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New Seasons on Williams Ave pays undisclosed sum for 47 more auto parking spaces

New Seasons on Williams Ave pays undisclosed sum for 47 more auto parking spaces

Parking at New Seasons on Williams

A sign at New Seasons Market on Williams Avenue.
(Photos: J. Maus/BikePortland)

The costs of “free” parking have been hidden inside the price of almost everything we buy, but it’s rare to see an example as straightforward as this one.

The New Seasons Market on Williams Avenue, which like virtually every grocery store in the city doesn’t charge you to park a car on their property, recently started renting 47 parking spaces from an apartment building across Ivy Street that charges $175 a month for resident parking.

New Seasons won’t disclose what it’s paying to rent the new spaces — “we keep our real estate transactions confidential,” spokeswoman Mea Irving said Wednesday — but if they were paying the same $175 per month as residents, those 47 spaces would cost $98,700 a year.

They’ll bring the total to 102 auto parking spaces and 112 bike parking spaces for the 30,000-square-foot store, all of them nominally free to use.

“The amount of parking spaces we’ll have at this store with these additional spots is in line with the amount of parking that we offer at our other locations,” Irving said.







Parking at New Seasons on Williams

New Seasons occupies a one-story building on NE Fremont between Williams and Vancouver.
parking at new seasons

Across from the entrace of New Seasons are the new Cook Street Apartments — and a banner announcing the new parking spaces.

That’s an impressive amount of bike parking for a grocery store anywhere, and Portland-based New Seasons is better than most U.S. grocers in avoiding excess amounts of auto parking. Also, it’s likely that if New Seasons hadn’t shelled out for the overflow parking space, it would have faced a political pressure from its neighbors. People would simply park cars on nearby streets, as many do for Zupan’s Market on Southeast Belmont (about 30 on-site auto parking spaces, shared with the apartments upstairs) or Trader Joe’s on Northwest Glisan (about 40 on-site auto parking spaces).

The only way New Seasons could avoid building its parking costs into the price of its groceries would be to charge people for parking — that’d discourage more people from driving there unless they really needed to. But paid parking isn’t really an option for New Seasons, because the City of Portland offers free parking on all the surrounding streets; even more people would spill into the surrounding area.

Zupan’s and Trader Joe’s are proof that the grocery business doesn’t collapse if customers have to walk a little ways to a car trunk. But when it comes to charging for car parking, grocery stores’ hands have been tied by a city that refuses to charge for use of public space along its curbs. Every other outcome — including a few unnecessary cents on every grocery bill — flows from there.

— Michael Andersen, (503) 333-7824 – michael@bikeportland.org

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The post New Seasons on Williams Ave pays undisclosed sum for 47 more auto parking spaces appeared first on BikePortland.org.

A roundup of Portland’s best bike-themed April Fools jokes

A roundup of Portland’s best bike-themed April Fools jokes

Lead-Image

New Seasons on Williams now offers complimentary bike valet service (with optional cuddling).

BikePortland doesn’t do April Fools jokes. We just don’t. But that doesn’t mean we don’t appreciate them and we’re certainly not above highlight them.

Portland did very well today with bike-themed April Fools pranks. Even a non-bike business got into the act. Check out our roundup below and if you came across other good ones today, feel free to share them in the comments.

Bike Valet Service at New Seasons

New Seasons on Williams Avenue is probably the most bike-accessible grocery store in the entire city. Not only did the management staff go above and beyond to make sure there’s quality bike parking and even lockers inside the store specifically for bike gear, the store also happens to be located on Williams Avenue, the highest-traffic bike thoroughfare in Portland. That why we couldn’t help but smile when we heard they launched a bike valet service today.

