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Fun for everybody! A 7-point action plan for a more diverse Pedalpalooza

Fun for everybody! A 7-point action plan for a more diverse Pedalpalooza

2014 Bike Fair-27

At the Multnomah County Bike Fair, 2014.
(Photos: J.Maus/BikePortland)

This post is by columnist Taz Loomans.

Not long ago, I thought more bike lanes would save the world. In fact, my passion for a better environment for bicyclists and pedestrians was one of the reasons I moved to Portland.

Since then I’ve become disillusioned with the bike advocacy movement, largely because of its lack of racial and ethnic diversity.

According to the recent CNN article by comedian/activist W. Kamau Bell, called Gentrifying Portland: A tale of two cities, “Portland is 76 percent white. That’s a lot, for two reasons. 1) According to the 2010 census, the United States is 72% white, so Portland is whiter than America. 2) Portland is considered a major city. And we don’t associate major cities with whiteness,” he says.

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Taz Loomans.

I never associated the bike and ped advocacy movement with whiteness until I moved to Portland. I always assumed that progressive policies like better bike infrastructure and racial diversity would go hand in hand. But that’s not necessarily true, as I’ve learned in Portland.

“As non-diverse as Portland is, the typical bike fun ride is even less diverse ethnically, unfortunately,” admits bike fun organizer Chris McCraw.

Carl Larson, a fellow bike advocate, echoes this point. “There still seems to be a lack of racial and ethnic diversity in Portland’s bike fun,” he said. “More so than in the city’s biking population as a whole.”

The problem is not that people of color aren’t interested in bike infrastructure.

“Bike infrastructure is critical,” said Sam Baraso, a co-leader of the Environmental Professionals of Color and a senior policy analyst at Multnomah County. “It goes a long way to making cyclists’ daily commutes that much safer. While I’m plenty vigilant, I feel much more confident and safer biking here than other places I’ve cycled.”

“Bike infrastructure is super important to me,” said Kirk Rea, volunteer coordinator at The City Repair Project. “At the highest level, I see bike use as a powerful green technology that can reduce our negative impact on our environment. At smaller scales, bike infrastructure has the benefits of recreation, or play, and can help our health or livability. As people of color we need as many pro-health options as possible, as we statistically have higher rates of chronic illnesses such as heart disease and diabetes.”

Yet people of color seem largely absent from bike fun — a major outlet of bike activism. So what? you might ask. How is race even an issue in bike advocacy anyway?

2014 Bike Fair-10

Carl Larson.

Larson reminds us that “bike fun isn’t just fun, it’s a powerful advocacy tool, too. If [bike fun] events were more diverse, we would likely see faster, better supported, and more equitable changes to our streets.”

Rujuta Gaonkar, Program Manager of the Health Equity Initiative at Multnomah County Health Department, said race matters in bike advocacy because “when I think about all that I’ve heard with the bike lanes that went in on N. Williams, it’s clear that the people living in the corridor, who are some of the most significantly impacted by the changes that resulted from putting in bike lanes, weren’t even consulted when that endeavour was taken. How can the movement adequately take into consideration how biking and relationships to biking might look different in different communities if it is overwhelmingly white?”

“Infrastructure and equity in active transportation go hand in hand,” said Lale Santelices, the Community Cycling Center’s former collaborations manager. “The people and places that would benefit from more transportation options are often times the people and places that have less access to options and live in the most remote areas of the city.”

Rea agrees and says that “People of color have typically been left out of decision making when it comes to urban development, even when our neighborhoods are affected, and thus have experienced gentrification. Further developments need to be installed with care if we are to buy in.” Without a racially diverse group of people at the decision-making table, the bike advocacy movement won’t be able to serve diverse communities effectively.







Because Portland as a city is so white, cultivating diversity in any advocacy movement is hard work, but not impossible. The first step is to recognize the problem and acknowledge that not all is well. As Bell writes about Portland — and what can be said about bike advocacy in Portland — “Everything looks right, but something is definitely wrong.” McCraw agrees. “I think we have a lot of things to work on [in bike fun] – inclusion of younger and older riders as well as poorer and richer, and non-white,” he said.

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Hammercise Ride, 2010.

