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ODOT will add three “enhanced” crossings as part of safety changes coming to 82nd

ODOT will add three “enhanced” crossings as part of safety changes coming to 82nd

odot-map-crossings

Location of three intersections that will get “enhanced pedestrian crossings”.
(Base map is Metro’s Bike There map to show location of nearby bikeways.)

The Oregon Department of Transportation wants you to learn more about their plans to make several changes to SE 82nd Avenue. They’ll hold an open house for their 82nd Avenue Intersection Improvements project next Tuesday, January 26th.

The project will impact nine intersections. At six of them — Burnside, Stark, Washington, Yamhill, Mill and Division — ODOT will upgrade traffic signals, add curb ramps to meet ADA standards, and add more reflective street signs. Of particular note is that five of those intersections rank among the top five percent of high-crash sites in the region. And SE Mill is currently part of a neighborhood greenway route. At three other intersections – Ash, Salmon, and just north of Division — ODOT will build “enhanced pedestrian crossings.”


Here’s more from ODOT about those crossings:

The enhanced pedestrian crossings will each include signage and a pedestrian refuge “island” between the northbound and southbound lanes on SE 82nd Avenue. In addition, crosswalk striping and Rapid Flash Beacons will be installed at the crossing north of SE Division Street, where there are more pedestrians crossing SE 82nd Avenue to get to and from Portland Community College (PCC).

The project will cost $5.4 million dollars and it comes ODOT’s Transportation Safety Programs budget. $400,000 of that total cost is being spent on the three intersections getting enhanced crossing infrastructure. The project is part of ODOT’s long-range focus on making updates to 82nd.

Next week’s open house is set for 5:00 to 7:00 pm in the cafeteria of Harris Park Elementary School (2225 SE 87th Ave). Construction is scheduled to begin in early February and be completed by this fall.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

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Outreach begins for likely upgrades to SE 82nd Avenue

Outreach begins for likely upgrades to SE 82nd Avenue

82ndlead

Plenty of room for changes.
(Photo: Google Streetview)

The street that once ran along part of Portland’s eastern border is now one of its most important corridors, and it’s lined up for some changes — which may even include a new bikeway.

On Saturday, Oct. 10, the 82nd Avenue Improvement Coalition will host a community forum about the urban highway’s future. It’s convened by the Asian-Pacific American Network of Oregon, the force behind an effort to keep strengthening the identity of the Jade District near 82nd and Division; by state Sen. Michael Dembrow, one of the forces behind an effort to bring 82nd Avenue from state to local control; and by the Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability, which is updating its zoning maps in ways that could push the street away from its current highway-on-the-edge-of-town atmosphere.

Amid all that, there’s a potential source of serious cash pointed toward Southeast 82nd between Powell and Division: the Powell-Division Transit and Development project, which is likely to use state and/or federal funding to add a rapid bus line running east on Powell Boulevard out of downtown, north on 82nd, and then east to Gresham on Division Street.

That’s where the possibility of a bikeway comes in. Under state law, “footpaths and bicycle trails, including curb cuts or ramps as part of the project, shall be provided wherever a highway, road or street is being constructed, reconstructed or relocated.” (Whether the project triggers the “Bike Bill” could become a sticking point down the road.)

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The possibilities for the Powell-Division project aren’t yet clear, but I’ve been told that it’s currently seen as unlikely that buses could get an entire dedicated lane. Queue-jump lanes at traffic signals, nicer stations and other features would certainly make for easier politics.

The Powell-Division project, which is currently led by Metro, is already doing more than maybe any previous transit plan in the area to consider biking not just as a complication to be dealt with but as an important aspect of the system being created.

In May, Metro circulated a 25-page overview of the bicycle elements of the plan. That plan discussed likely bike lanes for outer Division but skirted the topic of what to do about the bike lanes that would seem to be required on that stretch of 82nd if the street gets the sort of meaningful investment that would be needed to create an attractive bus rapid transit line.

Here’s a description of the Oct. 10 event from the 82nd Avenue Improvement coalition:

The event will include opportunities to meet city planners and give public testimony on the City of Portland’s Mixed-Use Zoning and Employment Zones projects, as well as public outreach and discussion relating to other issues and projects affecting the area, including transportation and transit, housing, and small business. Mayor Charlie Hales will also attend and speak to the attendees.

