks, Amanda Fritz, has said that Gateway Green could be a key connection point for cycling within the city. It lies not only at the confluence of two major freeways, but at the intersection of the I-205 regional trail and the future Sullivan’s Gulch Trail. So there are a wide range of possibilities, and many reasons to be excited about Gateway Green right now.”

Once construction of the Dirt Lab begins on October 19th it’s expected to be completed and ready to ride by this coming spring (not six weeks like we previously reported).

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

BikePortland is supported by the community (that means you!). Please become a subscriber or make a donation today.

Edit- September 24: added some photos of the larger camps at Gateway Green. There are 2-3 camps with about a dozen tents each; there are many more camps with 1-3 tents/living units scattered around this large space. (Ted)

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Funding campaign launches for singletrack and ‘Dirt Lab’ at Gateway Green

Funding campaign launches for singletrack and ‘Dirt Lab’ at Gateway Green

Gateway_Green_Birdseye_South

New rendering of Gateway Green’s Dirt Lab shows the view from the northern end of the site.

The time has finally come to grab our shovels and turn on the trail-building machine. If all goes according to plan we’ll be riding two miles of fresh singletrack trails at Gateway Green, a 25-acre parcel of land in east Portland between interstates 84 and 205, by this winter.

The Friends of Gateway Green have just launched a crowdfunding campaign that will allow them to finally build trails and other features that will open the site for public bicycling and hiking access.

Here’s the new promo video that explains the “Dirt Lab” concept:

The City of Portland’s Parks Bureau acquired Gateway Green from the Oregon Department of Transportation two years ago — and that big step came one year after advocates and volunteers kicked off this current planning and fundraising effort.

We first shared the vision for Gateway Green here on BikePortland over eight years ago.

A crowdfunding effort in 2013 successfuly raised money to create the trail plans and public space designs. With that, the Friends of Gateway Green were able to apply for funding and received a $1 million matching grant from Metro. Now they’ve cleared all the hurdles necessary and all that’s left is to move some dirt around and start riding (or walking if that’s your thing!).

So, what exactly are the plans for this Dirt Lab? Here’s how the Friends group describes it:

We are creating a dynamic destination for our community to get kids and adults outside to explore nature, play, learn, socialize, and ride bikes.

Dirt Lab is all of the foundational elements of Gateway Green – it’s the new neighborhood dirt pile, the place you played as a kid. Like Gateway Green itself, these features are dynamic and fluid, and the trails, jumps, and tracks can grow, change and move as the whole park is developed. Gateway Green will create new homes for bees, bugs, birds, and bikes in Portland’s most nature-deficient neighborhood.

Here are a few more of the latest renderings and the full concept plan:

Gateway_View_02







Gateway_View_01

Gateway Green Concept Plan DraftRevised

As you can see in the renderings, the two-mile singletrack will loop around the property. They also plan to build a number of other features to appeal to a wide range of rider styles, ages, and abilities. There will be a jump line, a skills area intended for little tykes on balance bikes, a precast concrete pump track, and more.

The current crowdfunding campaign is hosted by Oregon’s Kitchen Table and has already raised over $11,000 toward a goal of $100,000.

Stay tuned for volunteer work party announcements and other developments. Learn more and find links to donate at the Friends of Gateway Green site.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

BikePortland is supported by the community (that means you!). Please become a subscriber or make a donation today.

The post Funding campaign launches for singletrack and ‘Dirt Lab’ at Gateway Green appeared first on BikePortland.org.

A ride into the future with east Portland’s biking action committee

A ride into the future with east Portland’s biking action committee

elizabeth

Walter Lersch and Elizabeth Quiroz on NE Weidler. A curb-protected bike lane couplet will arrive there next year.
(Photos: M.Andersen/BikePortland)

Portland’s vast east side has huge potential for biking, and many millions of dollars in biking improvements are poised to drop on its streets.

It’s also gearing up for what could be a regional-destination bike recreation park in the form of Gateway Green.

