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Don’t miss Sunday Parkways Southeast this weekend!

Don’t miss Sunday Parkways Southeast this weekend!

Sunday Parkways Southeast-5

There will be plenty of ways to keep cool at Sunday Parkways.
(Photo: J. Maus/BikePortland)

We know it’s stiflingly hot right now but the forecast is for cooler temps on Sunday. It should be a perfect day to enjoy your streets the way they intended to be used — by walking, rolling, and riding on them during Sunday Parkways.

The City has prepared a seven-mile loop of carfree streets for your enjoyment and they’ve stuffed them full of activities, food, entertainment, and activities at four parks along the way. If you have friends in town who need bikes, grab a Biketown bike. Over half of the Parkways route is within the service area and you don’t have to worry about the other half because the city is waiving all out-of-area fees for the duration of the event (11:00 am to 4:00 pm).

Route map.

Route map.







Combined with the Connect the Park Blocks event on Saturday followed by the Jade Night Market, this is truly the open streets weekend of the year! Get out there and enjoy it.

PortlandSundayParkways.org

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

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The post Don’t miss Sunday Parkways Southeast this weekend! appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Discount ends tomorrow for the International Open Streets Summit in Portland

Discount ends tomorrow for the International Open Streets Summit in Portland

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Northeast Portland Sunday Parkways, 2014.
(Photo: J.Maus/BikePortland)

The biggest conference about open-streets events (like Sunday Parkways) and tactical urbanism (like Better Block) is coming to Portland next month.

The International Open Streets Summit will bring many people who work to humanize street space to Portland State University from Thursday, Aug. 18 to Saturday, Aug. 20. The draft program includes speakers from Philadelphia; Dallas; Los Angeles; Missoula; Toronto; Cape Town, South Africa; and Santiago, Chile, among others.

The “tactical urbanism” thread is newly added to this conference, reflecting the fact that fast, flexible changes and demos on city streets are a growing trend among community groups and city governments alike. Mike Lydon, a planning consultant helping produce this conference, literally wrote the book on that subject.








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We reported last fall that Portland won its bid to host this year’s conference.

This is the event’s third year. The first was in Los Angeles in 2014 and last year’s was in Atlanta. (It drew about 125 people.) Portland’s Sunday Parkways program and Better Block PDX have both been national innovators in these areas, so it’s great for our city to show off the wealth of local expertise.

Early-bird registration is available until tomorrow; it’s $295 and includes off-site tours. Starting Saturday, the price goes up to $350 without tours or $375 with them. There’s also a service fee of $11 to $14. The fee includes lunch on Thursday through Saturday.

— Michael Andersen, (503) 333-7824 – michael@bikeportland.org

Our work is supported by subscribers. Please become one today.

The post Discount ends tomorrow for the International Open Streets Summit in Portland appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Portland police will exchange a U-lock for your cable lock on Sunday

Portland police will exchange a U-lock for your cable lock on Sunday

hales lock

Mayor Charlie Hales on his way to work last fall.
(Photo: M.Andersen/BikePortland)

As bike theft has become the only major category of crime in Portland that’s on a long-term rise, cable locks have been going the way of the station wagon and the wristwatch.

The Portland State University Bike Hub doesn’t even sell them. When Mayor Charlie Hales briefly started biking to work last fall, Willamette Week wrote an entire online article about the fact that he used a cable lock. (His wife Nancy, a regular bike commuter, told us at the time that it was because they’d misplaced their U-lock keys that day.)

Apparently the Bike Theft Task Force at the Portland Police Bureau agrees. In a tweet on Wednesday, the team said they’ll be offering a lock exchange program at North Portland Sunday Parkways this weekend: you give them a cable lock, they give you a U-lock.







If you own a cable lock but not a U-lock, that’s a good deal.

(Thanks to Steve at the Portland Mercury for calling this to our attention.)

Update 2:30 p.m.: Portland Police Bureau Ofc. David Sanders, a member of the Bike Theft Task Force, writes to add some more details:

The BTTF was able to implement this cable lock upgrade program because of a partnership between Project 529 and Abus, and their dedication to reducing bike theft in Portland. They made it happen. Another example of the collaboration that is needed to fight this epidemic. We are also going to offer free bike registration through Project 529 at Sunday’s event, but the main emphasis of this event is proper locking techniques/bike security. We want the public to use U-locks so badly that we are literally giving them away. Hope that shows the public how serious we are about this. We hope that Sunday’s event will prevent many future thefts in Portland!