The 82nd Avenue Community Forum takes place October 10, 2015 from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm at the Jade/APANO Multicultural Space at 8114 SE Division Street in Portland. Doors open at 9:30 am.

Now’s the time to get this project on your radar. Please get involved and share your feedback if possible.


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NPGreenway hires new coordinator to speed up completion of path project

NPGreenway hires new coordinator to speed up completion of path project

shamus

Shamus Lynsky at a Sunday Parkways
event in 2009.
(Photo © J. Maus/BikePortland)

Not satisfied with an official estimated project completion date of 2032, npGreenway, the group pushing for the North Portland Greenway path, has hired their first paid staffer.

Instead of 2032, npGreenway wants to have the path completed or have funding in the bank by 2020.

The person hired to step up the urgency around this project is Shamus Lynsky. A resident of St. Johns, Lynsky is the former political director of the Oregon Trial Lawyer Association and also served as executive director of the Oregon Consumers League. Far from a newcomer to the politics of bike advocacy, Lynsky served seven years as a member of the Portland Bicycle Advisory Committee and he co-authored the ODOT grant that brought new bike lanes and other safety improvements to N Rosa Parks Way back in 2011.

With a new project coordinator at the helm, npGreenway says they will now focus on “building a citizen’s movement for a dedicated trail to connect North Portland neighborhoods.” The scrappy non-profit has spent the last 10 years laying the advocacy groundwork for a path along the Willamette that will connect Kelly Point Park to the Eastbank Esplanade. But, like many bold and ambitious bike-oriented plans in Portland, the project has languished, adrift in a sea of stagnation.

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“We’re at that fork in the road… npGreenway needs to grow in order to build that juggernaut that tells the City, Metro, the State, and business owners along the route that we’re willing to work with them but we are going to move it forward.”
— Joe Adamski, npGreenway

To build urgency for the project, npGreenway plans to get much more engaged with the community and policymakers. Board Member Joe Adamski said in an interview this morning “We want to push the City, the State and Metro into doing it sooner because the need is so great,” he said. “We need to get the community power behind it to force the trail completion in a faster timeline … It’s critical to get this going.”

The 2020 completion date for a 10-mile path that remains largely unbuilt might seem ambitious, but much of the legwork and planning for this project is already done. And earlier this year, the Bureau of Transportation’s Bicycle Advisory Committee listed the path as one of their top ten highest priorities. Unfortunately for the Greenway’s fans, PBOT isn’t managing this project. Because it’s considered a “trail” project (I don’t like to use that word because it minimizes a project’s importance as a vital transportation link), the North Portland Greenway is being managed by Portland Parks & Recreation. “So there is that [Parks Bureau] mindset,” Adamski added.

npgreenvision

Vision for the entire route.
(PDF)

Adamski, also a St. Johns resident and bike advocacy veteran, said the hiring of Lynsky will increase npGreenway’s capacity to do more engagement with the community and policymakers. From here on out, we can expect the group to become much more visible. They’ll share a booth with the Bicycle Transportation Alliance at the upcoming Sunday Parkways in north Portland and they’ll lead a Pedalpalooza ride on the future alignment of the path on June 27th.

For Adamski, the addition of Lynsky marks a key turning point for npGreenway and the project itself. “We’re at that fork in the road. Boards either have to get bigger and stronger and more in-tuned with their mission — or they can wither away into obscurity. npGreenway needs to grow in order to build that juggernaut that tells the City, Metro, the State, and business owners along the route that we’re willing to work with them but we are going to move it forward.”

— Get involved and learn more about the North Portland Greenway at npGreenway.org and by browsing our 10 years of past coverage on the project.


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New plan to control cut-through traffic on NE Rodney uses one-way street for one block

New plan to control cut-through traffic on NE Rodney uses one-way street for one block

rodney ivy detail

The city’s new proposal for Rodney at Ivy.
(See below for full plan)

After some neighbors objected to (and some people completely ignored) an experimental traffic diverter running diagonally across the corner of NE Rodney and Ivy, the city is trying a different approach.

Instead, the two-way block of Rodney between Ivy and Fremont would be converted to a one-way street for cars, with a pair of planters and a car parking space blocking northbound auto traffic at the south end of the block.