The second step is to talk about it. One of the biggest hurdles I’ve found in Portland is the lack of willingness to openly talk about race issues among the white population. Noticing the lack of racial diversity in bike advocacy and bike fun and talking about it is an essential first step in making a change.

The third step is to take responsibility. Portland faces a unique problem with race because it is generally very liberal and progressive in its politics yet it lacks in racial diversity. Because of this juxtaposition, there tends to be some amount of passivity among the white liberal population about racial and ethnic diversity.

Bell writes, “Almost to a person they had the same type of reaction when I brought up Portland’s (to me) shocking lack of diversity. It was something to the effect of…Hipster – “YAY, PORTLAND!” Me – “Where are all the black people?” Hipster – “Oh yeah” Hipster looks down at their feet until I go away.”

Seven things anybody can do to help

mujeres en movimiento

Carolina Iraheta Gonzalez, Lale Santelices and Elizabeth Quiroz get ready for Mujeres en Movimiento’s ‘Sundress Sunday’ ride.
(Photo: M.Andersen/BikePortland)

The only way to make progress around the issue of diversity in bike advocacy is to take responsibility for it and actively recruit people of color into bike advocacy and bike fun. Which leads me to the next step.

Take action! Here are seven ways how you can be active about bringing racial and ethnic diversity to your next bike ride or bike advocacy effort:

1. Baraso suggests: “Build relationships with people of color organizations, and do so long before you have something [like a bike ride] in mind so that it comes out of the relationship.” Rea emphasizes that “Leaders from various communities need to be at planning tables with leaders of bike fun.”

2. Priti Shah, Finance Director and Event Coordinator at The City Repair Project suggests: “Have signage in different languages. Make promo materials (photos, videos) of people of color on bikes. Help organizations that work with diverse ethnicities organize a bike ride/bike tour.”

2014 Bike Fair-5

At the Multnomah County Bike Fair, 2014.

3. “Partner with folks in marginalized communities to lead a ride more appealing to non-white-young-CIS-male demographics. I’m thinking things like a SOUL district ride, a ride to the Juneteenth parade, and one that is already on the Pedalpalooza calendar – the refugee ride,” says McCraw.

4. Watch who’s on your invite list. According to the 2010 census, 19.5% of Oregon’s 2014 population over the age of 18 identify as non-white. A good guideline to check if your ride is representative of the general population is to see if about 20% of your invite list includes non-whites. If you’re having trouble reaching this number, it’s time to become proactive and reach out to communities of color through organizations like – Coalition of Communities of Color, Center for Intercultural Organizing, Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon, African American Health Coalition, Immigrant & Refugee Community Organization, Latino Network, and Native American Youth and Family Center, among others, to get the word out about your bike ride to different communities.

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At the Thursday Night Ride, 2016.

5. Larson suggests that people start rides in more racially diverse areas of town. “Don’t start everything at Col. Summers Park, Salmon Springs Fountain, and Velo Cult. If you want to encourage a more diverse crowd to attend your event, consider starting it in a more diverse place like St. Johns, Lents or even Beaverton!”

6. Watch the cliquiness. Often you have to be in the know to feel accepted at bike fun events and people who aren’t aren’t always made to feel welcome. Santalices says that sometimes it feels like “you need to have all the gear, you have to know all the unspoken rules or you feel publicly shamed.”

And Larsen cautions against shaming people for wearing lycra or driving to bike fun events, which can exclude people of color that live in faraway communities. “Giving people a hard time for wearing lycra or driving a car can overlook the cultural and practical reasons people might have for doing both. It’s true: you don’t need special clothes for biking and bikes work great for most errands. It’s also true that some people, including many new immigrants, see biking as a symbol of recently-escaped poverty. They might only bike in lycra because they want community members to know “I’m doing this for fun! …not because I have to,” he says.

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At the Thursday Night Ride, 2016.

7. To make your bike ride more inclusive, don’t forget to go slow or have a sweep at the end of your rides. Rides that are aimed at experienced cyclists capable of doing long distances and going fast are great. But there are a lot of bike rides that aren’t about that, but sometimes bike ride leaders forget that not everyone is as experienced as they are. People new to biking or people who aren’t practiced riders may feel left behind at many rides, so it pays to go slow and have a sweep for those folks.