Project 529 worked with ABUS to work out the details on this program, we (PPB and PBOT funded this) were able to purchase the U-locks at significant discount through a local bike shop. We purchased about 300 locks and will offer a portion of these at Sunday’s event as well as other events around town, so this won’t be the only opportunity (unless we run out…).

— Michael Andersen, (503) 333-7824 – michael@bikeportland.org

Our work is supported by subscribers. Please become one today.

The post Portland police will exchange a U-lock for your cable lock on Sunday appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Sunday Parkways kicks off this weekend in outer southeast Portland

Sunday Parkways kicks off this weekend in outer southeast Portland

East Portland Sunday Parkways-16

East Portland could look like this every day; but for now Sunday Parkways is your one chance to experience its true potential.
(Photo: J. Maus/BikePortland)

Grab your friends and kids and neighbors — it’s time for Sunday Parkways! The ninth annual season starts this Sunday (May 15th) in outer southeast Portland.





From 11:00 am to 4:00 pm you can enjoy a seven-mile loop that’s nearly carfree and full of activities, music, food, and fun! As an added bonus this year Sunday Parkways has connected with Portland Parks & Recreation’s New Portlanders Cultural Celebration & Family Day. This event will help welcome immigrants and refugees to Portland with “culturally specific” recreational activities. Up to 500 families are expected to take part.

Let’s show these new Portlanders how we roll!

Also sure to add an element of excitement to Sunday’s event is the looming election. The top candidates for Portland Mayor — Jules Bailey, Sarah Iannarone, David Schor and Ted Wheeler — have told us they’ll be at the event. Iannarone is leading a ride that meets at 12:00 pm on the corner of 88th and Steele. With a recent poll showing nearly 40 percent of Portlanders still undecided less than one week before ballots are due, Sunday Parkways could be a key campaign event.

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If you live in the area you’ll get to experience the streets in a whole new way. If you don’t ride in outer southeast very much, this is a great opportunity to learn more about the area. The route will highlight beautiful natural areas and parks.

Of particular note will be a functioning BIKETOWN bike share station that will be located at Lents Park. We’re just about two months before the system launches and you can be the first of your friends to do a preview ride!

For more info check out PortlandSundayParkways.org.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

Our work is supported by subscribers. Please become one today.

The post Sunday Parkways kicks off this weekend in outer southeast Portland appeared first on BikePortland.org.

City’s newest Sunday Parkways route heads to Milwaukie via Sellwood Bridge

City’s newest Sunday Parkways route heads to Milwaukie via Sellwood Bridge

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Hello Milwaukie!

With lots of grey skies and another big rainstorm on the way, here’s an event to look forward to this summer: eight miles of (relatively) carfree streets from Southeast Portland to Milwaukie via the new Sellwood Bridge.

That’s one of the five routes the City of Portland has just announced for their 2016 Sunday Parkways season. Now in its ninth year, Sunday Parkways has earned a rightful place among Portland’s many cherished annual outdoor events. Last year’s attendance set a record with an estimated 119,000 people taking part.

This year’s slate of events features four of five routes that are nearly identical to last year. Besides the new Milwaukie route, the Northeast Portland route no longer uses the Cully Blvd cycle track and has different routing through Woodlawn. The season kicks off with the East Portland edition on May 15th, then North Portland on June 26th, the Northeast Portland event on July 24th, Southeast Portland on August 21st, and then the Milwaukie route on October 2nd.

You don’t have to wait until October to ride the new Sellwood Bridge. Multnomah County is set to open it to traffic on March 1st (don’t miss the big celebrations of the old and new bridges on February 25th and 27th respectively).





The Milwaukie route will also include crossings of bridges on the Springwater Corridor over McLoughlin (99E) and will feature activity areas at Westmoreland Park and Sellwood Park. For some Milwaukie residents, the event will be the perfect opportunity to raise awareness for the Monroe Neighborhood Street Design Plan. Monroe connects downtown Milwaukie with new Orange Line MAX light rail, northwest Clackamas County and the Clackamas Town Center. Bike Milwaukie, a local bike advocacy group (along with help from the Bicycle Transportation Alliance) recently pushed through a neighborhood greenway plan for inner parts of Monroe Street.

This will be the second year in a row that the City used Sunday Parkways to help introduce the community to a new bridge over the Willamette River. Last year’s marquee event featured the brand new Tilikum Crossing Bridge.

Learn more at PortlandSundayParkways.org.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

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The post City’s newest Sunday Parkways route heads to Milwaukie via Sellwood Bridge appeared first on BikePortland.org.

