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Salmonberry Trail to the coast hits milestone, begins fundraising effort

Salmonberry Trail to the coast hits milestone, begins fundraising effort

The Salmonberry Trail would connect Banks
to Tillamook on the Oregon Coast.
(Map by Oregon State Parks & Rec)

The proposed Salmonberry Trail, a path that would connect Washington County to the Pacific coast through the forest along a defunct rail line, has an official name and is about to get a full-time executive director.

Previously referred to as the “Salmonberry Corridor,” the trail also has an 11-member decision-making body with formal power to start raising the unknown millions that’d be required for the 86-mile proposal.

The Salmonberry Coalition will celebrate those milestones at its annual meeting next month. The public event is 10 a.m. to noon on Friday, Oct. 9, at Stub Stewart State Park.

“We’ve been having steering committee meetings about once a month,” state trails coordinator Rocky Houston said in an interview Tuesday about the coalition’s progress.

The biggest upcoming milestone for the path is likely to be the hiring of its first full-time staffer. Houston said the hiring process is underway for a two-year job to lay the groundwork for a major and ongoing search for grants, donations and other deals that could make the project possible.

salmon-rail-with-trail-after

Rail-with-trail (above) and rail-to-trail (below) renderings from the Salmonberry Corridor Draft Concept plan released last year. It’s not certain that all segments would be paved, especially at first.

The Salmonberry Trail would run through Washington and Tillamook counties along the route of a mostly unused rail line that has repeatedly been washed out by floods. It’d connect with the existing Banks-Vernonia Trail and the planned Council Creek Regional Trail between Hillsboro and Banks to create a continuous trail network from the Portland metro area to the Oregon coast.

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Houston said the executive director will be a state parks employee and that the position will come with a budget of about “$200,000 over two years for salaries and benefits and all those things.” It’ll continue through at least the 2016 and 2017 fiscal years.

salmon-rail-to-trail-after

The money comes from the state Department of Forestry, from the Washington County Visitors Association, from Tillamook County, from the state Parks Department and from the nonprofit Cycle Oregon, which has been an instigating advocate for the project along with state Sen. Betsy Johnson, D-Scappoose.

The forestry and parks departments, along with Tillamook County and the Port of Tillamook Bay, are the four voting members on the Salmonberry Trail Authority.

That group’s official creation last week was reported Monday by the Tillamook County Pioneer.

The Authority also has seven nonvoting members: representatives for Washington County, the Washington County Visitors Association, the Tillamook Forest Heritage Trust, Cycle Oregon, the regional solutions representative from the state governor’s office, the office of the state representative for District 32 (currently Deborah Boone, D-Cannon Beach) and the office of the state senator for District 16 (currently Johnson).


The post Salmonberry Trail to the coast hits milestone, begins fundraising effort appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Path under construction will link Springwater system to central Gresham (photos)

Path under construction will link Springwater system to central Gresham (photos)

gresham path lead

The new two-mile trail is funded mostly by regional flexible funds allocated by Metro at the request of east Multnomah County governments.
(Photos: M.Andersen/BikePortland)

Though it’s possible to get between central Gresham and the Springwater Corridor by bike lane, there’s never been a truly comfortable link between the two, or first-rate bike connection between Gresham’s central business district and the dense Rockwood area. That’s about to change.

Gresham is building a wide new paved path alongside the MAX tracks between the Cleveland Avenue station, at the eastern end of the Blue Line, and the Ruby Junction station where many TriMet trains stop their runs to go out of service.

When it opens sometime this year, it’ll be a million-dollar upgrade to the made path that’s run in the grass alongside the tracks for years.

made path

Here’s a Metro map of the route, with the Springwater Corridor and Gresham-Fairview Trail marked in green:

MAXPath-route-map

David Daly, Gresham’s engineer on the project, said Tuesday that the route will be fully ready to ride by Oct. 17 at the latest. That’s the contracting firm’s deadline to finish everything, including new plantings.

Daly said the path might open sooner than that.

“The track belongs to our contractor until they’ve reached substantial completion,” he said. “We’ve had good weather this spring, so we’ve been able to keep out ahead of schedule so far.”

On Sunday, with construction halted for the moment, a friend and I headed west on the future path out of downtown Gresham. Though I wouldn’t recommend it as a transportation route with or without anyone at work, it was easy to see what a nice amenity this will be once it’s complete.

