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The BikePortland Podcast: The bike media

The BikePortland Podcast: The bike media

jrascreenerlead

Screenshot from Jonathan’s other blog, circa 2005.

Once upon a time, a bike-industry media consultant named Jonathan Maus observed that “blogs are changing the way people communicate on the web.”

That was 11 years ago, to be precise. And Jonathan’s feeling at the time — blogs are amazing, why doesn’t everyone and everything have one? — has basically come true; these days we just call most of them “Facebook pages.”

The media revolution between 2005 and today has changed a lot of other things, and one of them is biking. In the first episode of the rebooted BikePortland podcast, Jonathan, producer Lillian Karabaic and I talk about the modern bike media.





For some of the show, we’re speaking as insiders of a sort. For other parts, we’re speaking as consumers. And we try to get at the ways that the shifting bike media have led, fed and followed changes in biking culture over those years, too. We also mention a few of our favorite media sources and the stories and reporters who inspire us.

As I mentioned, this will be the first episode of a sort of reboot of our podcast. In this and the coming episodes, we’ll be making an effort to tackle unusual and surprising subjects, or at least look at familiar subjects in old ways. We’re excited to get that rolling. We’ll also be using the podcast feed for one or two other things — in-depth audio interviews with Portland mayoral candidates, for one. As always, we’re eager to hear your thoughts and ideas.

Oh, and one last thing: We’ve introduced a new closing feature for the end of the podcast: we’re going to ask readers and listeners a question and share some of their replies. So here’s next month’s question:

What’s the most dangerous thing you’ve ever carried on a bike?

Talk to you next month.

— Michael Andersen, (503) 333-7824 – michael@bikeportland.org

BikePortland can’t survive without subscribers. It’s just $10 per month and you can sign up in a few minutes.

You can subscribe to our monthly podcast with Stitcher or iTunes, subscribe by RSS, sign up to get an email notification each time we upload a new episode, or just listen to it above using Libsyn. Listen to past episodes here.

The post The BikePortland Podcast: The bike media appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Transportation and tech collide in our latest podcast

Transportation and tech collide in our latest podcast

podcastpanel2

Left to right: Michael Andersen, Mychal Tetteh, Noel Mickelberry, William Henderson and Chris Smith.
(Photo © J. Maus/BikePortland)

The BikePortland Podcast has returned with a vengeance.

It’s been several months since we last shared an episode. To make up for our hiatus, last week (with the help of some friends) we recorded a live episode at the headquarters of Simple in northwest Portland.

“Apple needs to be called out for sucking. They didn’t know the Tilikum Crossing was a thing until a few weeks ago.”
— William Henderson

Our Producer Lily Karabaic put together a solid show about the intersection of technology and transportation. It was moderated by our News Editor Michael Andersen who led a fantastic discussion with four special guests: William Henderson of Knock Software (makers of the Ride Report app); Noel Mickelberry from Oregon Walks; Mychal Tetteh from the Community Cycling Center; and Chris Smith, a technologist, blogger, and citizen activist who also happens to be on the Portland Planning Commission.

The first question they answerwed was: Which technology has done more for people who have a low-car life: Apple, Amazon, or Google?

Smith said Amazon because he uses it instead of going to the store. “But,” he added, “has that been a net VMT [vehicle miles traveled] benefit? That remains to be seen.”

In contrast, Henderson said Google should get the reward because they’ve done the most to make transit data available to the public. “And Apple needs to be called out for sucking,” he added, to a cheers and jeers from the live audience, “they didn’t know the Tilikum Crossing was a thing until a few weeks ago.”


Other topics included how city planners are using (or aren’t using) new forms of user-generated traffic data. With all smartphones essentially being beacons, Chris Smith shared, “We could have wireless pedestrian counters sitting at every corner giving us data about where curbs are needed most.”

And then there’s the tricky issue of the risk of “digital redlining” where the use of new tools leaves entire swaths of the population at the side of the road. Or the increasing use of datasets like Strava, which have a clear bias toward one type of user and activity.

Tetteh with the Community Cycling Center said he’s concerned that some technologies will lead to incorrect decisions about where transportation investments are needed. “For us to not focus our time, attention and resources where people have those challenges and bariers — where’s there huge opportunity for growth in ridership — it’s just not smart. It shouldn’t just tug at your hearstrings it should tug at our pocketbooks.”