But the little cadre of folks who’ve scored those victories are looking for new blood to set the area’s next goals. The East Portland Action Plan bike committee invited me to join them on a tour Tuesday night of some of the most promising biking projects about to happen on the east side.

full crew at muchas

The EPAP Bike Subcommittee met Tuesday outside the Muchas Gracias in Gateway.

“I know there’s riders out in east Portland, and we need people participating,” said Jim Chasse, an east Portlander for decades who started advocating for bike lanes before he started biking for transportation, simply because he heard that transportation improvements were possible and he was happy to get any improvements in his neighborhood at all. He’s since become a passionate daily rider. “It’s all coming together and it’s going to come together fast.”

Chasse said the 100s, 130s and 150s Neighborhood Greenways are all funded and may all be in construction simultaneously in the next two years. That’s in addition to the Market-Mill-Main-Millmain (or 4M) Neighborhood Greenway running east and west, which was just funded with local money as part of the city gas tax. Then there’s outer Powell Boulevard and outer Division Street — the first due for bike-lane improvements under a state project and the latter supposed to get better bike lanes as part of a TriMet express bus line project.

On Tuesday we rode a bit of another planned neighborhood greenway, the Tillamook-Holladay-Oregon-Pacific. It already includes some speed bumps and sharrows but isn’t yet upgraded to modern greenway status.

thop greenway

To me, the most exciting bit of this greenway plan is the newest to be added to it: a possible connection to NE Tillamook Street beneath I-205, replacing the Halsey’s awful I-205 overpass as the best way to get to the Gateway neighborhood from the west. The stretch in question, EPAP Bike members explained, could extend east from the Tillamook greenway that currently dead-ends at 92nd Avenue, then dip just below I-205 onto Oregon Department of Transportation land and loop around this hillside:

gateway hillside passage

…which would let it plug right into the I-205 Multi-Use Path, immediately north of Gateway Transit Center.

I-205 path







Here’s a rough map of how the connection could work, with the I-205 path marked in purple and the new neighborhood greenway route in orange:

undercrossing

“When we get the access to 205, this is a regional center,” said Chasse, referring to the city’s plan for Gateway. The neighborhood is now served by three MAX lines and its vast parking lots are all zoned to become Lloyd District-style skyscrapers if only a developer would show interest. For the moment, the future skyscraper site was hosting this group of friends’ skateboard jump:

gateway parking lot

We also swung briefly by the East Portland Neighborhood Office to appreciate what Chasse described, with both humor and honesty, as some of the best bike parking in east Portland:

bike parking at EPNO

Next we headed up to the Halsey-Weidler couplet, which is slated to get protected bike lanes through east Portland’s only sidewalk-facing commercial district. It, too, has a long way to go, though you can see how development might happen gradually:

weidler

chasse

“It was difficult to bike in east Portland, said Linda Robinson, chair of the Gateway Green park plan and an EPAP Bike committee member. “But that’s changing. It’s getting ready to change.”

Chasse said he’s hoping to curtail his work on EPAP Bike this year to focus on home improvement projects, a new long-distance relationship and more. With so much money about to land in the area he thinks it’s an ideal time for new people to get involved and ride the momentum forward.

“We’re kind of in between right now,” he said. “We’ve got all the funding. We’ve got all our ducks lined up. … We need to know what to do next.”

timo linda

Timo Forsberg of the Portland Bureau of Transportation compares bikeway routes with Linda Robinson of Gateway Green.

— Michael Andersen, (503) 333-7824 – michael@bikeportland.org

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City Budget Office denies Parks’ request for Gateway Green and off-road cycling plan funds

City Budget Office denies Parks’ request for Gateway Green and off-road cycling plan funds

BAC Bike Ride East Portland-19

Riders in Gateway Green, a future bike park.
(Photo J Maus/BikePortland)

Portlanders itching for more places to ride bikes in the dirt will now have to work extra hard, thanks to a report from the City Budget Office (PDF) that recommends zero funding for two Portland Parks & Recreation projects we’ve been following very closely: Gateway Green and the Off-Road Cycling Master Plan.