“If you are a privileged white man, there is nothing wrong with that,” said homeless advocate Ibrahim Mubarak said at the Reclaiming Space Confronting Oppression & Reclaiming Space panel at the 2016 Village Building Convergence. “It matters how you use that privilege. Do you use it to demean and oppress? Or do you use it to uplift?”

Will the current bike advocacy community use its privilege to direct its energy at the same old overwhelmingly white consituency? Or will it use it to actively recruit and seek out inclusion, diversity and equity?

Anti-CRC event at Crank Bicycles-6

Taz Loomans is BikePortland’s subversiveness columnist. Read her introductory column here.

The post Fun for everybody! A 7-point action plan for a more diverse Pedalpalooza appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Blast from the past: BikeTV visits Pedalpalooza in 2005

Blast from the past: BikeTV visits Pedalpalooza in 2005

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Live from 2005.
(Image: BikeTV)

These days, many people know Clarence Eckerson as the guy behind Streetfilms, the beautifully produced series of web videos about livable streets and transportation reform.

But back in 2005, he was honing those skills as the creator of BikeTV, a local cable show in New York City — and he happened to stop in Portland for the Multnomah County Bike Fair that closed the fourth annual Pedalpalooza festival. Eckerson wrote us today to mention that he was recently uploading some old DVDs, came across the footage below and thought we’d enjoy it.

The Portland coverage starts about one minute in, after the show’s opening montage. Clarence documents Timo Forsberg’s marriage to his bicycle; talks to artist Carye Bye about the definition of the unfamiliar word “bikey”; shows a performance of the Sprockettes; and more.







After Eckerson’s visit to the Bike Fair, he takes a trip to Seattle to talk to (current Portland-area resident) Todd Boulanger about bike parking, then hops back to Portland for a somewhat experimental sequence featuring Ken Southerland’s driveway and then joins Shawn Granton for a bike tour of classic east-side theaters.

As this year’s Pedalpalooza ramps up, it’s a window into a past when the festival was a little smaller and a little looser. Here’s to a city that will continue to change and discover new things about its future and its past.

— Michael Andersen, (503) 333-7824 – michael@bikeportland.org

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7 things to know for a great Bowie Vs Prince ride

7 things to know for a great Bowie Vs Prince ride

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Ride co-leaders Lillian Karabaic and Tim Nakayama at last year’s Bowie Vs Prince.
(Photos: Lillian Karabaic)

The recent deaths of rock titans David Bowie and Prince have had a unique impact on Portland because of the beloved tradition of the Bowie Vs Prince ride. The woman who created the ride, Lillian Karabaic, sent us a few last-minute reminders before it rolls for the last time this Saturday (6/11) at 7:00 pm.

For the 9th and final time, Bowie Vs Prince will ride tomorrow through the streets of Portland. For some folks, they’ve never missed this ride, and for others, it will be their first time. Below are a few things to keep in mind before you roll out on Saturday night…

1. Best things to Bring for Dancing in The Streets

Bring snacks, water, lights, a bike lock, your ID and your dancing shoes. If you can, bring a candle for a memorial. If you usually hit bed early, I’d recommend a disco nap in the evening, as this ride will go late.

Special stickers have been made for this year's ride.

Special stickers have been made for this year’s ride.

2. Major Tom to Ground Kontrol

Team Prince starts at Sewallcrest Park (SE 31st and Market) and will meet up quickly with Team Bowie, who starts at Holladay Park (NE 11th and Multnomah). It’s totally okay to start at a different start point than your “allegience” – we’re all friends here. The ride route will be posted day of, but will loop through innner SE to downtown, and end in Sellwood. You’ll love the end party with dancing, karaoke, a costume contest, and a photobooth, so stay til the end if you can (beverages available, cards and cash accepted.) You catch up with the ride by following @anomalily or @dirtydiablorides on Twitter.

3. Purple Rain (won’t stop us)

Even if it’s raining, the ride will ride on. Take inspiration from Prince’s amazing rain-soaked superbowl performance. If the rain is really coming down, the route will be shortened from ~9 miles to ~5 miles. The endpoint is covered and inside!