When asked about their dream app, Noel Mickelberry from Oregon Walks had our current storm on her mind. “How about an app that will detect when leaves are blocking your storm drain and proactively unclog it,” she said with a smile.

Watch or listen below…

You can subscribe to our monthly podcast with Stitcher or iTunes, subscribe by RSS, sign up to get an email notification each time we upload a new episode, or just listen to it above using Libsyn.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org


The post Transportation and tech collide in our latest podcast appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Join us for a live episode of the BikePortland Podcast on December 17th

Join us for a live episode of the BikePortland Podcast on December 17th

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The BikePortland Podcast is coming back. With a bang.

We know it’s been too long since our last episode (thanks for all your emails asking about it), so we’re excited to announce that we’ve teamed up with Oregon Walks and the Community Cycling Center for a live recording event. It’s a way to get up-close and personal with our podcast while enjoying free food and drinks and help support these two fantastic local non-profits.

The topic of the show is Breaking the Grid: Tech & Transportation in Conversation and it’s happening at 5:30 pm on December 17th at the headquarters of Simple (926 NW 13th Ave, #200). The show is being put together by Lillian Karabaic and our very own news editor Michael Andersen will moderate the discussion. Joining Michael and Lily will be: William Henderson, founder of Knock Software and creator of the Ride Report app that’s giving people powerful new ways to quantify their trips and giving planners new ways to use the data; Mychal Tetteh, CEO of the Community Cycling Center; and Noel Mickelberry, Executive Director of Oregon Walks.

– Advertisement –


This is sure to be a conversation you won’t want to miss; but there’s a catch. Space at the event is limited so if you’d like to attend you’ll need to RSVP. Tickets are available for a $10 donation to both Oregon Walks and the Community Cycling Center via the Willamette Week’s Give Guide.

We’ve also set aside 10 tickets for BikePortland subscribers. If you’re a BikePortlander, just be one of the first 10 to RSVP by filling out the ticket form and you’ll be all set. (If you still haven’t signed up, here’s where you make that happen.)

Please join us on the 17th for an illuminating discussion while enjoying a free buffet, beer, cider, and wine bar courtesy of Hopworks Urban Brewery, Lagunitas Brewery, and Reverand Nat’s.

Learn more and grab the RSVP link at the Facebook event page.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org


The post Join us for a live episode of the BikePortland Podcast on December 17th appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Our May podcast: How biking advocates are made

Our May podcast: How biking advocates are made

2013 BTA Alice Awards-18

Gresham High School health teacher Kristen Warren
accepting an Alice B. Toeclips advocacy award in 2013.
(Photo: J.Maus/BikePortland)

One of the five ingredients for building a great biking city is a steady flow of passionate and talented people motivated to shed sweat and tears to make their cities better.

But where do advocates come from?

That’s the question we explore in the latest episode of the BikePortland podcast, which is back after a several-month sabbatical (our volunteer producer, Lillian Karabaic, was busy riding bikes and catching trains in 10 countries, among other things). We’re joined by a native Portlander who thinks about this subject a lot: the cerebral, disarmingly humble executive director of the Community Cycling Center, Mychal Tetteh.

We rely on financial support from readers like you.


Cycle Oregon 2014 - Day 2-78

Mychal Tetteh.
(Photo by J. Maus/BikePortland)

(Full disclosure: as well as being one of the city’s most prominent biking advocates, Tetteh is also Lily’s boss; her day job is as a development manager for the CCC.)

Tetteh, Lily and I spend the 38-minute show looking into our own pasts, Portland’s history before any of us, and our slightly different notions of Portland’s future to spell out some theories about how people make the transition from bike user to biking advocate, and what Portland (and other cities) can do to encourage and nurture its next cohort of involved citizens.

Thanks to the many folks who’ve asked us over the last few months when this episode would arrive; we expect to be back on our regular monthly schedule now. Next month’s episode (which we’ll be taping next Friday) will tell the story of bike fun through the eyes of one particularly interesting Portlander. Stay tuned.

You can subscribe to our monthly podcast with Stitcher or iTunes, subscribe by RSS, sign up to get an email notification each time we upload a new episode, or just listen to it above using Libsyn.