Bike and foot traffic would be unaffected on the street, thanks to a contraflow bike lane to the right of the parking spaces.

The diagonal diverter in place today would be removed when the change is made later this summer.

rodney plan

These changes are part of a plan to build a new neighborhood greenway on Rodney as a lower-stress alternative to biking the Williams-Vancouver couplet just to the west.

Allan Rudwick, the transportation and land use chair for the Eliot Neighborhood Association, said he thinks the city’s new proposal is likely to address the main problem with cut-through traffic on Rodney: people using it during the evening rush hour to drive north to Fremont, avoiding traffic on Williams and cutting the line on Fremont.

“Fremont between MLK and Williams is jammed up the whole way,” Rudwick explained in an interview Tuesday. “It’s more a problem about Fremont being full of cars.”

The new plan shouldn’t affect emergency vehicles, he said, because they’re allowed to drive against traffic on one-way streets.

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“I think the new proposal solves a number of problems with the old one,” he said. “This design has not been done in neighborhoods before, so it’s going to be different. but I’m optimistic that it will make more people happy.”

City project manager Rich Newlands said in an email that the most similar design in the city is on Northwest Marshall Street between 10th and 11th avenues. There, the contraflow bike lane doesn’t have to cross any driveways, because it runs adjacent to a city park, but the setup is otherwise similar.

changes on NW Marshall

NW Marshall and 10th.

Rudwick’s organization tentatively approved the new plan for Rodney in a letter to the city last week, “unless significant opposition materializes.”

Rudwick said he hasn’t yet heard from everyone who lives on the block between Ivy and Fremont, but he’s hopeful that they won’t find it a major annoyance.

“People live on one-way streets,” he said. “You can also park like a block away, at the end of the block, and not deal with it.”

If the new plan doesn’t successfully ensure that Rodney retains its feel as a neighborhood street, Rudwick said he expects more actions.

“The whole goal of this is to keep traffic on Rodney less than 1000 cars a day, and if that goal is not met by this new proposal, then the city should be on the hook to do something else in addition to this partial diversion,” Rudwick said. “The whole goal of this project is essentially to keep Rodney the way it’s always been.”


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PBOT hopes new signs, markings fix tricky Williams Ave intersection

PBOT hopes new signs, markings fix tricky Williams Ave intersection

Williams Ave & Stanton - observations-4

The person in the truck was legally required to turn left at this intersection; but a weak design — coupled with a bad decision by the vehicle’s operator — led to an abrupt merge in tight quarters with other road users.
(Photos by J. Maus/BikePortland)

Now that construction of the North Williams Safety Project has nearly wrapped up, it’s time to address how specific parts the new design are working — and how they’re not.

There are several issues I plan to look into in the coming weeks. The first is a driving behavior and design concern we’ve observed between N. Knott and Stanton. These are the two blocks where Williams is split due to a median diverter island installed many years ago to decrease the amount of Legacy Emanuel Hospital visitors from driving through the neighborhood.

Even before the big redesign of Williams that took the right-side bike lane and put it on the left side, this location was always a tricky pinch-point. The new design has done nothing to make it better. While the pinching effect of the median is not as bad (and bicycle riders no longer have to deal with a bus stop), the northern part of this section — at Stanton on the south side of Dawson Park — has gotten much worse.

The good news is that we’ve just heard from the Bureau of Transportation that they’re aware of the issue and some fixes are on the way.

The issue here is that the left standard lane is supposed to be for left turns only (like other sections in the new design where there are two standard lanes). PBOT’s intention was that people would only use the left lane if they wanted to turn left onto Graham or on Stanton. Unfortunately, the design is not strong enough and it fails to communicate proper use.

Williams Ave & Stanton - observations-6

This is all you see approaching the split. It’s not clear the left option is left-turn only.

What happens in reality is that many people use the left lane to swoop by other people when there’s a back-up, or they simply use it because it’s there. Then, as they get to Stanton, instead of turning left (west), they try to merge back into the right lane. This behavior is not only illegal, it’s also dangerous.

At Stanton, the bike lane goes from being curbside to being to the right of a curbside parking lane. This transition puts the bike lane directly in the path of people who suddenly realize they want to continue straight. The illegal merging at Stanton from the left lane to the right lane puts drivers directly in conflict with bicycle riders in the bike lane.