A limited number of souvenir pennants are available for purchase.

A limited number of souvenir pennants are available for purchase.







4. You Remind Me of the Babe

While the end party spot is 21+, families are totally welcome on the ride and the route is designed to be cargo-bike and slow-bike friendly at around ~8-9MPH roll. Just keep any babies away from the Goblin King!

5. Who helps us party like it’s 1999?

A small group of amazing volunteers work their sparkling butts off to make the ride an awesome experience, plus local business sponsors that donate materials and cash to offset some of the costs. Give some love to Clinton Street Theater, Berkshire Ginsberg LLC, Montucky Cold Snack, Go By Bike, and AnomaLily Consulting for helping make the ride possible.

6. The (Wo)Man Who Sold the World

There’s some seriously schwank pennants available to buy to support Bowie Vs Prince expenses. They’re limited edition (only 50) so reserve yours before the ride.

7. Ch-ch-ch-changes

Is this really the last ever Bowie Vs Prince? Only time will tell.

For more great rides all month long check out the calendar at Pedalpalooza.org.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

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Hundreds turn out for Pedalpalooza Kickoff Ride (photos)

Hundreds turn out for Pedalpalooza Kickoff Ride (photos)

Pedalpalooza Kickoff Ride 2016-28.jpg

Portland’s annual Pedalpalooza kicked off in fine fashion tonight. The mass of riders strung out on Belmont from SE 12th (where I’m standing to take this photo) all the way onto the Morrison Bridge over the Willamette River.
(Photos J. Maus/BikePortland)

Tonight’s Pedalpalooza Kickoff Ride was the largest in recent memory with hundreds of people (a thousand?) turning out to celebrate the upcoming month of rides, fun and new friends.

We assembled at the Salmon Street Fountain. The Pedalpalooza spirit was strong with lots of smiles and people milling about promoting their rides, passing out flyers, and showing off their bike fun flair. Once it was time to ride we rolled up onto the Morrison Bridge, headed east on Belmont to 39th, then rode over to Hawthorne to loop back to the Willamette River. There was an after-party on the Esplanade under the Hawthorne Bridge.

At one point on the ride I stood in the middle of Belmont at 12th where there’s a slight incline so I could see as far back as possible (see the photo above). As the wave of riders came up to me I had to put down my camera. I just stood there in awe of the size and energy of the mass. This is about so much more than having fun. This is where and how our community grows and gets stronger. This is the best of Portland!

What a fantastic way to kick things off. Check out all our photos below…

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Plug into more great rides all month at Pedalpalooza.org.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

Our work is supported by subscribers. Please become one today.

The post Hundreds turn out for Pedalpalooza Kickoff Ride (photos) appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Hundreds turn out for Pedalpalooza Kickoff Ride (photos)

Hundreds turn out for Pedalpalooza Kickoff Ride (photos)

Pedalpalooza Kickoff Ride 2016-28.jpg

Portland’s annual Pedalpalooza kicked off in fine fashion tonight. The mass of riders strung out on Belmont from SE 12th (where I’m standing to take this photo) all the way onto the Morrison Bridge over the Willamette River.
(Photos J. Maus/BikePortland)

Tonight’s Pedalpalooza Kickoff Ride was the largest in recent memory with hundreds of people (a thousand?) turning out to celebrate the upcoming month of rides, fun and new friends.

We assembled at the Salmon Street Fountain. The Pedalpalooza spirit was strong with lots of smiles and people milling about promoting their rides, passing out flyers, and showing off their bike fun flair. Once it was time to ride we rolled up onto the Morrison Bridge, headed east on Belmont to 39th, then rode over to Hawthorne to loop back to the Willamette River. There was an after-party on the Esplanade under the Hawthorne Bridge.

At one point on the ride I stood in the middle of Belmont at 12th where there’s a slight incline so I could see as far back as possible (see the photo above). As the wave of riders came up to me I had to put down my camera. I just stood there in awe of the size and energy of the mass. This is about so much more than having fun. This is where and how our community grows and gets stronger. This is the best of Portland!