It runs adjacent to TriMet land, interacting gracefully with stops along the way like the Civic Drive station here:

josh by mid rail stop

trucks on right

As it approaches Ruby Junction, the route cuts beneath the rail line:

under the arch

And almost to the Ruby Junction station, it meets the existing Gresham-Fairview Trail, which runs south to the Springwater.

trail intersection

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Another option for folks headed toward Portland is to follow this sidewalk just south of the Ruby Junction station…

ruby junction

past ruby junction

…and onto Yamhill Street, which is moderately comfortable at best due to wide lanes and regular traffic. Fortunately, this section is due for some modest improvement — sharrow markings in the lane — thanks to a Regional Travel Options grant from Metro announced last week.

yamhill uncomfortable

…until you reach a calmer part of the street.

yamhill comfortable

Yamhill, in turn, connects to Main Street and the planned 4M Neighborhood Greenway, which snakes all the way west through the neighborhoods to Interstate 205.

parkrose school

After navigating our way east using the narrow, busy Springwater on a sunny weekend morning, seeing the wide right-of-way set aside for this path was its own sort of fresh air.

You can read Gresham’s account of the trail plans here.

If I have any major concerns about the route, it’d be nighttime safety in a setting that’s quite separate from the street grid — “ultimately, the best way to deter crime and vandalism on the trail is to have a large volume of users,” the city writes — and that other bane of the outer Springwater: the street crossings. It won’t be until we see the design elements there that it’ll be clear whether this nice new facility is going to make itself truly obvious to people whenever they drive across it.

The post Path under construction will link Springwater system to central Gresham (photos) appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Lake Oswego city council revives concept of bike path on old trolleyway

Lake Oswego city council revives concept of bike path on old trolleyway

ooswego2

New attention, old idea.

Three years after Lake Oswego pulled out of a plan to upgrade its little-used riverside trolley line into a high-speed streetcar, the idea of turning the tracks into a biking-walking path is back in discussion.

This time, the idea is being driven by recently reelected Lake Oswego City Council member Jeff Gudman, who embraced the idea after hearing about it repeatedly from Lake Oswego residents during his campaigns.

“As I was doing my door to door, any number of people would say to me that they really like the idea,” Gudman said in an interview Thursday. “Some wanted streetcar, bike and ped. Others wanted just bike and ped.”

As the Oregonian’s editorial board reported Thursday, this week Gudman won his colleagues’ approval for a study of the legal issues surrounding a riverside trail.

“I brought it up again this year and there was the support to get a memorandum from our city attorney going over all the challenges and the opportunities that are associated with it and we would go from there,” Gudman said.

The longstanding obstacle to a biking-walking path is that when a consortium of local governments bought the old trolley line in hopes of one day reviving it as a streetcar, they received only the right to use it as rail. On some of the properties, if the land is used for any other purpose, it’d revert to the adjacent landowner.

But Gudman said that in some of those cases, the path could simply divert onto a nearby neighborhood street, then rejoin the riverside.

“If you already have a street there and it’s merely a matter of putting down bike lane markings … that seems to me to be a pretty good solution,” Gudman said. “Think about the opportunity to have a bike-ped connection with downtown Portland all the way along the Willamette River, all the way to Oregon City. … What a magnificent addition to our cities.”

It’s also worth noting that today’s Oregonian coverage came from the editorial page, which rarely seems to spare a good word about bicycling. It was illustrated with photos of the old tracks credited to Erik Lukens, the newspaper’s conservative editorial writer, who mentioned in the comments that he’s a Lake Oswego resident.

“It may not happen in my lifetime,” Gudman said. “But I’d like to see us going down that path.”

NOTE: This story was initially published with a different lead graphic.

The post Lake Oswego city council revives concept of bike path on old trolleyway appeared first on BikePortland.org.

A region can dream: The metro area’s vision for its future path network

A region can dream: The metro area’s vision for its future path network

regional map

(Click the image to enlarge, or see this zoomable PDF or web version.)

When you stitch together the long-term bike plans of every city in the area, connect a few dots and put it all on one map, you get something pretty spectacular.

“We want to move away from ‘bike lane ends’ or ‘trail ends.’ People don’t know when they’re passing from one owner of a road or into a jurisdiction. So we want that completeness across the region.”
— Lake Strongheart McTighe, Metro

That’s what regional government Metro did this summer, when its council unanimously approved the region’s new active transportation plan.