Does this mean those two projects won’t be funded? No. The report is just one factor Mayor Hales and City Council will use to decide where money should be spent. But the CBO recommendation does underscore the difficult politics around these two projects and it means anyone who wants to see them become reality will have to make sure their voices are heard in the coming weeks and months.

We reached out the Budget Office, Commissioner Fritz’s office, and supporters of these projects to learn more about what this all means…

Each budget cycle the City Budget Office (CBO) reviews each bureau’s budget requests and issues a report that is then passed onto the commissioners and the mayor. The CBO refers to its work as, “timely, accurate, and unfiltered information and analysis regarding budgeting, forecasting, and fiscal policy issues.” As part of the review, the CBO looks at a range of factors before deciding whether or not a specific project should be funded. Those factors include: how strongly the project aligns with adopted plans, priorities, and policy goals (like equity and maintaining existing assets), whether or not there’s a more suitable revenue source, how important the requested funding amount is relative to the entire project, and so on.

Parks has requested $250,000 in “one-time” funding to help with the ongoing development of Gateway Green (the total phase one project cost is $5.4 million). The project will build a network of bike trails, a bike skills area, and other new outdoor recreational opportunities on a 36-acre parcel at the confluence of I-84 and I-205. This past fall, we reported on an exhibition cyclocross event held on the parcel that gave an exciting glimpse into its potential.

Parks’ $250,000 ask would help the non-profit Friends of Gateway Green raise $1 million by 2016, a fundraising goal teed up by a Metro Nature in Neighborhood Grant they won back in July.

Unfortunately, the CBO does not think this a worthy funding request. Here’s their reasoning:

“The completed Gateway Green will primarily serve cyclocross riders but also include pedestrian trails, a children’s play area, and a field house for environmental education classes. With the planned access improvements, the park will serve 413 households within 1⁄2 mile of the park to the west of I‐205.

While this project does increase park access to households, other bureau capital projects would provide greater increased access to a broader group of residents. As such, CBO does not recommend funding for this project at this time.”

We rely on financial support from readers like you.

It’s important to note that this funding request is not tied to any actual capital construction. If it was, the CBO says System Development Charges could be a possible source of funds.

We asked Friends of Gateway Green Chair Linda Robinson for her response to the CBO recommendations. “What it means to me,” she said, “is that it will be very important for folks to show up at the budget hearings this spring and advocate for this one-time funding for Gateway Green!” While Robinson will obviously be pushing for this funding, she told us her group has other options they are pursuing in case in doesn’t come through.

The Parks bureau has also requested $350,000 for the Off-Road Cycling Master Plan. This plan has made headlines recently because Parks Commissioner Amanda Fritz says it must be completed before off-road biking access is added or improved in any city park. Bike advocates have strongly supported the funding of this plan, but their willingness to support Parks in the request has been seriously tested after the recent decision by Fritz and Environmental Services Commissioner Nick Fish to ban biking at River View Natural Area.

Here’s why the CBO doesn’t think the plan is a wise use of city funds:

“The cycling community has expressed strong interest in expanding off‐road cycling options; however, the current focus of the bureau’s current capital plan reflects its most pressing needs: maintaining assets and expanding access to underserved resident [sic]. Because this project is not included in capital plans and the bureau has other, higher priority capital needs, CBO does not recommend funding this project.”

Advocates for off-road biking have expressed concerns to us about the information the CBO used to reach their decision. For instance, the CBO cites an estimated cost of $120,000 to $300,000 per mile for building trails while one trail building expert we talked to said the actual cost would be closer to $50,000 per mile. The CBO analysis also mentioned that the plan “may identify four to six miles of new trails.”

According to City Budget Office analyst Ryan Kinsella, both of these figures came directly from the Parks bureau. “They did caveat their estimates as being ‘low confidence’,” he shared. While the direct costs of single-track construction can vary anywhere from $60,000 to $150,000 per mile, he said the “soft costs” like staff and design time would double that amount.