What a fantastic way to kick things off. Check out all our photos below…

Pedalpalooza Kickoff Ride 2016-5.jpg

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Plug into more great rides all month at Pedalpalooza.org.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

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The post Hundreds turn out for Pedalpalooza Kickoff Ride (photos) appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Pedalpalooza starts tomorrow!

Pedalpalooza starts tomorrow!

Pedalpalooza 2010 Kickoff Parade-30

A scene from the 2010 kickoff ride.
(Photo by J. Maus/BikePortland)

It’s almost here. The largest bike event of its kind on planet Earth is about to start.

That’s right. It’s Pedalpa-frickin-looza time. And it all begins tomorrow at 6:00 pm with the tradional opening event: The Kickoff ride.

Or if you can’t wait, join the Urban Adventure League for the Sunrise Coffee Club ride at 5:00 am at Broughton Beach out on the Columbia River.

If that sounds a bit crazy, welcome to Pedalpalooza. For the 14th year in a row Portlanders of all stripes have come together to organize a bevy of creative bike events — 278 and counting over 26 days — that are free and inclusive and are guaranteed to make you love Portland even more than you already do.







I have a hunch this year’s events will see huge crowds. It’s a hunch based on three main things:

1) We’ve had lots of nice weather to get people in the biking mood.
2) The BTA’s Bike More Challenge just ended (it used to happen in September), so that means many new riders are primed to just keep on pedaling.
3) People are ready to jump into something life-affirming and positive after what has been a bruising election season and incessentaly depressing news cycle.

Look at the Kickoff Ride, it’s already got 493 RSVPs and nearly 800 “interesteds” on Facebook. That’s a big number for a DIY, grassroots bike ride.

To give you a sense of the insanity that is Pedalpalooza, there are 22 rides on June 18th alone:

How do you choose?

How do you choose?

There’s so much good stuff on the schedule this year.

What rides are you looking forward to the most?

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

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It’s time to start getting excited about Pedalpalooza 2016

It’s time to start getting excited about Pedalpalooza 2016

Hammercise Ride-7

Random acts of Hammercise: one more treasure of the Portland summer.
(Photos: J.Maus/BikePortland)

This is a guest post by Chris “Fool” McCraw, a longtime contributor to Pedalpalooza, the self-organizing festival of bike fun that happens in Portland every June.

Pedalpalooza is back for 2016 and better than ever. This year we’re running from the 9th of June until the 4th of July, to embrace even more of that delicious sunny summer weather.

Rocky Butte Sunset Ride-7

Some great rides are big and some great rides are small.

Everything gets started at the kickoff ride, which will be led by the Thursday Night Ride crew. We’re aiming to have Pedalpalooza pennants for the first couple of hundred folks who show up, so come early and make some new friends and catch up with old ones.





Bowie vs Prince Ride-24

Some of the popular rides from years past have already committed: Dropout Prom, the Midnight Mystery Ride, and of course the dueling “biggest events of Pedalpalooza” – the Naked Bike Ride and Sunday Parkways, back to back on June 25 and 26.

What’s going to be most exciting event at Pedalpalooza this year? Your ride! If you already have an idea, throw it on the calendar. If you need help brainstorming, visit the Pedalpalooza page on Facebook and toss your half-baked idea out there. You’ll almost certainly get suggestions and you might find a co-leader!

Having trouble believing that you’re ready to lead a ride? Fear not, there will be two Ride Leadership Rides this year: one on May 8 and one the first weekend of Pedalpalooza in June.

chrisfool

Chris McCraw

Stay tuned to BikePortland for more coverage. Here’s to hoping 2016 is the best Pedalpalooza ever!

– Chris “Fool” McCraw, member of Team Slow and that guy who always has huge bunny ears attached to his helmet.

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How David Bowie, Prince and Todd Haynes accidentally begat a beloved Portland bike tradition

How David Bowie, Prince and Todd Haynes accidentally begat a beloved Portland bike tradition

Bowie vs Prince Ride-29

The eternal conflict.
(Photos: J.Maus/BikePortland)

Each summer, fans of two brilliant, proudly weird performers meet in two different Portland spots and then join up to form a huge, glamorous rolling jam with costumes and thumping dance beats.