Assuming Oregonians don’t make any radical decisions such as earmarking, say, an additional 5 percent of our annual gas tax revenue for off-road urban paths, the network pictured above will take many decades to build. But even at today’s rates, the state, region and cities are chipping away at this plan; look at the Tualatin River Greenway gap, which outscored 99 out of 103 other transportation projects from around the state last spring to get $1.4 million from Oregon Lottery revenues.

You can see that 0.8-mile project in the cluster of yellow lines southwest of Lake Oswego. If you zoom way in.

Metro’s “Active Transportation Plan Regional Trails Network Vision,” as it’s known, is as big as its name. But that’s the point, says its architect, Lake Strongheart McTighe.

“The regional plan is really a way to coordinate all of the various efforts that are happening around the region so that the sum of the parts is really great,” said McTighe, a senior transportation planner at Metro, said in an interview Tuesday. “We want to move away from ‘bike lane ends’ or ‘trail ends.’ People don’t know when they’re passing from one owner of a road or into a jurisdiction. So we want that completeness across the region.”

An example: the new Active Transportation Plan, for the first time, identifies a “Beaverton to Milwaukie Trail” that would run alongside Highway 26 through the West Hills, joining downtown Portland’s hub of trails with the developing network in Washington County.

Here’s another big map in Metro’s new plan: one that includes not just off-street paths but also on-street routes.

regional on-street off-street map

(Click the image to enlarge, or see this zoomable PDF or web version.)

This map has a similar motivation, McTighe said: helping every jurisdiction make sure their blue lines line up.

“We want to always be emphasizing that if Portland is putting in a buffered bike lane on, like, Division, then we want that bicycling and pedestrian improvements to extend all the way through to Gresham, or have some sort of meaningful connection as it weaves through,” McTighe said.

The new Regional Active Transportation Plan is a landmark document, and this vision is just a piece of it. You can learn more about it, and download all the analysis of these maps, here.

The post A region can dream: The metro area’s vision for its future path network appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Planning starts on west-side path network’s missing link: Hillsboro to Banks

Planning starts on west-side path network’s missing link: Hillsboro to Banks

Map from Metro showing proposed alignment of
Council Creek Regional Trail.

As the metro area’s rugged east side races to build its recreational bike network, the gentler, flatter west side is showing how persistence (and a steady stream of money) can pay off.

The farmland west and north of Hillsboro would get a 15-mile off-road paved path connecting the Hillsboro Central MAX station directly to the Banks-Vernonia Trail, making one of the region’s easiest bike-to-nature trips even easier, under a plan that’s starting to roll forward this month.

Planners will sketch possible routes for the future Council Creek Regional Trail at an public open house in late spring or early summer, Forest Grove civil engineer Derek Robbins said in an interview Wednesday.

“It’s going to be huge,” Robbins said. “Everybody’s going to want to come over to ride their bike.”

Like other regional trails, the path will vary from 12 to 14 feet wide and will be great for walking, running and skating too. In addition to Banks-Vernonia, it’ll link users to the Crown-Zellerbach Trail that connects the Vernonia area to the Scappoose area, and maybe one day to the proposed Salmonberry Corridor to the Oregon coast.

Here’s a general description of the route from a relevant planning document, which would also be likely to connect with Cornelius and Forest Grove, creating an excellent east-west bike commuting route through Washington County.

The corridor lies astride a single major east/west road, Highway 8, which runs from Beaverton, through Hillsboro, and Cornelius to terminate in Forest Grove. Highway 8 is basically a 4 lane facility with sections of dual, 2 lane couplets in the cities. Level of service on Highway 8 remains acceptable, except during peak hours, but continued growth will eventually lead to congestion. Expansion options are limited, as there are no other continuous east/west streets in the corridor. Highway 47 runs north/south through Forest Grove and into Banks, and could potentially cross the corridor.

The corridor is also near two railroads. The railroad line north of Highway 8, which has the closest tie to this corridor, is the former Oregon Electric Forest Grove Branch, which runs from Hillsboro to Forest Grove and the ROW is owned by ODOT. Only minimal local freight is currently operating. The Forest Grove Light Rail extension is currently being planned in this ROW.