How Sunday Parkways helps bridge Portland’s racial divides (video)

How Sunday Parkways helps bridge Portland’s racial divides (video)

When I started getting seriously interested in bicycles a few years ago, I already knew they were pollution-free, cheap, healthy, quiet, nonlethal and space-efficient.

What threw me for a loop, when I was talking to other Portlanders who were already interested in bicycles, was that they kept talking about community. Biking (and walking, and public transit) connected them with their neighbors and surroundings in a way that driving can’t.

The idea, it turned out, is backed up by science.

This week, two of the first Portlanders who I first heard talking about this concept, Elly Blue and Joe Biel of local company Microcosm Publishing, released a compelling short video about Portland’s Sunday Parkways open-streets festival that captures the idea and its relationship with one of Portland’s longstanding challenges: racial segregation, both socially and spacially.

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Linda Ginenthal, the Portland Transportation Bureau staffer who created Sunday Parkways, is one of several community voices here explaining how it works.

The piece is especially powerful if you know that one of the people behind this video is Phyllis Porter, a Seattle-based biking advocate who has been a force behind her city’s effort (so far with mixed success) to replicate Sunday Parkways there. Porter, who is black and lives in Seattle’s racially diverse Rainier Valley district, can be heard conducting some of the interviews.

This video (which actually premiered online yesterday on Seattle Bike Blog) is the latest in Microcosm’s Groundswell film series highlighting underappreciated participants the national biking movement. We covered an earlier Portland-based piece in the series here, and you can check out the full series so far here.

— Michael Andersen, (503) 333-7824 – michael@bikeportland.org


The post How Sunday Parkways helps bridge Portland’s racial divides (video) appeared first on BikePortland.org.

Portland wins bid to host 2016 National Open Streets Summit

Portland wins bid to host 2016 National Open Streets Summit

openstreetslead

Hot off the presses!
(Photo by Linda Ginenthal)

Next August the open streets movement will come to Portland.

Over the weekend we heard the news that Portland has been granted the right to host the 2016 National Open Streets Summit. Bureau of Transportation staffer Linda Ginenthal attended the 2015 event in Atlanta, Georgia over the weekend and shared the news with us yesterday after she flew back to oversee Sunday Parkways.

2016 will be third annual Open Streets Summit. The event is organized by the non-profit Open Streets Project in partnership with DC-based advocacy group the Alliance for Biking and Walking. The goal of the event is to bring together national and international leaders working to implement events like Portland’s Sunday Parkways, where streets are “opened” to people and closed to auto use. The Atlanta event over the weekend drew 125 leaders in the movement. The first summit was held in Los Angeles in 2014.

In the past 5-10 years, the number of open streets events in North America has skyrocketed. Portland got on the bandwagon in 2008 and today there are over 90 similar events across the continent.

Ginenthal said the 2016 Summit in Portland will take place in early August. Attendees will get the chance to attend both Bridge Pedal and the August Sunday Parkways event, as well as a host of professional development workshops and plenary speeches by notables in the field.

The last time Portland played host to an event like this was in 2008 when we were chosen to host the Towards Carfree Cities conference.

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Sunday Parkways in June 2011.
(Photo © J. Maus/BikePortland)

In some ways that event helped pave the way for Sunday Parkways in Portland. It was most memorable for the rousing speech given by Gil Peñalosa, former commissioner of Parks, Sport, and Recreation for the city of Bogotá, Colombia and current executive director of 8-80 Cities. Peńalosa gave Portland a reality check on its complacency and told us, “The reality is that Portland is far from being great, you have to realize that.”

Ginenthal was at that event and it’s no mystery that Bogotá’s famous Ciclovía events inspired her and her PBOT colleagues to start Sunday Parkways.

It was Gil’s brother, former Bogotá Mayor Enrique Peñalosa who told a Portland crowd nearly nine years ago that it all comes down to “cars versus people.”

“The essence of the conflict today, really, is cars versus people,” he said during an event at the Bagdad Theater on SE Hawthorne. “We can have a city that is very friendly to cars, or a city that is very friendly to people. We cannot have both.”

Is Portland ready to follow the lead of other great cities like Oslo and Paris who are starting to wrestle their downtowns away from automobiles and back to people? Will 2016 finally be the year that Portland decides to take Sunday Parkways to the next level and route the event on major streets and thoroughfares?