Also adding to the stress at this intersection are many people who illegally nose their vehicles out from Stanton in an effort to find their place in Williams traffic. That behavior forces other road users to leave the bicycle lane — putting them in even more direct conflict with people using the left standard lane (as seen in the image below).

Williams Ave & Stanton - observations-5

Williams Ave & Stanton - observations-1

Williams Ave & Stanton - observations-3

View of Williams looking south from Stanton.
Williams Ave & Stanton - observations-2

Another view of Williams looking south from Stanton.

After seeing this problem several times myself and hearing about others with similar concerns, I reached out to Williams project manager Rich Newlands.

Newlands said he was “definitely” aware of the issue. “We realized some time ago that what is in place does not communicate the approaching forced left at Stanton strongly enough, and hence through traffic ends up abruptly cutting back to the right.”

That was nice to hear. But even better, is that PBOT is already on the case. Newlands said there’s a contract change order pending that will do a few things aimed at more strongly communicating the left-turn-only mandate at Stanton.

Here’s what PBOT is doing to fix the problem:

  • Two more left turn arrow pavement markings will be added in advance of the existing one (which is right at Stanton).
  • Two more signs that will say “THRU TRAFFIC MERGE RIGHT”.
  • They’ll extend the existing 8-inch lane striping for the left turn pocket.

These changes should be installed any day now. If they don’t work and the illegal driving behaviors continue, Newlands said PBOT, “has discussed going to a more physical barrier to eliminate the ability to cut back to the right at Stanton.”

If you ride this stretch of Williams, please keep us posted on whether or not these changes help. Your feedback can help PBOT do what’s necessary to make sure bicycling conditions are as low-stress as possible.

— We are also collecting feedback on the Williams changes in general for future reporting. Please send in your comments via email, @BikePortland on Twitter, or however else you prefer to communicate.

The post PBOT hopes new signs, markings fix tricky Williams Ave intersection appeared first on BikePortland.org.

PBOT hopes new signs, markings fix tricky Williams Ave intersection

PBOT hopes new signs, markings fix tricky Williams Ave intersection

Williams Ave & Stanton - observations-4

The person in the truck was legally required to turn left at this intersection; but a weak design — coupled with a bad decision by the vehicle’s operator — led to an abrupt merge in tight quarters with other road users.
(Photos by J. Maus/BikePortland)

Now that construction of the North Williams Safety Project has nearly wrapped up, it’s time to address how specific parts the new design are working — and how they’re not.

There are several issues I plan to look into in the coming weeks. The first is a driving behavior and design concern we’ve observed between N. Knott and Stanton. These are the two blocks where Williams is split due to a median diverter island installed many years ago to decrease the amount of Legacy Emanuel Hospital visitors from driving through the neighborhood.

Even before the big redesign of Williams that took the right-side bike lane and put it on the left side, this location was always a tricky pinch-point. The new design has done nothing to make it better. While the pinching effect of the median is not as bad (and bicycle riders no longer have to deal with a bus stop), the northern part of this section — at Stanton on the south side of Dawson Park — has gotten much worse.

The good news is that we’ve just heard from the Bureau of Transportation that they’re aware of the issue and some fixes are on the way.

The issue here is that the left standard lane is supposed to be for left turns only (like other sections in the new design where there are two standard lanes). PBOT’s intention was that people would only use the left lane if they wanted to turn left onto Graham or on Stanton. Unfortunately, the design is not strong enough and it fails to communicate proper use.

Williams Ave & Stanton - observations-6

This is all you see approaching the split. It’s not clear the left option is left-turn only.

What happens in reality is that many people use the left lane to swoop by other people when there’s a back-up, or they simply use it because it’s there. Then, as they get to Stanton, instead of turning left (west), they try to merge back into the right lane. This behavior is not only illegal, it’s also dangerous.

At Stanton, the bike lane goes from being curbside to being to the right of a curbside parking lane. This transition puts the bike lane directly in the path of people who suddenly realize they want to continue straight. The illegal merging at Stanton from the left lane to the right lane puts drivers directly in conflict with bicycle riders in the bike lane.