The planning so far is being paid for by federal flexible transportation funds. There’s no funding source associated with the construction itself yet, a $104 million endeavor that Robbins expects will happen in phases.

“There’s lots of opportunities and lots of options,” Robbins said.

City teams up with ODOT to pave new section of Columbia Slough Trail

City teams up with ODOT to pave new section of Columbia Slough Trail

New section of Columbia Slough path-3

New path on the Columbia Slough at Vancouver Ave entrance.
(Photos © J. Maus/BikePortland)

The Oregon Department of Transportation and the Portland Parks & Recreation Bureau have teamed up to open a major new biking and walking path along the Columbia Slough in north Portland. The path — which has just been paved between N Denver and Vancouver avenues — is known as the Columbia Slough Trail.

The new path is about 10-feet wide with gravel shoulders and it hugs the Columbia Slough for about 1.2 miles. It offers access to lots of wildlife (tons of birds) and views of Mt. St. Helens, Mt. Adams, and Mt. Hood. From the path you can also see the Portland Meadows racetrack and watch big tractors and trucks at work on several industrial sites (I mention this for those of you with little ones). In addition to entry points at Vancouver and Denver avenues, there’s also a spur out to N Schmeer at Whitaker Road. This creates a much-needed connection for north Portland residents who frequent the Hayden Meadows shopping area (which includes a big hardware store among other things).

I rolled out there today and took a bunch of photos…

New section of Columbia Slough path-24

At the Vancouver Ave entrance there’s a nice flat grassy spot for picnics and relaxing.
New section of Columbia Slough path-26

Smooooth
New section of Columbia Slough path-5

New section of Columbia Slough path-6

Right on the water.
New section of Columbia Slough path-7

Portland Meadows racetrack in the background.

New section of Columbia Slough path-9

Mt. St. Helens.
New section of Columbia Slough path-12

Riding west toward I-5 and the Schmeer/Whitaker Road entry.
New section of Columbia Slough path-13

I-5 is just above and Schmeer Road is to the right.
New section of Columbia Slough path-14

Looking north at the Schmeer Road entrance. The road in the upper right is Whitaker, which takes you to the Hayden Meadows shopping center and other destinations.
New section of Columbia Slough path-15

Under I-5!
New section of Columbia Slough path-16

Here’s how it comes into the Denver/Schmeer/MAX Yellow Line intersection.
New section of Columbia Slough path-17

New section of Columbia Slough path-18

Now looking east while standing on Denver Ave. That’s Schmeer Road in the foreground, which will eventually be closed to auto use by ODOT and connect this path with others.
New section of Columbia Slough path-20

Lots of heron and geese and ducks and other birds.
New section of Columbia Slough path-21

Mt. Hood.
New section of Columbia Slough path-23

Mt. Adams.

The project cost an estimated $610,000 and about $460,000 was paid for by ODOT as part of the Community Enhancement Fund from their I-5/Delta Park freeway widening project that began in 2002. (Another project ODOT paid for through that same fund was the road diet and bike lanes on N Rosa Parks Way that was completed in 2011.)

This new pathway is excellent news for north Portlanders! Using a combination of PBOT’s existing neighborhood greenways, the Columbia Blvd Path, the Peninsula Crossing Trail, and an already-paved (but pretty bumpy) portion of the Columbia Slough Trail just west of this new portion, riders can create a very nice, family-friendly loop that’s almost entirely on dedicated paths (I’ll share the loop details in a separate post).

And there’s more good news. This new path will connect beautifully to the upcoming changes ODOT has in store with their Denver Avenue project we told you about last week. That project will create a seamless, bike/walk only connection between the existing portions of the Columbia Slough Trail adjacent to PIR (west of Denver) and this new path by closing a section of Schmeer Road to auto use.

All of this adds up to some major improvements for biking along the slough and in north Portland in general. As the paths get more and more attention, the Columbia Slough path is becoming the north Portland version of the Springwater Corridor!

To learn more about what’s in store for this area and share your thoughts and feedback with ODOT, attend their open house tonight (10/22) in Kenton. More details here.

Reader story: "I hit a kid with my bike yesterday"

Reader story: "I hit a kid with my bike yesterday"

Shared path Waterfront Park-1

Bicycling on the paths in Waterfront Park is how many Portlanders get from point A to point B. But they’re also popular with tourists, people strolling during the lunch hour, jogging, and so on.