With Portland once again looking to regain our momentum around biking and walking after years of silence from City Hall and the period of stagnation that followed, this summit next year could be coming at a perfect time. We’ll also be in the heat of a mayoral race where it appears (so far at least) as if both candidates are trying to outdo each other when it comes to progressive transportation policies.

— Stay tuned for more details on the 2016 National Open Streets Summit.


The post Portland wins bid to host 2016 National Open Streets Summit appeared first on BikePortland.org.

A spectacular end to the Sunday Parkways season

A spectacular end to the Sunday Parkways season

splead2

(Photos © J. Maus/BikePortland)

The City of Portland says the 2015 Sunday Parkways season will break all previous records for attendance, so it’s fitting that it came to an end on a near-perfect day.

Thousands of people came out on bikes and on their own two feet to enjoy blue skies, cool and sunny temperatures, and the first-ever (and likely the last) Sunday Parkways to use the carfree Tilikum Bridge.

Sunday Parkways September 2015-37.jpg

Typical Sunday Parkways routes are one big loop, but with the Tilikum opening just a few weeks ago it was hard for organizers to resist including it in their plans. So today’s ride looped through Westmoreland and Sellwood neighborhoods and then had a long northern spur along the new Orangle Line and up onto the bridge.

Sounds like a great idea, except for the fact that TriMet buses, MAX and streetcar were all on their normal schedules. That alone is no big deal, but when you consider that TriMet is already extremely worried about collisions between path users and trains in inner southeast, you can imagine their stress level today with thousands of Sunday Parkways attendees dawdling around the tracks. I heard from sources that TriMet initially wanted PBOT to use only the north side of the Tilikum path because they didn’t want people to attempt to cross over the tracks at the west end. Then PBOT posted a message to Facebook encouraging people to park their bikes on the east end of the bridge and walk across in order to “keep the congestion down.”

The bridge and traffic along the Orange Line from OMSI to the Brooklyn Neighborhood was packed all day. But a few bottlenecks are a small price to pay for such a great event. Going slow was interesting because it gave me a time to chat with people and watch how the new bikeways, signals and crossings were being used. That being said, I think in the future it might be smarter for them to use larger streets and arterials instead of funneling everyone on narrow paths.

But, I digress… Back to today’s adventures…

Before we started the ride I met up with one Portlander who had never done a Sunday Parkways before. His name is Ted Wheeler. Wheeler, whose currently serving as Oregon State Treasurer and who would like to become Portland’s mayor, showed up to the event with his nine-year-old daughter. Wheeler said he and his family don’t ride in the city. He’s an “avid cyclist” who competes in triathlons and only gets out on the road in the pre-dawn hours because he “doesn’t like to mingle with traffic.” In many ways, he and his daughter are the embodiment of what open streets events are all about: a way to experience city streets on a bike without the threat of dangerous driving.

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Ted Wheeler.
Sunday Parkways September 2015-7.jpg

Looking around at all the other families on bikes rolling by us, Wheeler remarked at how the event impacts our city. “It just shows what the greenway potential is, in terms of bringing the community together, getting people outside, getting people to mingle, and really humanizing our built environment.”

The built environment had plenty of humans in it today that’s for sure…

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After rolling through the paths along the Orange Line and then the tree-lined streets of the Brooklyn neighborhood, we stopped at Westmoreland Park for lunch. Along the way we grabbed some fresh veggies from a free pile and scored some fruit thanks to BikeLoudPDX’s “banana handup” at the top of a little hill.

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Thanks Tom!
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I spotted Mayor Hales at the park. He was proudly sporting the very first of Nutcase’s eagerly-anticipated new helmet featuring the Portland flag.

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Mayor Hales.

I always love seeing familiar faces along the road. It’s my favorite part of Sunday Parkways. I talked to tons of old and new friends today.

Here’s Citybikes founder Tim Calvert (who is no longer with the cooperative) riding his trademark tall-bike full of pannier buckets he makes and sells…

Sunday Parkways September 2015-21.jpg

This is Angel York, a dedicated volunteer who helps several local bike organizations, including Bike Farm and BikePortland (she’s helping us with our birthday party this Friday!)…

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Also ran into this very talented duo: Sprocket Podcast co-host Aaron Flores (L) and consumate activist and musician Dan Kaufman…

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And this is BikeLoudPDX volunteer Emily Guise and her friend with their matching Bike Fridays. Sooo cute…

Sunday Parkways September 2015-35.jpg

PBOT’s Sunday Parkways CEO (not officialy title) Linda Ginenthal overseeing another successful event. She’s extra-happy because of some news we’ll share on the Front Page Monday morning.