Bicyclists frustrated with the time-intensive process of securing a spot and the constant game of tetris to secure the lock in a crowded bike corral can breathe a sigh of relief,” reads the copy on their website. “Now, you can drop off your wheels with our friendly attendant in exchange for a numbered ticket—and a coupon good for one free stem of dehydrated, then rehydrated kale, enjoyable at your leisure.” Not only with they park your bike but it’ll get a wash and polish with recycled rainwater and a lube job using “second-generation, gluten-free coconut oil.” Whether you roll up with a unicycle, tricycle, tandem or tall-bike, New Seasons guarantees “judgment free” and expert service.

Waterproof Breathable diapers from Showers Pass

Showers-Pass-Waterproof-Diaper-xl-banner

Portland-based apparel company Showers Pass had a massive success with their waterproof socks and jackets so now they’re tackling the most demanding product category in the market: waterproof diapers.

“For active babies on the go (who keep going and going), here is the most breathable, waterproof, long-term protection from accidents,” reads the website for their new Tech Diaper. Their team of apparel gurus has created a revolutionary new “diapering system” that uses, “dry-lock technology and a patent-pending Bio-gest pad with a motion-activated enzyme layer for in-diaper composting of excrement.” They promise a diaper life of up to 12 hours without skin irritation.

And of course the diapers come in colors that will match all the jackets your family likely already owns.

The Orp-LZR1 bike light, horn, and destructive laser combo

fools-orp

The “Smorn” light from Orp (a real product) is equal parts bright head light and loud noisemaker. Today the company unveiled a new model with an interesting add-on feature: two high-powered lasers that pack enough power to blow up anything on the road that gets in your way.

“No more being cut off by inconsiderate or clueless drivers without consequence!” said Orp’s founder Toren Orzeck. Oh, and even with the lasers the LZR1 is still USB rechargeable.

Cycle Oregon launches virtual reality option

virtual-oregon-600x600

Virtual Ride is the latest innovation from Cycle Oregon. If you’ve always wanted to do their famous Week Ride but couldn’t find the time, you can now experiencer it from the comfort of your own home with the COVR system (Cycle Oregon Virtual Ride). “That’s right, you can see the Steens, pedal the Painted Hills, and ride the rim of Crater Lake—all from your home trainer—with our special virtual reality package,” reads the website.

“Simply put on your VR headset and press play to start the ride. As you hit mileage checkpoints in the program, our special drone delivery service will bring you all the accouterments you’ve come to know on Cycle Oregon events. For instance, on Day 1 mile 13, our custom delivery drones will slather you with sunscreen, load your pockets with KIND bars, drop two fizzes in your water bottle, and even waft you with that special blue room scent—so authentic! They’ll also deliver all your meals and gear drop bags, and offer you chocolate milk at the end of your day.”

They even offer virtual sag service in case you can’t even complete the VR experience. Offer also includes all the festivities back at camp and the headset comes pre-loaded with live concerts from the Rolling Stones, Led Zepplin or Bruce Springsteen.

Ruckus’ latest will take the spring out of your ride

Ruckus Composites has always been an innovator. Their new Inanimate Carbon Tube (ICT) takes suspension design one step further — by rendering it completely rigid.

For just $500 you can, “Turn any full suspension mountain bike into a hard tail. Drop speed sucking rear suspension movement. Ride faster up every hill. Drop unnecessary weight. Relive the glory days.”

The ICT comes with an impressively wordsmithed list of features including: Hi-Modulus Unidirectional Carbon Fiber body; 3k Twill Weave Carbon Fiber Decals; CUSTOM 3d printed to fit every bike and a weight of just 80 grams.

Act fast because these amazing products are only available for another 10 hours or so (and actually even that long).

April Fools!

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

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The post A roundup of Portland’s best bike-themed April Fools jokes appeared first on BikePortland.org.

New Seasons customers visit new store — and park their cars in state’s new bike lane – UPDATED

New Seasons customers visit new store — and park their cars in state’s new bike lane – UPDATED

newseasonsparkinglead

Photos of cars parked in the bike lane in front of New Seasons on Lombard.
(Photos: ODOT)

A new grocery store opened in North Portland’s University Park neighborhood today. Unfortunately customers who arrived by bike saw their new bike lanes full of cars.