Also adding to the stress at this intersection are many people who illegally nose their vehicles out from Stanton in an effort to find their place in Williams traffic. That behavior forces other road users to leave the bicycle lane — putting them in even more direct conflict with people using the left standard lane (as seen in the image below).

Williams Ave & Stanton - observations-5

Williams Ave & Stanton - observations-1

Williams Ave & Stanton - observations-3

View of Williams looking south from Stanton.
Williams Ave & Stanton - observations-2

Another view of Williams looking south from Stanton.

After seeing this problem several times myself and hearing about others with similar concerns, I reached out to Williams project manager Rich Newlands.

Newlands said he was “definitely” aware of the issue. “We realized some time ago that what is in place does not communicate the approaching forced left at Stanton strongly enough, and hence through traffic ends up abruptly cutting back to the right.”

That was nice to hear. But even better, is that PBOT is already on the case. Newlands said there’s a contract change order pending that will do a few things aimed at more strongly communicating the left-turn-only mandate at Stanton.

Here’s what PBOT is doing to fix the problem:

  • Two more left turn arrow pavement markings will be added in advance of the existing one (which is right at Stanton).
  • Two more signs that will say “THRU TRAFFIC MERGE RIGHT”.
  • They’ll extend the existing 8-inch lane striping for the left turn pocket.

These changes should be installed any day now. If they don’t work and the illegal driving behaviors continue, Newlands said PBOT, “has discussed going to a more physical barrier to eliminate the ability to cut back to the right at Stanton.”

Interestingly, what’s out on the street now does not mimic the plans in the project’s final report (published in August 2012). On page 16 of that report the left turn lane doesn’t start until north of Knott, which seems like it would make people less likely to think it’s a through lane. The design in the report also includes “left turn ONLY” pavement markings way before the median island and “shark’s teeth” yield markings which are not present in the final implementation.

williams-plans

From Page 16 of PBOT’s Final Report: North Williams Traffic Safety Operations Project (August 2012).

I’ve asked PBOT for an explanation and will update this post when I hear back.

If you ride this stretch of Williams, please keep us posted on whether or not these changes help. Your feedback can help PBOT do what’s necessary to make sure bicycling conditions are as low-stress as possible.

— We are also collecting feedback on the Williams changes in general for future reporting. Please send in your comments via email, @BikePortland on Twitter, or however else you prefer to communicate.

The post PBOT hopes new signs, markings fix tricky Williams Ave intersection appeared first on BikePortland.org.

New path will link Sellwood to Milwaukie on SE 17th

New path will link Sellwood to Milwaukie on SE 17th

se17thpath-crosssection

SE 17th is getting a makeover between Sellwood and Milwaukie.

A new, $3.4 million path and street design update will vastly improve the bicycling connection between Portland and Milwaukie and the City of Milwaukie wants your feedback on its preliminary design.

The SE 17th Avenue Multi-Use Path project was awarded nearly $3 million in federal “flexible funds” in 2011. The project will create bike lanes and a physically-separated path on a one mile section of SE 17th Avenue between Ochoco and McLoughlin Blvd. The path will connect not only our two cities, but it will also provide a safer bikeway between two major regional paths: the Springwater Corridor and the Trolley Trail.

The Oregon Department of Transportation (who holds the pursestrings on this particular pouch of funds) initially proposed a completion date of 2017, but elected leaders in Milwaukie who are eager to close this gap successfully lobbied ODOT for an “expedited” planning and permitting process that will see it get done by fall of 2015.

SE 17th in this location is currently very uncomfortable for cycling (and walking). Or, as the City of Milwaukie described in their grant application: “The mix of deteriorating infrastructure and changing conditions results in a hazardous and confusing environment, particularly for bicyclists and pedestrians.” The shoulder in the southbound direction is often filled with debris and is relatively narrow. There’s a standard bike lane in the northbound direction, but people drive fast on 17th — thanks in part to its 60-foot width — and it’s not very pleasant to ride on.

17th-99ejunction

Looking south at the 99E Junction.
17th-southofmilportrd

Looking south, just south of Milport Rd.

The project would redesign the street to include two 11-foot wide standard lanes, two five-foot wide bike lanes, and an 11-12 foot physically separated (with a planted stormwater swale) path for biking and walking along the western edge of the existing right-of-way (see lead graphic).