Southeast Portland resident Anthony Thompson is a courteous and cautious bike rider. He’s one of thousands of people who rely on the paths along the Willamette River to get them where they need to go every day. Anthony’s daily commute entails sharing the paths in Waterfront Park with a wide range of other types of users — from people walking, to all manner of human-powered vehicles.

Yesterday he experienced something that I’m sure all of us who have ridden these paths have thought about. I’ve decided to share his story in his words, because I think it highlights some very important issues (emphases are mine):

“I commute from the SE daily and ride the waterfront regularly. When I ride the waterfront I consciously keep my speed down and try and set a safe pace. I’m pretty much the slowest rider and I rarely pass another cyclist. Even so, I hit and almost ran over a little girl with my bike yesterday afternoon. I was riding along slowly, carefully avoiding pedestrians and then suddenly a little girl about 10 feet in front of me leaves her family and bolts for the seawall to look at the river.

Just before I came to a complete stop she collided with the front of my bike and fell to her knees. Her thigh was just about to go under my
chainring and crankset. Luckily she was able to jump up and run into her Dad’s arms. I threw my bike aside and rushed over to see if she
was OK. She was crying hysterically, and I felt more than horrible.

Thankfully after a couple minutes she stopped crying and other than a small bump on her forehead, and a grease imprint of my chainring on
her leg, she was OK. I apologized profusely. I think they were visiting from somewhere in Europe. What a horrible way to welcome this family to Portland.

What would of happened if I was going just a little bit faster? I kept playing through horrible alternate outcomes in my head. She could of hit her head on the ground, and suffered serious head/brain injuries. I could of gouged her eye out with my brake levers. What a miserable experience.

What I do know is that my slow rate of speed is what saved me and this little girl from something worse.”


Thank you for sharing this story Anthony.

So often, this issue is framed in a way that focuses on how people on bikes simply need to slow down and be more courteous to others. I agree that’s true; but what Anthony’s story illustrates is that even when someone on a bike is operating safely, the potential for this type of incident remains. This is yet another example of how inadequate bicycle access leads to unsafe conditions, and then the consequences of those conditions are then blamed on people who bike (sound familiar?).

The City of Portland missed a huge opportunity to create good bike access near Waterfront Park when they failed to create quality bikeway in the $10 million Naito Parkway rehab project. I have confidence if that project were designed a few years later, we would have a physically separated bikeway through the park today. Instead, people who choose to ride a bike are faced with two bad options: Ride among tourists and people strolling leisurely on the riverfront (as they should be); or ride in a 1990s-style, narrow bike lane on a high-speed, four lane auto thoroughfare. Many people choose the former because riding that close to auto traffic is very unpleasant.

The Bureau of Transportation knows these crowded paths are a big issue (a fatal collision on a popular path in Texas in 2010 added urgency). They’ve done some “Share the Path” outreach and education work and there’s an ongoing coalition of advocates and staff from PBOT and Portland Park & Recreation discussing the Waterfront path issues. (I’m trying to track down an update on that group’s work.)

I applaud the education efforts; but I am skeptical of how much impact they can have. Just like the issues on Broadway/Flint/Wheeler, education and even enforcement yield limited returns when the true culprit is poor facility design. Visitors from other countries and people who just bike to work and don’t pay attention to (or care) about City outreach efforts, will be hard to educate. We need to expand the width of these paths to handle more capacity and we need to separate people on foot from those using bicycles.

Vancouver BC does this on their waterfront:

Vancouver BC-City Ride-3.jpg

There’s more than enough room in Waterfront Park to build a new path.

Thankfully, PBOT is planning Portland’s first path that will separate walking and biking traffic on their South Waterfront Greenway Trail project. But the Waterfront is where we need help today.

Why don’t we approach this problem the same way we do when a portion of a freeway has safety and capacity issues? Safety and capacity are the key rationale for spending billions on the Columbia River Crossing, the I-5 widening at the Rose Quarter, the I-84 widening in east Portland, and so on. The Waterfront paths are non-motorized freeways. As such, they deserve the same engineering, financial, and political respect. Until they do, I’m afraid we will hear more stories like Anthony’s.