Late last fall the Oregon Department of Transportation striped new bike lanes on North Lombard, a rarity for a state highway. ODOT told us at the time that the major catalyst for the project was the new New Seasons Market that opened today at the corner of Lombard and Westanna. Officials felt the new market would attract a lot of traffic and many people would bike there (New Seasons has an excellent reputation as a place that welcomes bike riders). With no dedicated biking space on Lombard they feared conditions would be unsafe without a bike lane.

Turns out that, so far at least, it’s unsafe with a bike lane.

Based on a report and photos we’ve received from ODOT, it appears that many people think the bike lane is a parking lane. Either they are ignorant of the bike lane or they just plain don’t care that parking on one is dangerous, rude, and illegal.






This isn’t the first time New Seasons customers have parked in bike lanes. In 2011 we reported that people parked in the bike lanes on North Rosa Parks Way while shopping at the Arbor Lodge neighborhood store.

There are several things that could be done to avoid this. A more robust bikeway design with some sort of protective barrier would keep people from parking in it. So too might additional signage and/or more generous pavement markings. New Seasons can also educate their customers inside the store. I’m sure they use their in-store PA system to warn people who have left their lights on or who are blocking one of their food delivery trucks — perhaps they could also do the same to people who are blocking the bike lane. In Portland, that might result in enough shame and embarrassment to really change behavior.

As for ODOT, one of their staffers told us today that right now they just want to spread the word about the problem while they work to get some parking enforcement out on the street.

UPDATE, 3/24 at 12:00 pm: New Seasons spokeswoman Claudia Knotek called us and made the following statement via voicemail:

“We had no idea that this was going to be an issue. We should have known that the way the signage is presented it could be confusing for customers who don’t konw at what point the bike lane starts.

We are in contact with the city right now to see how fast we can get additional signage – whether it’s on the road itself showing another bike or signage on the side. In the meantime, New Seasons Market will go ahead and have signs made that we can post along there informing shoppers that this is indeed a bike lane and they cannot park there.

We really appreciated your help [getting the word out]. We are sorry this has happened and will make every effort to rectify it as soon as possible.”

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

BikePortland can’t survive without subscribers. It’s just $10 per month and you can sign up in a few minutes.

The post New Seasons customers visit new store — and park their cars in state’s new bike lane – UPDATED appeared first on BikePortland.org.

B-Line inks deal to deliver products to New Seasons stores

B-Line inks deal to deliver products to New Seasons stores

blinepic

Franklin Jones of B-Line on one of his delivery trikes.
(Photo by NashCO Photography, courtesy New Seasons Market)

Earth Day seems like a fitting day to announce the latest evolution in Portland’s cargo bike delivery ecosystem.

Pedal-powered freight delivery company B-Line has partnered with New Seasons Markets on a pilot project dubbed “Green Wheels” to deliver products to their stores.

Here’s more from an announcement by New Seasons:

The pilot program currently serves the Hawthorne and Division stores, with plans to expand to Concordia and Arbor Lodge, and Northwest Portland’s soon-to-launch Slabtown location.

A small selection of vendors is participating in the pilot, with potential for the roster to grow…

As for the near future, B-Line plans to open a North Portland hub to service the ultra-dense Killingsworth, Alberta and Mississippi neighborhoods, and will potentially take root within Ecotrust’s newly acquired warehouse in southeast Portland, The Redd, slated to operate as an urban food hub…

The idea is for B-Line to establish local distribution hubs that will accept products from New Seasons vendors. Then B-Line employees will pedal the freight to the individual stores.

Since the company’s launch in 2009, B-Line founder Franklin Jones has built his company into a viable and successful last-mile cargo delivery operation. His fleet of electrified cargo trikes can carry up to 600 pounds per load and currently deliver to over 200 local businesses, saving tens of thousands of truck trips every year.

We rely on financial support from readers like you.