While the CBO review of these project is a respected voice in the budget process, even City Budget Director Andrew Scott calls his reviews nothing more than, “a starting framework for Mayor and Council deliberations on the budget.”

Commissioner Fritz’s Policy Advisor Patti Howard put a positive spin on the recommendations. She told us that since they came out earlier this month, “revenues projections have increased significantly so there are now more funds to be allocated.” She also added that Fritz and Commissioner Fish still support both of these projects and urged citizens to speak up for them during the budget process.

Even so, simply having the support of Fish and Fritz will not be nearly enough to get the Off-Road Cycling Plan fully funded. As Scott, the CBO chief told us, “Even in a year with a surplus, there are far more requests than available funding, so we’re comparing requests like the off-road cycling master plan against requests for housing, firefighters, street paving, etc.”

From here, Council will hold work sessions on the budget with CBO staff and public hearings are scheduled for April and May.

After those hearings, Mayor Hales will release his proposed budget and the final budget won’t adopted until late June. Stay tuned.

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Here are the Portland Bicycle Advisory Committee’s top 10 priorities citywide

Here are the Portland Bicycle Advisory Committee’s top 10 priorities citywide

bac top 10

What do you think?
(Click to enlarge, or see below for details and links)

As we reported earlier this week, the City of Portland is trying to hone its massive transportation to-do list by asking people to rank their 10 favorite projects.

In a letter circulated this week, the citizens’ committee that’s most closely tied to Portland’s biking policies shared theirs.

Here’s the list, with a links to past coverage of each project:

1) A biking-walking bridge across Interstate 84 between NE 7th, 8th and/or 9th Avenues. This would create the most comfortable inland freeway crossing in the city between inner Northeast and Southeast Portland, linking the rapidly redeveloping Lloyd District and enabling a “green loop” of comfortable bikeways ringing the central city. $8.3 million.

2) Northeast Broadway Corridor improvements from the Broadway Bridge to NE 24th. This would link up to an anticipated protected bike lane on NW/SW Broadway all the way to maybe the #1 biking destination in the city: Portland State University. $3.5 million.

3) Terwilliger Bikeway Gaps. These would create a continuous bike lane over the hills above Barbur Boulevard and through Southwest Portland past another major biking destination, Oregon Health and Science University. $1 million.

4) Inner Barbur Corridor improvements. The needlessly wide stretch of road between Terwilliger and SW 3rd sometimes known as the Barbur Woods, where the land is mostly flat but the bike lanes end at two bridges and one person dies per year. $3.7 million.

5) I-205 undercrossing at NE Hancock and I-205. Connecting the 82nd Avenue area near Rocky Butte to Gateway Green and ultimately the developing Gateway regional center. $2 million.

We rely on financial support from readers like you.

6) 4M Neighborhood Greenway. A neighborhood greenway, already fully planned, snaking from the I-205 path past David Douglas High School and eastward to the Gresham border. $450,000.

7) 122nd Avenue Corridor Improvements from NE Sandy to SE Foster. Bike lane, sidewalk and public transit stop improvements on East Portland’s most important north-south street. TriMet has said it would upgrade the 71 bus to frequent service if changes like these are made. $8 million.

8) North Portland Greenway Trail from Swan Island to the Rose Quarter. A direct link between two of the city’s fastest-growing job areas, Swan Island and the Central Eastside, and part of a continuous off-road path from the tip of the St Johns peninsula to the Springwater Corridor.

9) Portland Bike Share. Using shared bicycles to create an active and supremely cheap form of all-hours public transit in the central city and surrounding neighborhoods. $4.5 million.

10) NW Flanders Neighborhood Greenway, including a biking-walking bridge across I-405. The first comfortable link between downtown Portland and the city’s densest residential neighborhood, connecting to the Steel Bridge and TriMet MAX. $3 million.

BAC Chair Ian Stude said this week that the committee devoted a lot of effort to building this list, drawing on what he said is a geographically diverse membership and striving to serve a mix of neighborhoods and populations.