The City of Milwaukie has completed a preliminary design for the path and they’re hosting an open house on Monday, October 27th. There’s also a “Ride Along” event planned for October 30th.

The post New path will link Sellwood to Milwaukie on SE 17th appeared first on BikePortland.org.

New bike lane on SW Salmon improves bike access to Naito Parkway

New bike lane on SW Salmon improves bike access to Naito Parkway

New lane striping SW Salmon at Naito-3

New striping gives bike riders their own lane.
(Photo by J. Maus/BikePortland)

Getting to Naito Parkway and Waterfront Park from downtown Portland just got easier thanks to relatively small — yet significant — changes to two blocks of SW Salmon Street.

New lane striping SW Salmon at Naito-2

Looking west on Salmon as you approach Naito Parkway.
(Photo by J. Maus/BikePortland)

With a major project at the World Trade Center that included a repaving of Salmon between SW 1st and Naito, the Bureau of Transportation jumped on the opportunity to re-stripe the road in a way that improves bicycling access. Instead of three standard lanes between 2nd and Naito, PBOT has striped the road for two standard lanes between 2nd and 1st, and added a bike-only lane between 1st and Naito. They’ve also added sharrows in the right-turn only lane on both blocks and some green caution paint to mark the beginning of the bike lane.

Here’s a rough diagram from PBOT that shows the configuration before and after:

salmon-beforeafter

And an aerial photo taken from a reader who works in an adjacent building:

salmon-aerial

It might not look like that big of a deal, but from a bicycling perspective this is a very welcome change. Salmon just west of Naito was always a bit stressful. The shared, center lane that used to be there (and that allowed users to turn either left or right at Naito) — confused me more than once in the past as I tried to transition onto the Naito bike lane. With the new design, I have my own bicycling space and I know exactly what drivers will do in the lanes to either side of me.

According to PBOT data, there were 26 collisions/crashes at Naito and 1st, 15 of which were attributed to the dual center turn lane. Here’s more from PBOT about the goals and benefits of this project (taken from a project scoping document):

salmon-goals

And it seems others are pleased with the new configuration as well. Here’s a sampling of what we’ve heard on Twitter:

What’s also good news about this is that it cost PBOT just $2,000 (the World Trade Center paid for the paving), which goes to show just how inexpensively we can retrofit existing streets with higher-quality bike access.

PBOT has been on a roll lately with taking advantage of paving projects to update lane markings and configurations. Other projects where we’ve seen bicycle access improvements along with repaving projects include the new buffered bike lanes on NW Everett and the wider bike lanes (and other changes) on N Willamette Blvd.

The post New bike lane on SW Salmon improves bike access to Naito Parkway appeared first on BikePortland.org.

New bike lane on SW Salmon improves bike access to Naito Parkway

New bike lane on SW Salmon improves bike access to Naito Parkway

New lane striping SW Salmon at Naito-3

New striping gives bike riders their own lane.
(Photo by J. Maus/BikePortland)

Getting to Naito Parkway and Waterfront Park from downtown Portland just got easier thanks to relatively small — yet significant — changes to two blocks of SW Salmon Street.

New lane striping SW Salmon at Naito-2

Looking west on Salmon as you approach Naito Parkway.
(Photo by J. Maus/BikePortland)

With a major project at the World Trade Center that included a repaving of Salmon between SW 1st and Naito, the Bureau of Transportation jumped on the opportunity to re-stripe the road in a way that improves bicycling access. Instead of three standard lanes between 2nd and Naito, PBOT has striped the road for two standard lanes between 2nd and 1st, and added a bike-only lane between 1st and Naito. They’ve also added sharrows in the right-turn only lane on both blocks and some green caution paint to mark the beginning of the bike lane.

Here’s a rough diagram from PBOT that shows the configuration before and after:

salmon-beforeafter

And an aerial photo taken from a reader who works in an adjacent building:

salmon-aerial

It might not look like that big of a deal, but from a bicycling perspective this is a very welcome change. Salmon just west of Naito was always a bit stressful. The shared, center lane that used to be there (and that allowed users to turn either left or right at Naito) — confused me more than once in the past as I tried to transition onto the Naito bike lane. With the new design, I have my own bicycling space and I know exactly what drivers will do in the lanes to either side of me.