New Seasons says the partnership will save their 150 local vendors — many of whom are small start-ups — from having to drive around in order to deliver their products to the company’s 14 metro area markets. “Streamlining the delivery process could mean hundreds of car trips avoided and less congestion on cramped urban streets,” New Seasons says, “along with freeing up a healthy chunk of precious time.”

This effort reminds us of what Rolling Oasis is doing with their planned expansion into new areas. That company is trying to raise money to establish delivery hubs in underserved neighborhoods. (Learn more about their plans on this fantastic recent episode of The Sprocket Podcast.)

Local delivery of food by cargo bike has so many upsides for our local economy, health, and planet. Congrats to these companies for seeing the future and working to do things differently — and better!

We’re following all the local cargo bike news, stay tuned for more coverage.

The post B-Line inks deal to deliver products to New Seasons stores appeared first on BikePortland.org.

B-Line inks deal to deliver products to New Seasons stores

B-Line inks deal to deliver products to New Seasons stores

blinepic

Franklin Jones of B-Line on one of his delivery trikes.
(Photo by NashCO Photography, courtesy New Seasons Market)

Earth Day seems like a fitting day to announce the latest evolution in Portland’s cargo bike delivery ecosystem.

Pedal-powered freight delivery company B-Line has partnered with New Seasons Markets on a pilot project dubbed “Green Wheels” to deliver products to their stores.

Here’s more from an announcement by New Seasons:

The pilot program currently serves the Hawthorne and Division stores, with plans to expand to Concordia and Arbor Lodge, and Northwest Portland’s soon-to-launch Slabtown location.

A small selection of vendors is participating in the pilot, with potential for the roster to grow…

As for the near future, B-Line plans to open a North Portland hub to service the ultra-dense Killingsworth, Alberta and Mississippi neighborhoods, and will potentially take root within Ecotrust’s newly acquired warehouse in southeast Portland, The Redd, slated to operate as an urban food hub…

The idea is for B-Line to establish local distribution hubs that will accept products from New Seasons vendors. Then B-Line employees will pedal the freight to the individual stores.

Since the company’s launch in 2009, B-Line founder Franklin Jones has built his company into a viable and successful last-mile cargo delivery operation. His fleet of electrified cargo trikes can carry up to 600 pounds per load and currently deliver to over 200 local businesses, saving tens of thousands of truck trips every year.

We rely on financial support from readers like you.

New Seasons says the partnership will save their 150 local vendors — many of whom are small start-ups — from having to drive around in order to deliver their products to the company’s 14 metro area markets. “Streamlining the delivery process could mean hundreds of car trips avoided and less congestion on cramped urban streets,” New Seasons says, “along with freeing up a healthy chunk of precious time.”

This effort reminds us of what Rolling Oasis is doing with their planned expansion into new areas. That company is trying to raise money to establish delivery hubs in underserved neighborhoods. (Learn more about their plans on this fantastic recent episode of The Sprocket Podcast.)

Local delivery of food by cargo bike has so many upsides for our local economy, health, and planet. Congrats to these companies for seeing the future and working to do things differently — and better!

We’re following all the local cargo bike news, stay tuned for more coverage.

The post B-Line inks deal to deliver products to New Seasons stores appeared first on BikePortland.org.

PBOT will make changes to three Williams Ave bike lane trouble spots

PBOT will make changes to three Williams Ave bike lane trouble spots

williams-stanton2

Because of a bad design coupled with dangerous and illegal behavior by some road users,
PBOT will move the bike lane over and add a median island at Williams and Stanton.
(Photo by J. Maus/BikePortland)

The “three-year journey” (to use the City of Portland’s phrase) to make North Williams Avenue work better for cycling isn’t quite over yet.

Even though they announced a month ago that construction on the project was all but complete, we’ve heard consistent concerns about three intersections in particular: Stanton, Cook, and Fremont. The good news is they’re working to address those trouble spots.

Last week I spotted the spray-painted lines of a re-positioned bike lane and a new median island at Stanton, so I inquired with PBOT Project Manager Rich Newlands to see if anything was up. Sure enough, he confirmed that a relatively major change is coming to that intersection, as well as more minor tweaks to the two other intersections.