In its letter, the committee added:

The PBAC has concerns about the overall project selection for the TSP constrained and unconstrained list and how this aligns with the need to equitably distribute these projects throughout the city. However, we have identified 10 high priority projects from the list of 290 currently listed in the TSP draft. We ask that PSC and PBOT prioritize these projects as critical improvements to the transportation network.

How do you think they did? Whether you disagree with any (as reader Terry D-M did, vociferously and with data) or agree wholeheartedly, it’s not too late contact the city by email or using its online Map App tool.

The post Here are the Portland Bicycle Advisory Committee’s top 10 priorities citywide appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Here are the Portland Bicycle Advisory Committee’s top 10 priorities citywide

Here are the Portland Bicycle Advisory Committee’s top 10 priorities citywide

bac top 10

What do you think?
(Click to enlarge, or see below for details and links)

As we reported earlier this week, the City of Portland is trying to hone its massive transportation to-do list by asking people to rank their 10 favorite projects.

In a letter circulated this week, the citizens’ committee that’s most closely tied to Portland’s biking policies shared theirs.

Here’s the list, with a links to past coverage of each project:

1) A biking-walking bridge across Interstate 84 between NE 7th, 8th and/or 9th Avenues. This would create the most comfortable inland freeway crossing in the city between inner Northeast and Southeast Portland, linking the rapidly redeveloping Lloyd District and enabling a “green loop” of comfortable bikeways ringing the central city. $8.3 million.

2) Northeast Broadway Corridor improvements from the Broadway Bridge to NE 24th. This would link up to an anticipated protected bike lane on NW/SW Broadway all the way to maybe the #1 biking destination in the city: Portland State University. $3.5 million.

3) Terwilliger Bikeway Gaps. These would create a continuous bike lane over the hills above Barbur Boulevard and through Southwest Portland past another major biking destination, Oregon Health and Science University. $1 million.

4) Inner Barbur Corridor improvements. The needlessly wide stretch of road between Terwilliger and SW 3rd sometimes known as the Barbur Woods, where the land is mostly flat but the bike lanes end at two bridges and one person dies per year. $3.7 million.

5) I-205 undercrossing at NE Hancock and I-205. Connecting the 82nd Avenue area near Rocky Butte to Gateway Green and ultimately the developing Gateway regional center. $2 million.

We rely on financial support from readers like you.

6) 4M Neighborhood Greenway. A neighborhood greenway, already fully planned, snaking from the I-205 path past David Douglas High School and eastward to the Gresham border. $450,000.

7) 122nd Avenue Corridor Improvements from NE Sandy to SE Foster. Bike lane, sidewalk and public transit stop improvements on East Portland’s most important north-south street. TriMet has said it would upgrade the 71 bus to frequent service if changes like these are made. $8 million.

8) North Portland Greenway Trail from Swan Island to the Rose Quarter. A direct link between two of the city’s fastest-growing job areas, Swan Island and the Central Eastside, and part of a continuous off-road path from the tip of the St Johns peninsula to the Springwater Corridor. $7.3 million.

9) Portland Bike Share. Using shared bicycles to create an active and supremely cheap form of all-hours public transit in the central city and surrounding neighborhoods. $4.5 million.

10) NW Flanders Neighborhood Greenway, including a biking-walking bridge across I-405. The first comfortable link between downtown Portland and the city’s densest residential neighborhood, connecting to the Steel Bridge and TriMet MAX. $3 million.

BAC Chair Ian Stude said this week that the committee devoted a lot of effort to building this list, drawing on what he said is a geographically diverse membership and striving to serve a mix of neighborhoods and populations.

In its letter, the committee added:

The PBAC has concerns about the overall project selection for the TSP constrained and unconstrained list and how this aligns with the need to equitably distribute these projects throughout the city. However, we have identified 10 high priority projects from the list of 290 currently listed in the TSP draft. We ask that PSC and PBOT prioritize these projects as critical improvements to the transportation network.

How do you think they did? Whether you disagree with any (as reader Terry D-M did, vociferously and with data) or agree wholeheartedly, it’s not too late contact the city by email or using its online Map App tool.