The sweetest thing of the day (literally and figuratively) were these two young ladies selling bicycling-inspired cookies and rice krispie treats…

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Free piles are a time-honored Portland tradition, but a free car? That was a first for me:

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“As is. You haul.”

Another first was spotting this cool little dude on the new mural at SE 8th and Division. I think I found my spirit animal…

Sunday Parkways September 2015-36.jpg

Hope everyone had fun out there today. Thanks to the City of Portland, the volunteers and everyone who makes this event tick. We’re already looking forward to next year.


The post A spectacular end to the Sunday Parkways season appeared first on BikePortland.org.

A spectacular end to the Sunday Parkways season

A spectacular end to the Sunday Parkways season

splead2

(Photos © J. Maus/BikePortland)

The City of Portland says the 2015 Sunday Parkways season will break all previous records for attendance, so it’s fitting that it came to an end on a near-perfect day.

Thousands of people came out on bikes and on their own two feet to enjoy blue skies, cool and sunny temperatures, and the first-ever (and likely the last) Sunday Parkways to use the carfree Tilikum Bridge.

Sunday Parkways September 2015-37.jpg

Typical Sunday Parkways routes are one big loop, but with the Tilikum opening just a few weeks ago it was hard for organizers to resist including it in their plans. So today’s ride looped through Westmoreland and Sellwood neighborhoods and then had a long northern spur along the new Orangle Line and up onto the bridge.

Sounds like a great idea, except for the fact that TriMet buses, MAX and streetcar were all on their normal schedules. That alone is no big deal, but when you consider that TriMet is already extremely worried about collisions between path users and trains in inner southeast, you can imagine their stress level today with thousands of Sunday Parkways attendees dawdling around the tracks. I heard from sources that TriMet initially wanted PBOT to use only the north side of the Tilikum path because they didn’t want people to attempt to cross over the tracks at the west end. Then PBOT posted a message to Facebook encouraging people to park their bikes on the east end of the bridge and walk across in order to “keep the congestion down.”

The bridge and traffic along the Orange Line from OMSI to the Brooklyn Neighborhood was packed all day. But a few bottlenecks are a small price to pay for such a great event. Going slow was interesting because it gave me a time to chat with people and watch how the new bikeways, signals and crossings were being used. That being said, I think in the future it might be smarter for them to use larger streets and arterials instead of funneling everyone on narrow paths.

But, I digress… Back to today’s adventures…

Before we started the ride I met up with one Portlander who had never done a Sunday Parkways before. His name is Ted Wheeler. Wheeler, whose currently serving as Oregon State Treasurer and who would like to become Portland’s mayor, showed up to the event with his nine-year-old daughter. Wheeler said he and his family don’t ride in the city. He’s an “avid cyclist” who competes in triathlons and only gets out on the road in the pre-dawn hours because he “doesn’t like to mingle with traffic.” In many ways, he and his daughter are the embodiment of what open streets events are all about: a way to experience city streets on a bike without the threat of dangerous driving.

Sunday Parkways September 2015-2.jpg

Ted Wheeler.
Sunday Parkways September 2015-7.jpg

Looking around at all the other families on bikes rolling by us, Wheeler remarked at how the event impacts our city. “It just shows what the greenway potential is, in terms of bringing the community together, getting people outside, getting people to mingle, and really humanizing our built environment.”

The built environment had plenty of humans in it today that’s for sure…

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After rolling through the paths along the Orange Line and then the tree-lined streets of the Brooklyn neighborhood, we stopped at Westmoreland Park for lunch. Along the way we grabbed some fresh veggies from a free pile and scored some fruit thanks to BikeLoudPDX’s “banana handup” at the top of a little hill.

Sunday Parkways September 2015-15.jpg

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Thanks Tom!
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I spotted Mayor Hales at the park. He was proudly sporting the very first of Nutcase’s eagerly-anticipated new helmet featuring the Portland flag.

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Mayor Hales.

I always love seeing familiar faces along the road. It’s my favorite part of Sunday Parkways. I talked to tons of old and new friends today.