Williams and Stanton (at Dawson Park)

williams-stanton

(PBOT change order document)
williams1

Notice the word “island” near the bike lane character.
(Photo by J. Maus/BikePortland)

We’ve already reported about the issues at this intersection. The problem here is that PBOT has not made it clear enough to road users that the left lane leading up to the intersection (prior to an existing median at N Graham) is left-turn only. Because there is zero signage or markings to that effect, many people use the lane illegally and with no intention of making the left turn at Stanton. As a result, they sit in the lane and try to merge back into the single standard travel lane to continue north. Instead of waiting to merge, some people simply drive in the bike-only lane. The other problem is that the bike lane at Stanton veers too drastically the right (in order to preserve room for an auto-parking lane adjacent to Dawson Park). This jog in the bike lane puts riders in the direct path of people illegally attempting to merge with their cars into the right lane.

N Williams at Stanton-2

All the cars in the left lane here are in violation of the law, but they might not even know it because there’s such a lack of signage.
(Photo by J. Maus/BikePortland)

To fix this problem, PBOT is planning two things: They’ll re-stripe the bike lane so it doesn’t jog so much to the right and they’ll install a new median island. Newlands says the island aims to, “prevent right merging traffic from using the bike lane for merge space.” The new island will be similar to the existing ones in the left one between Beech and Skidmore.

In addition, PBOT plans on adding more signage prior to the existing median at Graham in order to “send a stronger message” (says Newslands) that the left lane is for left turns only. There will be two, “Thru Traffic Merge Right” signs and two, “Left Lane Must Turn Left” signs.

Williams and Cook

williams-cook

(PBOT change order document)

The Cook intersection has been a mess for months now. This is a major feeder of Williams traffic thanks to it being an outlet from Interstate 405. There was a delay in getting a new traffic signal up and running, and the new bike lane here is just five feet wide — the most narrow of anywhere else in the project. Add in the constant stress of nearby construction and the fact that the bike lane is sandwiched between two standard lanes and it doesn’t feel like much of an improvement over the old design.

To help bulk up the bike lane here, PBOT plans to add some green paint.

Williams and Fremont (New Seasons)

williams-fremont

(PBOT change order document)

This is the block face (between Ivy and Fremont) adjacent to New Seasons Market. It’s a very busy area, and once again the new design requires people using cars to cross over the bikeway to access a left-turn pocket to go west at Fremont. Back in December there was a collision in this location.

According to their design drawings, PBOT plans to add green paint to the entire bike lane from Ivy to Fremont.

All of these changes should be completed by the end of this week. Let us know how they work for you and we’ll keep sending feedback to PBOT until we get this right.

The post PBOT will make changes to three Williams Ave bike lane trouble spots appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Changes to bike parking at New Seasons Market in Arbor Lodge

Changes to bike parking at New Seasons Market in Arbor Lodge

New Seasons Arbor Lodge bike parking-2

Riding your bike to New Seasons Market in Arbor Lodge is now even easier with a new on-street bike corral and rear entrance on N. Holman.
(Photos by J. Maus/BikePortland)

New Seasons Arbor Lodge bike parking-1

No more racks under the fish.

Last weekend I was a bit miffed when I rolled into my local New Seasons Market and noticed the bike parking at the main front entrance had been completely removed. After years of parking my bike there, it was a case of “Dude, where’s my bike parking?!”

About seven or so city-issued blue staple racks had been removed. This is a very busy store and these racks were nearly always at capacity, so I wondered what was up. Now it turns out that — in a not surprising development given their bike-friendliness — New Seasons had a plan all along.

According to New Seasons operations manager Elizabeth Nardi, the company is simply tweaking its bike parking arrangement based on customer feedback and lessons they’ve learned from their new store on North Williams Avenue. Nardi said customers at the Arbor Lodge Store have requested covered bike parking so New Seasons now has new some covered racks on the west side of the store (on Interstate Avenue).