Not unlike with the late, great David Bowie himself, the success of the annual Bowie Vs Prince ride took even its creator by surprise. It turned out that, just as the English-speaking world had spent the 1960s secretly getting ready to be blown away by Ziggy Stardust, the Portland of the 2000s had been secretly getting ready to go nuts for this particular bike ride.

In 2008, Lillian Karabaic was a twentysomething college dropout living in an anarchist co-op on Mississippi Avenue, working as an Americorps fellow and a program staffer for the Bicycle Transportation Alliance.

Among her longtime obsessions: bikes, in particular the open-source festival of bike fun called Pedalpalooza; and glam rock, in particular the cult 1998 movie Velvet Goldmine directed by future Portland resident Todd Haynes.

Here’s Karabaic’s account:

I’d seen Velvet Goldmine at least 100 times at that point. Velvet Goldmine and glam rock were very formative in my youth, but my Prince knowledge was pretty low. I had learned choreography to a Prince song as a figure skater, but other than that, not much.

I wish I could really remember what sparked the idea of Bowie Vs Prince, but there wasn’t a conversation or a big idea. It simply sounded like a fun theme for a bike ride. Both artists have such a strong sense of fashion, such a wide-ranging danceable discography, and so many characters to inhabit for a costume ride, I simply thought a mash-up would be fun. 2008 was my first Pedalpalooza living in Portland and I was really excited about putting rides on the calendar – I think I must have hosted four rides, including the first Bowie vs Prince, that year.

I thought maybe 20 people would show up for Bowie vs Prince, and we’d just ride along with the Dropout ride dressed as Bowie and Prince. Turned out, a few hundred people showed up. The park was packed. I really rested on the awesomeness of the Dropout bike ride crew, to this day I still owe a debt to [longtime Dropout Bike Club member] Sysfail for letting us use his amazing sound system – I just had a small boombox on a trailer, not expecting the kind of crowd that showed up. We ended up partying on Mt Tabor until the sun came up, meeting up with the Solstice Ride. It was magical. So we had to keep doing it the next year. Turns out you can’t fight the power of Bowie.

Bowie vs Prince Ride-33

The summer of 2010, I was going to be working in rural India all summer, so I left Bowie Vs Prince off the Pedalpalooza calendar. I was contacted by Diablo, who said “I LOVE Bowie Vs Prince, what day is it going to be on? I want to make sure my ride doesn’t conflict.” I ended up handing off the ride that summer to Diablo, who has been my co-leader ever since. Turns out Diablo had ridden on the first Bowie Vs Prince because he liked Bowie and Prince and ended up started riding his long commute to Vancouver after biking on that ride. So Bowie really does make people start riding bikes. No joke. All the time when I mention I lead this ride, people tell me “OH THAT RIDE? I ride every single year! It’s the only time I pull out my bike!”. In 2012, an Italian bike rider visited Portland based on coming to Bowie Vs Prince. A few months back, a sales clerk at the vintage store told me “I start commuting to work by bike every May to get ready for that ride because I love David Bowie! My husband and I do it on a tandem!”

David Bowie has done so much in his life’s work, but one of the lesser-known things is getting more people in Portland to ride bikes, even if just one day of the year.


Kooky ideas, a culture of creativity, technical know-how, unexpected connections and a venue for fusing them all into something new and awesome — those are the things that great cities are built on, whether it’s postwar London, 1980s Minneapolis or modern Portland.

Bowie vs Prince Ride-9

Commencing countdown: Karabaic as a
Bowie character in 2012.

Karabaic went on to get an economics degree from Reed College and now works as a development manager for the Community Cycling Center (and, among other things, as the volunteer producer and co-host of the BikePortland podcast). A couple more notes:

• Bowie Vs Prince has come up in her job interviews … twice.

• She was considering ending Bowie Vs Prince this year, which will be the 9th ride, because it’s gotten so large to manage & organize. “But I think I’ll have at least one more in me in memory of David Bowie this year,” Karabaic says. “My dream is a wedding between a cosplay David Bowie and a cosplay Prince. Once I’ve done that, I’m done.”