According to PBOT data, there were 26 collisions/crashes at Naito and 1st, 15 of which were attributed to the dual center turn lane. Here’s more from PBOT about the goals and benefits of this project (taken from a project scoping document):

salmon-goals

And it seems others are pleased with the new configuration as well. Here’s a sampling of what we’ve heard on Twitter:

What’s also good news about this is that it cost PBOT just $2,000 (the World Trade Center paid for the paving), which goes to show just how inexpensively we can retrofit existing streets with higher-quality bike access.

PBOT has been on a roll lately with taking advantage of paving projects to update lane markings and configurations. Other projects where we’ve seen bicycle access improvements along with repaving projects include the new buffered bike lanes on NW Everett and the wider bike lanes (and other changes) on N Willamette Blvd.

The post New bike lane on SW Salmon improves bike access to Naito Parkway appeared first on BikePortland.org.

PBOT set to ‘reorganize’ NW Everett, add buffered bike lane

PBOT set to ‘reorganize’ NW Everett, add buffered bike lane

PBOT’s latest plans for a new buffered bike lane
on NW Everett.
(Image from a slide in PBOT presentation)

The Portland Bureau of Transportation plans to move forward with what their NW Everett Street Reorganization Project. The project, which we first highlighted back in January, aims to improve traffic conditions on Everett from NW 23rd to NW 15th. Impetus for the changes come from a planned re-paving project and a desire by PBOT to address safety concerns at the intersection of NW 16th and Everett.

The right-turn conflicts where Everett meets the I-405 freeway on-ramp at 16th have been a thorn in PBOT’s side for years. Collision statistics show a high rate of right-hooks and PBOT project manager Andrew Sullivan referred to the intersection as chaotic during a meeting of the City’s Bicycle Advisory Committee in January. At that meeting, the committee supported a solution that would move the bike lane from the right to the left side of the street. In the following months, PBOT has refined their plans and they presented them to the Northwest District Association (NWDA) at a meeting on May 7th.

According to PBOT’s presentation shared at that meeting, the current plan is to reconfigure the lanes on NW Everett between 23rd and 19th (an area that has just been repaved, which makes new lane striping much cheaper). In that section, they’ll turn one of the two existing standard lanes into a 10-foot wide bicycle-only lane (seven-foot riding lane with a three-foot buffer) adjacent to an on-street auto parking lane…

From 19th to 15th, PBOT will put keep the two standard lanes and put the existing right-side bike lane on the left side of the street. The new bike lane will be seven-feet wide (it won’t have a buffer) and it will be adjacent to an on-street auto parking lane. (PBOT will remove the existing bike box at 16th.)

Between 16th and 15th (over I-405), PBOT has designed a mixed zone where people on bikes and cars will share the left-turn lane onto 15th. To facilitate the transition from bike-only lane to shared-lane, PBOT will install green markings followed by sharrows…

An alternate view via the official PBOT plan drawing…

An added bonus of having bicycle traffic on the left side of the street is that it makes for an easier connection to NW Flanders, a street PBOT still hopes to make into a bicycle boulevard (despite the failed attempt to install a bicycling/walking-only bridge on Flanders over I-405 back in May 2008).

East of 15th, there is no more dedicated cycling space on Everett. This is by design, as another aspect of this proposal for Everett is to do a similar treatment on Glisan, and making both streets funnel into Flanders. Check out the “Everett/Glisan + Flanders Concept” PBOT shared with the neighborhood…

Jonathan Winslow is co-chair of the NWDA’s Transportation Committee. He said they supported the new design. “I wanted to see a cycle track arrangement,” he shared with us via email after the meeting, “but there was pushback over loss of parking and more legitimately over poor visibility of bikes at many driveway crossings.”

PBOT expects these changes to Everett to have several key impacts: better bicycling connectivity from NW 23rd over I-405; safer crossings of Everett; a reduction in speeds and collisions; and longer wait times coupled with slightly increased auto congestion at signalized intersections. The new configuration also comes with the loss of up to four auto parking spaces on Everett west of 18th.

Work on the project is set to start any day now. Questions and feedback about these changes can be directed to PBOT Project Manager Andrew Sullivan at (503) 823-5234 or andrew.sullivan@portlandoregon.gov.

— For more background, read our story about the safety concerns that prompted this project.