The post Here are the Portland Bicycle Advisory Committee’s top 10 priorities citywide appeared first on BikePortland.org.

There’s a cyclocross race at Gateway Green next month!

There’s a cyclocross race at Gateway Green next month!

Gateway Green Kick the Dirt event-15

Gateway Green: Portland’s future premier cyclocross racing venue.
(Photos by J. Maus/BikePortland)

We are excited to announce that six and-a-half years after we first told you about Gateway Green, supporters of the project have planned their first official bike event. Yesterday on their Facebook page, the Friends of Gateway Green unveiled plans for “Community CX,” a cyclocross exhibition race that will take place on November 15th.

The event announcement comes less than two months after the City of Portland officially took over ownership of the 30-acre parcel that sits adjacent to the Airport MAX and the intersection of I-84 and 205. Portland bought the parcel from the Oregon Department of Transportation for $19,300 and plans to develop the area as an off-road cycling destination.

Portland Parks Commissioner Amanda Fritz said back in August that Gateway Green will, “boost Portland’s visibility as a world-class bike-friendly city,” and that it’s, “a tremendous use of the underutilized land.”

BAC Bike Ride East Portland-19

Riding down the highest point at the
park’s southern end (near Halsey overpass).

Gateway Green’s topography and mix of open meadows and forested areas make it a natural place for cyclocross. Jocelyn Gaudi, a Friends board member, says she and other volunteers have designed “a dynamic course with plenty of great observation areas to entertain the whole crowd.” The Community CX event will feature a full slate of racing for all categories and there will also be activities for kids.

Gaudi adds the the event will be more of a community gathering and the race is meant to be “fun and casual.” It will also be historic, given that this will be the first-ever organized bike event at Gateway Green and, according to Gaudi, it’s the first cyclocross race to be held on a Portland Parks-owned property since 2002 (if you don’t count Portland International Raceway).

The race also marks the start of a major fundraising campaign. Race entries will be $20, all of which will go toward the $1.6 million that the Friends of Gateway Green must raise in order to cash in on the $1 million Metro grant they won back in July. When all this funding comes together, they’ll have $3 million to spend on the first phase of the park’s development.

— Check out the event schedule and stay tuned for updates by checking out the Facebook event page. If you have questions or would like to get involved with the event, contact Gaudi at jocelyn(AT)gatewaygreenpdx(DOT)org.

The post There’s a cyclocross race at Gateway Green next month! appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Future off-road bike park Gateway Green acquired by City of Portland

Future off-road bike park Gateway Green acquired by City of Portland

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Conceptual drawing of the off-road biking plans.

A key step toward making Gateway Green a reality was taken today when Portland City Council voted unanimously to authorize a land transfer from the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT). Portland is now the official owner of the 25 acre property that’s slated to become what Portland Parks & Recreation referred to today as an “off-road biking facility.”

The City of Portland acquired the land from ODOT for $19,300, money they received from developers via System Development Charges (SDCs).

In a statement released today by PP&R, City Parks Commissioner Amanda Fritz said,

“The location between I-205 and I-84 will boost Portland’s visibility as a world-class bike-friendly city, and is a tremendous use of the underutilized land… I admire how neighbors and cyclists have come together to see their vision for Gateway Green move forward… It will be an important addition to our infrastructure that enhances wildlife habitat and recreation for children, families and seniors.”

And PP&R Director Mike Abbaté said the new park will fill some of the demand from Portlanders who have been clamoring for more off-road biking opportunities. “The Portland cycling community has long asked for more recreational opportunities across our system,” he said, “Gateway Green will provide a place where bicyclists of all ages can gather, develop their skills and enjoy the outdoors, all while increasing their physical health.”

Last month, Gateway Green won a $1 million grant through Metro’s Nature in Neighborhoods program.

Linda Robinson, who along with developer Ted Gilbert, has been working toward this vision for over six years, said today was an exciting day and a “perfect example of how ‘patient persistence’ can pay off.”

— Learn more at GatewayGreenPDX.org.

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