Nardi didn’t say that the racks were removed to make more room for the ever-expanding floral department; but it’s clear that the space is needed for store operations and the removal of the racks will alleviate crowding at the front of the store.

New Seasons Arbor Lodge bike parking-3

New entrance adjacent to new bike parking.

But the biggest news for Arbor Lodge New Seasons customers is the new on-street bike corral on Holman and the new entrance and checkout register at the south side of the store. The new bike corral and rear entry is excellent for bicycling customers on many levels: the parking allows people to roll right into a secure staple rack without having to mix with people walking on sidewalks; the use of the rear entry means bike riders don’t have to contend with a busy parking lot on the Rosa Parks Way side of the store; and since bike riding customers tend to buy fewer items per trip, they can now grab and go quickly by using the rear entrance and new cash register.

Nardi says New Seasons has more plans to “enliven” the corner of Interstate and Holman, and new chairs and tables are on the way.

While I’d prefer to still have the racks right up front near the main entrance (I’d sometimes leave my 8-year-old next to my bike while I ran in to pick something up, which I’d never do at the new rear entrance), overall it feels like New Seasons has once again demonstrated respect and sensitivity to their bicycling customers.

What do you think of the changes?

Disclaimer: New Seasons Market is a BikePortland advertiser.

Changes to bike parking at New Seasons Market in Arbor Lodge

Changes to bike parking at New Seasons Market in Arbor Lodge

New Seasons Arbor Lodge bike parking-2

Riding your bike to New Seasons Market in Arbor Lodge is now even easier with a new on-street bike corral and rear entrance on N. Holman.
(Photos by J. Maus/BikePortland)

New Seasons Arbor Lodge bike parking-1

No more racks under the fish.

Last weekend I was a bit miffed when I rolled into my local New Seasons Market and noticed the bike parking at the main front entrance had been completely removed. After years of parking my bike there, it was a case of “Dude, where’s my bike parking?!”

About seven or so city-issued blue staple racks had been removed. This is a very busy store and these racks were nearly always at capacity, so I wondered what was up. Now it turns out that — in a not surprising development given their bike-friendliness — New Seasons had a plan all along.

According to New Seasons operations manager Elizabeth Nardi, the company is simply tweaking its bike parking arrangement based on customer feedback and lessons they’ve learned from their new store on North Williams Avenue. Nardi said customers at the Arbor Lodge Store have requested covered bike parking so New Seasons now has new some covered racks on the west side of the store (on Interstate Avenue).

Nardi didn’t say that the racks were removed to make more room for the ever-expanding floral department; but it’s clear that the space is needed for store operations and the removal of the racks will alleviate crowding at the front of the store.

New Seasons Arbor Lodge bike parking-3

New entrance adjacent to new bike parking.

But the biggest news for Arbor Lodge New Seasons customers is the new on-street bike corral on Holman and the new entrance and checkout register at the south side of the store. The new bike corral and rear entry is excellent for bicycling customers on many levels: the parking allows people to roll right into a secure staple rack without having to mix with people walking on sidewalks; the use of the rear entry means bike riders don’t have to contend with a busy parking lot on the Rosa Parks Way side of the store; and since bike riding customers tend to buy fewer items per trip, they can now grab and go quickly by using the rear entrance and new cash register.

Nardi says New Seasons has more plans to “enliven” the corner of Interstate and Holman, and new chairs and tables are on the way.

While I’d prefer to still have the racks right up front near the main entrance (I’d sometimes leave my 8-year-old next to my bike while I ran in to pick something up, which I’d never do at the new rear entrance), overall it feels like New Seasons has once again demonstrated respect and sensitivity to their bicycling customers.

What do you think of the changes?

Disclaimer: New Seasons Market is a BikePortland advertiser.