Here’s Citybikes founder Tim Calvert (who is no longer with the cooperative) riding his trademark tall-bike full of pannier buckets he makes and sells…

Sunday Parkways September 2015-21.jpg

This is Angel York, a dedicated volunteer who helps several local bike organizations, including Bike Farm and BikePortland (she’s helping us with our birthday party this Friday!)…

Sunday Parkways September 2015-22.jpg

Also ran into this very talented duo: Sprocket Podcast co-host Aaron Flores (L) and consumate activist and musician Dan Kaufman…

Sunday Parkways September 2015-28.jpg

Sunday Parkways September 2015-17.jpg

And this is BikeLoudPDX volunteer Emily Guise and her friend with their matching Bike Fridays. Sooo cute…

Sunday Parkways September 2015-35.jpg

PBOT’s Sunday Parkways CEO (not officialy title) Linda Ginenthal overseeing another successful event. She’s extra-happy because of some news we’ll share on the Front Page Monday morning.

The sweetest thing of the day (literally and figuratively) were these two young ladies selling bicycling-inspired cookies and rice krispie treats…

Sunday Parkways September 2015-23.jpg

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Free piles are a time-honored Portland tradition, but a free car? That was a first for me:

Sunday Parkways September 2015-27.jpg

“As is. You haul.”

Another first was spotting this cool little dude on the new mural at SE 8th and Division. I think I found my spirit animal…

Sunday Parkways September 2015-36.jpg

Hope everyone had fun out there today. Thanks to the City of Portland, the volunteers and everyone who makes this event tick. We’re already looking forward to next year.


The post A spectacular end to the Sunday Parkways season appeared first on BikePortland.org.

County urges bikers to use TriMet as wildfire smoke shuts down Portland’s streets

County urges bikers to use TriMet as wildfire smoke shuts down Portland’s streets

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This is what downtown #pdx looks like from about 1/2 mile away. #thisisclimatechange #pdxtst pic.twitter.com/rXR7FGRgoW

— Leslie Carlson (@QueenLeslie1982) August 22, 2015

Will tomorrow be the first Sunday Parkways postponed on account of global climate change? It could happen.

Portland’s streets are eerily empty tonight as the massive wildfires east of the Cascades send their smoke west into the city.

The yellowish haze was so bad by Saturday afternoon that Multnomah County urged people to use TriMet rather than biking or “at the very least, drink more H2O.”

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Bike riders: consider taking @trimet today. Air quality is unhealthy for all. At the very least, drink more H2O. http://t.co/CWYzfpVyv0

— Multnomah County, OR (@multco) August 22, 2015

It’s not an idle concern. Until I read Portland State University student Alex Bigazzi’s award-winning research into pollution inhalation among bike users, it had never occurred to me that people biking are at more risk from dirty air than people driving, because they’re breathing harder and ingesting more particulates per second.

Ordinarily, the other health benefits of biking outweigh the harm from increased pollution. But an especially bad day like today may be one of the rare days when biking is not good for your health.

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Here is some information and advice released at 6 p.m. Saturday from the state Department of Environmental Quality:

Conditions will likely remain very poor overnight, possibly becoming worse, until Sunday afternoon, when winds are expected to shift and blow the smoke out of the region. The wildfire smoke may increase the risk of illness, especially for older adults, young children, and people with asthma, respiratory, or heart conditions.

Should smoke occur, residents can take the following precautions to avoid breathing problems or other symptoms from smoke:

– Be aware of smoke concentrations in your area and avoid the places with highest concentrations.

– You can avoid smoke by staying indoors, closing all windows and doors and using an air filter that removes very fine particulate matter.
Avoid strenuous outdoor activity in smoky conditions.

– If you have heart disease, asthma or other lung disease, or are over 65 years of age, you have a higher risk of illness from wildfire smoke. Small children and pregnant women are also at increased risk. People in any of these groups might consider leaving the area until air quality improves.

– People suffering from asthma or other respiratory problems should follow their breathing management plans or contact their healthcare providers. Remember, local smoke levels can rise and fall rapidly, depending on weather factors including wind direction. People can conduct a visual assessment of smoke levels to quickly get a sense of air quality levels and take precautions. If people have additional concerns, they should contact the nearest regional or local public health agency for the latest in health conditions from smoke. Visit the Oregon Smoke Blog for more information regarding active fires and air quality, along with tools to help people assess smoke levels in their area. Check out the Air Quality Index for current conditions.

This is especially unpleasant timing because tomorrow is Southeast Portland Sunday Parkways from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. We’ve asked city officials to let us know if there are any changes of plans or precautions related to smoke, and will update here as we know.

Want to know the most upsetting part of today’s weather, and about the forest fires that have become standard features of summer in the West? Airborne soot itself is one of the atmosphere’s most powerful greenhouse agents.

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Went on a bike ride in the gorge today, smoke from wildfires was so thick you could barely see the river :[

A photo posted by Bridget Underwood (@bridgitiri) on


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