Reader story: "I hit a kid with my bike yesterday"

Reader story: "I hit a kid with my bike yesterday"

Shared path Waterfront Park-1

Bicycling on the paths in Waterfront Park is how many Portlanders get from point A to point B. But they’re also popular with tourists, people strolling during the lunch hour, jogging, and so on.


Southeast Portland resident Anthony Thompson is a courteous and cautious bike rider. He’s one of thousands of people who rely on the paths along the Willamette River to get them where they need to go every day. Anthony’s daily commute entails sharing the paths in Waterfront Park with a wide range of other types of users — from people walking, to all manner of human-powered vehicles.

Yesterday he experienced something that I’m sure all of us who have ridden these paths have thought about. I’ve decided to share his story in his words, because I think it highlights some very important issues (emphases are mine):

“I commute from the SE daily and ride the waterfront regularly. When I ride the waterfront I consciously keep my speed down and try and set a safe pace. I’m pretty much the slowest rider and I rarely pass another cyclist. Even so, I hit and almost ran over a little girl with my bike yesterday afternoon. I was riding along slowly, carefully avoiding pedestrians and then suddenly a little girl about 10 feet in front of me leaves her family and bolts for the seawall to look at the river.

Just before I came to a complete stop she collided with the front of my bike and fell to her knees. Her thigh was just about to go under my
chainring and crankset. Luckily she was able to jump up and run into her Dad’s arms. I threw my bike aside and rushed over to see if she
was OK. She was crying hysterically, and I felt more than horrible.

Thankfully after a couple minutes she stopped crying and other than a small bump on her forehead, and a grease imprint of my chainring on
her leg, she was OK. I apologized profusely. I think they were visiting from somewhere in Europe. What a horrible way to welcome this family to Portland.

What would of happened if I was going just a little bit faster? I kept playing through horrible alternate outcomes in my head. She could of hit her head on the ground, and suffered serious head/brain injuries. I could of gouged her eye out with my brake levers. What a miserable experience.

What I do know is that my slow rate of speed is what saved me and this little girl from something worse.”


Thank you for sharing this story Anthony.

So often, this issue is framed in a way that focuses on how people on bikes simply need to slow down and be more courteous to others. I agree that’s true; but what Anthony’s story illustrates is that even when someone on a bike is operating safely, the potential for this type of incident remains. This is yet another example of how inadequate bicycle access leads to unsafe conditions, and then the consequences of those conditions are then blamed on people who bike (sound familiar?).

The City of Portland missed a huge opportunity to create good bike access near Waterfront Park when they failed to create quality bikeway in the $10 million Naito Parkway rehab project. I have confidence if that project were designed a few years later, we would have a physically separated bikeway through the park today. Instead, people who choose to ride a bike are faced with two bad options: Ride among tourists and people strolling leisurely on the riverfront (as they should be); or ride in a 1990s-style, narrow bike lane on a high-speed, four lane auto thoroughfare. Many people choose the former because riding that close to auto traffic is very unpleasant.

The Bureau of Transportation knows these crowded paths are a big issue (a fatal collision on a popular path in Texas in 2010 added urgency). They’ve done some “Share the Path” outreach and education work and there’s an ongoing coalition of advocates and staff from PBOT and Portland Park & Recreation discussing the Waterfront path issues. (I’m trying to track down an update on that group’s work.)

I applaud the education efforts; but I am skeptical of how much impact they can have. Just like the issues on Broadway/Flint/Wheeler, education and even enforcement yield limited returns when the true culprit is poor facility design. Visitors from other countries and people who just bike to work and don’t pay attention to (or care) about City outreach efforts, will be hard to educate. We need to expand the width of these paths to handle more capacity and we need to separate people on foot from those using bicycles.

Vancouver BC does this on their waterfront:

Vancouver BC-City Ride-3.jpg

There’s more than enough room in Waterfront Park to build a new path.

Thankfully, PBOT is planning Portland’s first path that will separate walking and biking traffic on their South Waterfront Greenway Trail project. But the Waterfront is where we need help today.

Why don’t we approach this problem the same way we do when a portion of a freeway has safety and capacity issues? Safety and capacity are the key rationale for spending billions on the Columbia River Crossing, the I-5 widening at the Rose Quarter, the I-84 widening in east Portland, and so on. The Waterfront paths are non-motorized freeways. As such, they deserve the same engineering, financial, and political respect. Until they do, I’m afraid we will hear more stories like Anthony’s.