The post Our May podcast: How biking advocates are made appeared first on BikePortland.org.

BikePortland Podcast: Your questions of the year, answered

BikePortland Podcast: Your questions of the year, answered

Active Transportation Debate at PSU-18

Some bikey questions are up for debate.
(Photo: J.Maus/BikePortland)

What do you do when a person in a car yields to you at an intersection for no reason?

How do you have a productive discussion with someone who isn’t excited about biking?

If you could get one bike-friendly person in Portland into public office, who would it be?

For the second year, we’ve dedicated an episode of our monthly podcast to answering questions that were, like these, submitted by readers and listeners. So producer Lillian Karabaic, Joathan and I put 20 minutes on my kitchen timer and answered as many as we could before the bell. The result is rapid-fire and fun.

After that lightning round, each of us reviewed the predictions we made for 2014 during last year’s question show (some of us did, ahem, much better than others) and each of us makes a new prediction for 2015.

This episode was taped a few days before New Year’s, which explains a couple of the time-sensitive references here.

Next month, we’ll be joined by Community Cycling Center CEO Mychal Tetteh for a three-way conversation about how to bring new people into the bike advocacy world. Stay tuned.

You can subscribe to our monthly podcast with Stitcher or iTunes, subscribe by RSS, sign up to get an email notification each time we upload a new episode, or just listen to it above using Libsyn.

The post BikePortland Podcast: Your questions of the year, answered appeared first on BikePortland.org.

The BikePortland Podcast will again take your questions

The BikePortland Podcast will again take your questions

BikePortland Podcast crew

Team Podcast: Michael Andersen (L), Lillian Karabaic,
and Jonathan Maus.
(Photo: BikePortland)

It’s the end of the year, and that means the next couple weeks here on BikePortland will be rich with retrospectives and analysis from 2014 and predictions for 2015.

One of those will be part of a new tradition: the annual question show on our podcast. This is a fun endeavor where the three of us — Jonathan, me, and producer Lillian Karabaic — take questions from listeners and others and address as many as we can, on air, in 25 minutes. The only restriction: the questions somehow have to be about either the year past or the year to come.

Last year, we tackled subjects like proper use of crosswalks, the latest improvements to the Springwater Trail and the Nobel Prize for Physics.

It was a great time, and we’ve all been looking forward to this next edition. We’ll be taping on Monday, Dec. 29. Leave your questions about the year past or the year to come in the comments below or email podcast@bikeportland.org.

The post The BikePortland Podcast will again take your questions appeared first on BikePortland.org.

The BikePortland Podcast will again take your questions

The BikePortland Podcast will again take your questions

BikePortland Podcast crew

Team Podcast: Michael Andersen (L), Lillian Karabaic,
and Jonathan Maus.
(Photo: BikePortland)

It’s the end of the year, and that means the next couple weeks here on BikePortland will be rich with retrospectives and analysis from 2014 and predictions for 2015.

One of those will be part of a new tradition: the annual question show on our podcast. This is a fun endeavor where the three of us — Jonathan, me, and producer Lillian Karabaic — take questions from listeners and others and address as many as we can, on air, in 25 minutes. The only restriction: the questions somehow have to be about either the year past or the year to come.

Last year, we tackled subjects like proper use of crosswalks, the latest improvements to the Springwater Trail and the Nobel Prize for Physics.

It was a great time, and we’ve all been looking forward to this next edition. We’ll be taping on Monday, Dec. 29. Leave your questions about the year past or the year to come in the comments below or email podcast@bikeportland.org.

The post The BikePortland Podcast will again take your questions appeared first on BikePortland.org.

BikePortland Podcast: What if?

BikePortland Podcast: What if?

Policymakers Ride 2014-49

What would happen if every local bridge were tolled?
And other speculative but interesting scenarios.
(Photo: J.Maus/BikePortland)

We spend all our time on this website writing about things that are true.

So we decided that it’d be fun to spend 40 minutes talking about things that aren’t.

In the latest episode of our monthly podcast, producer Lillian Karabaic, Jonathan and I sat down for a particularly fun game: inspired by this CityLab post, we took turns proposing improbable (but plausible) events that could change the future of Portland transportation and then making educated (though sometimes wacky) guesses about what would happen next.