New Seasons Market addresses traffic safety concern on Vancouver Ave

New Seasons Market addresses traffic safety concern on Vancouver Ave

New Seasons Market at Vancouver and Ivy

After hearing about one collision and one near-miss, New Seasons Market has responded to bike safety concerns at their parking lot exit onto Vancouver Ave.
(Photo © J. Maus/BikePortland)

Now that New Seasons Market has opened on a busy block of the N Vancouver/Williams couplet, we weren’t surprised when a reader emailed us about a traffic safety concern. The streets on both sides of the new store were already busy thoroughfares for buses, bikes, and cars — so adding in the traffic of a popular grocery store was almost certain to raise some issues.

Surprisingly, we haven’t heard any feedback about the Williams Avenue side, where scores of people on bikes merge over two lanes of auto traffic to reach the store during the evening rush hour. We have however, heard about the Vancouver side.

A reader named Aaron G. got in touch with us last week to share his harrowing experience:

“I was riding my bike South on Vancouver and was nearly T-boned hard by a car shooting out of your parking lot, across Vancouver, onto Ivy St. It was dusk and I had a flashing headlamp, a front light, and was wearing light colors. I had to scream and brake as hard as I could and we ended up wheel-to-wheel, thankfully no one hurt.

So it seems that some patrons are trying to leave store by crossing 3 lanes of traffic on Vancouver to shoot into Ivy St. [see lead photo]. This is dangerous when they might be focusing on only waiting for cars to pass, and might not see the bikes obscured by the cars shooting by.”

Further down the road that same day he was nearly hit, Aaron spoke to another person who was biking behind him. Turns out that person had “gone over someone’s hood” at that very same spot a few weeks prior. This made Aaron even more concerned about the situation and he decided to notify New Seasons to hopefully do something to prevent anyone else from getting hurt.

A few days later, Aaron received a response from New Seasons’ Customer Advocate Daniel Menasche. Menasche said they’ve got both short and long-term solutions in mind to improve traffic safety around the store. He pointed out the existing sandwich-board signs that encourage people to “Share the Road” and said they’ve partnered with the City and other businesses to install a new traffic signal at N Cook, which is one block south of Ivy. “Though this may not do so much to help with our parking lot exit,” Menasche wrote to Aaron, “it should keep cyclists a lot safer about 100 feet down the road, where I myself have had a lot of close calls with the sort of “darters” you described.”

However, since that new traffic signal is still at least one year away, and sandwich board signs don’t really do much to influence behaviors, New Seasons decided to order new traffic signage immediately to deal with the issue Aaron brought to their attention.

New Seasons Operations Manager Elizabeth Nardi said she has purchased two new signs that will face the store’s westbound parking lot exit. The signs are standard, yellow caution signs exactly like the ones below…

Hopefully these new signs will help drivers be more attentive to the presence of bicycle riders.

Thanks for sharing your story Aaron. It’s great to see that yet again New Seasons has responded quickly to bike access issues.

Disclaimer: New Seasons Market pays for advertising on BikePortland.

Williams Avenue New Seasons moves staples to improve bike parking

Williams Avenue New Seasons moves staples to improve bike parking

bike parking at New Seasons -8

Bike staples at the North Williams and Fremont
New Seasons were torn up so they could
be moved further from the wall.
(Photo © J. Maus/BikePortland)

It’s always nice to see a retailer going the extra mile to improve their bike-friendliness, and for us, it’s even nicer when the business was alerted to the problem by BikePortland commenters.

In this case, the action is coming from grocer New Seasons, which is tearing up and reinstalling a set of bike staples that turned out to be too close to its new building on North Williams.

“Your blog commenters were right on so we asked the architect/builder to review the install of the racks,” New Seasons spokeswoman Elizabeth Nardi wrote in an email Tuesday morning. “The person installing the staples had them too close to the building. They needed to get new hardware, but they will be reinstalled shortly at the correct distance from the building. Pretty incredible your readers were able to spot that mistake from the picture.”

Kudos to sharp-eyed commenter Todd Hudson and the other readers who publicly workshopped this problem beneath our post last week, and to New Seasons for understanding how important bike-friendliness will be to the success of their new location.