As we reported earlier today, Karabaic will lead Team Bowie in a memorial of the star’s life this evening: meet at 5 p.m., ride at 5:30. After that, just follow the sound of Ziggy Stardust’s voice.

— Michael Andersen, (503) 333-7824 – michael@bikeportland.org


The post How David Bowie, Prince and Todd Haynes accidentally begat a beloved Portland bike tradition appeared first on BikePortland.org.

10 photos to get you excited for tonight’s Pedalpalooza Kickoff Ride

10 photos to get you excited for tonight’s Pedalpalooza Kickoff Ride

Pedalpalooza 2014 Kickoff Parade-45

Yeah! Gimme five!
(Photos J Maus/BikePortland)

Pedalpalooza is here! Today marks the start of Portland’s beloved annual bike festival with hundreds of events lined up over the next three weeks.

Tonight at 6:00 is the official Kickoff Ride, so I figured I’d go through my photo archive and pull out some of my favorites from the past 10 years. I love the Kickoff Ride because everyone is in such a hopeful, optimistic, and and excited mood. There’s a contagious buzz about all the fun stuff the month will bring and the ride has a way of restoring my faith in humanity, in bicycles, and our city all at the same time. 

I hope you enjoy these photos as much as I do…

Pedalpalooza '06 Kickoff Parade

2006
Pedalpalooza Kickoff Parade!-8.jpg

2008
Pedalpalooza Kickoff Parade!-36.jpg

2008
Pedalpalooza Kickoff Ride 2009-32

2009
Pedalpalooza 2010 Kickoff Parade-4

2010

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Pedalpalooza 2010 Kickoff Parade-30

2010
Pedalpalooza 2010 Kickoff Parade-35

2010
Pedalpalooza 2014 Kickoff Parade-31

2014
Pedalpalooza Kickoff Ride-34

2012
Pedalpalooza 2014 Kickoff Parade-37

2014
Pedalpalooza 2014 Kickoff Parade-35

2014
Pedalpalooza 2014 Kickoff Parade-8

This year’s ride starts starts at Salmon Street Fountain. Get out there and help make this the biggest and funnest Pedalpalooza ever!

Check the full Pedalpalooza ride calendar here.


The post 10 photos to get you excited for tonight’s Pedalpalooza Kickoff Ride appeared first on BikePortland.org.

10 photos to get you excited for tonight’s Pedalpalooza Kickoff Ride

10 photos to get you excited for tonight’s Pedalpalooza Kickoff Ride

Pedalpalooza 2014 Kickoff Parade-45

Yeah! Gimme five!
(Photos J Maus/BikePortland)

Pedalpalooza is here! Today marks the start of Portland’s beloved annual bike festival with hundreds of events lined up over the next three weeks.

Tonight at 6:00 is the official Kickoff Ride, so I figured I’d go through my photo archive and pull out some of my favorites from the past 10 years. I love the Kickoff Ride because everyone is in such a hopeful, optimistic, and and excited mood. There’s a contagious buzz about all the fun stuff the month will bring and the ride has a way of restoring my faith in humanity, in bicycles, and our city all at the same time. 

I hope you enjoy these photos as much as I do…

Pedalpalooza '06 Kickoff Parade

2006
Pedalpalooza Kickoff Parade!-8.jpg

2008
Pedalpalooza Kickoff Parade!-36.jpg

2008
Pedalpalooza Kickoff Ride 2009-32

2009
Pedalpalooza 2010 Kickoff Parade-4

2010

We rely on financial support from readers like you.


Pedalpalooza 2010 Kickoff Parade-30

2010
Pedalpalooza 2010 Kickoff Parade-35

2010
Pedalpalooza 2014 Kickoff Parade-31

2014
Pedalpalooza Kickoff Ride-34

2012
Pedalpalooza 2014 Kickoff Parade-37

2014
Pedalpalooza 2014 Kickoff Parade-35

2014
Pedalpalooza 2014 Kickoff Parade-8

This year’s ride starts starts at Salmon Street Fountain. Get out there and help make this the biggest and funnest Pedalpalooza ever!

Check the full Pedalpalooza ride calendar here.


The post 10 photos to get you excited for tonight’s Pedalpalooza Kickoff Ride appeared first on BikePortland.org.