We considered scenarios like these:

What if Walmart started selling commuter-quality bikes?

What if the city held its public meetings after its street projects instead of beforehand?

What if we removed every street parking space in the city overnight?

We spent a few minutes on each of these and other possibilities. And the ideas did my favorite thing that ideas can do: ricochet.

One annoying note: Due to a problem with my microphone, I’m at a much lower volume here than Jonathan and Lily. Listening with headphones helps. We apologize for this and will get it straightened out for the next episode.

You can subscribe to our monthly podcast with Stitcher or iTunes, subscribe by RSS, sign up to get an email notification each time we upload a new episode, or just listen to it above using Libsyn.

The post BikePortland Podcast: What if? appeared first on BikePortland.org.

BikePortland Podcast: Pedaling the urban/rural divide with Cycle Oregon

BikePortland Podcast: Pedaling the urban/rural divide with Cycle Oregon

Cycle Oregon 2014 - Day 6-19

In our latest episode, we talk about biking’s role in bridging the urban/rural divide.
(Photo by J. Maus/BikePortland)

Can cycling really make a difference to help close the yawning gap that exists between Oregon’s cities and its small, rural towns?

As someone who promotes and advocates for bicycle-related tourism, that’s a question that weighed heavily on my mind during the 7-day, 490-mile Cycle Oregon ride I did last month. BikePortland Podcast producer and co-host Lily Karabaic was also on that ride, so we decided to sit down with Cycle Oregon Executive Director Alison Graves to delve into the topic a bit deeper.

In this month’s episode, Alison, Lily and I talk about divisions that exist between rural and urban Oregon, how Cycle Oregon is working to strengthen “authentic Oregon” and change the image of its ride (and its riders), why cycling should not oversold as a silver-bullet to cure rural Oregon’s economic woes, and more…

But wait, there’s more!

Coming up October 25th…. It’s the Transport-astic Studio Opening Party. Join Michael, Lily, me and the fine folks behind The Sprocket Podcast and the (forthcoming) Transportini Podcast to toast Open Roads Broadcasting. We’ll be giving tours of the Independent Publishing Resource Center (where we record), doing some live radio, having a game or two of Urban Growth Boundary Twister, sharing drinks and snacks, and more. It’s 10/25 at 6:30 pm at the IPRC (1001 SE Division). Check the flyer below…

transport-asticflyer

You can subscribe to our monthly podcast with Stitcher or iTunes, subscribe by RSS, sign up to get an email notification each time we upload a new episode, or just listen to it above using Libsyn.

The post BikePortland Podcast: Pedaling the urban/rural divide with Cycle Oregon appeared first on BikePortland.org.

BikePortland Podcast: The Great Blinking Light Debate (and more)

BikePortland Podcast: The Great Blinking Light Debate (and more)

Bike Light Parade

Just lights to some people, but an
annoyance — and even a health hazard — for others.
(Photo: J. Maus/BikePortland)

Why would someone spray paint an angry, profanity-laced message about “epileptic lights” on a bikeway? Well, as the story we posted earlier this month illustrates, there’s a lot more to the topic of bike lights than you might think.

With that in mind Michael Andersen, Lillian Karabaic (our wonderful producer) and I tackled the topic of lights in the most recent episode of the BikePortland Podcast.

We were joined in studio by Halley Weaver, author of the Bikeleptic blog. Halley is not only an everyday bike rider, she also has photo-sensitive epilepsy, a condition that impacts her riding experience. For instance, she’s been a volunteer for the Portland World Naked Bike Ride for the past six years, but she can’t actually participate in the ride because of all the blinking bike lights used by the thousands of participants.

In this episode, Halley shares the straight dope on how your light choices can have serious health impacts on her and other road users with epilepsy — and how to make bike lighting choices that can minimize those impacts.

We also discuss the science behind nighttime visibility, the lack of lights as standard equipment on bikes sold in the U.S., and much more.

Have a listen for yourself…

And if you’re wondering about the fun song played during the intro, check out the video here.

You can subscribe to our monthly podcast with Stitcher or iTunes, subscribe by RSS, sign up to get an email notification each time we upload a new episode, or just listen to it above using Libsyn. Listen to past episodes here.

The post BikePortland Podcast: The Great Blinking Light Debate (and more) appeared first on BikePortland.org.