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The Monday Roundup: Holy spokes, scofflaw study, N-why-PD?, and more

The Monday Roundup: Holy spokes, scofflaw study, N-why-PD?, and more

This week’s Monday Roundup is sponsored by The eBike Store, Portland’s exclusive dealer of the BuddyRider dog carrier.

Here are the most noteworthy stories we came across last week…

The NYPD strikes again: Seems like every time I check my news feed there’s another example of how police in New York City just don’t get it. This time they’ve confiscated hundreds of “illegal” e-bikes used by the city’s droves of food delivery workers. WTH?

Holier-than-thou: A religious leader in Boston has found what many biking veterans have — a deeper spirituality and stronger connection to place — since she started biking to church. She’s even written a book about it.

Portland loves auto parking: The DJC has a good roundup of all the auto parking projects the City of Portland and Portland Development Commission are poised to spend millions on this year.

Bike share revolution in China: Beijing, once a bicycle capital of the world, was overrun with cars in recent decades. Now bikes are coming back thanks to high-tech bike share systems.

Ofo leading the charge: Ever hear of Ofo? It’s a Chinese bike-sharing company that’s valued at over a billion dollars and just got a visit from Apple CEO Tim Cook.

Studying scofflaws: A major study found that people generally break traffic laws while cycling just to stay alive — not to be jerks.

Trump’s budget and bikes: The League of American Bicyclists breaks it down. It’s not all bad, but it’s pretty bad. Let’s hope this thing goes the way of his health care plan.








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Silicon Valley’s bike vision: Some heavy-hitters in the tech world are behind a new vision for better bicycling in the Silicon Valley.

It’ll take more than a vision: A report by the Silicon Valley Bicycle Coalition found that people won’t try cycling because they feel auto users drive too dangerously.

World-class fast: USA Cycling (America’s governing body of racing) wants to be the best in the world — with a focus on their women’s teams and BMX.

Not that AAA: Vancouver, Canada has just released an inspiring new set of bicycle facility design guidelines that put the focus squarely on “All ages and abilities” or AAA.

Bikeway debate in NZ: Small market owners in New Zealand blame a bikeway for the demise of their business because it took away auto parking.

Take risks: Los Angeles DOT leader Seleta Reynolds is a breath of fresh air in the transportation reform world.

They’re loud too: Cars: They pollute our air, they are used as weapons by terrorists, they turn people into assholes, they kill 40,000+ people every year, they take up way too much space in our cities and towns — and they also make too much damn noise.

— Jonathan Maus: (503) 706-8804, @jonathan_maus on Twitter and jonathan@bikeportland.org

BikePortland is supported by the community (that means you!). Please become a subscriber or make a donation today.





The post The Monday Roundup: Holy spokes, scofflaw study, N-why-PD?, and more appeared first on BikePortland.org.

The Monday Roundup: Freeway removals, car abuse costs, bike use savings, transit haters, and more

The Monday Roundup: Freeway removals, car abuse costs, bike use savings, transit haters, and more

Copenhagen Day 2

Bikes now outnumber cars in Copenhagen.
(Photo: J. Maus/BikePortland))

I know all you can think about is the election. But you should probably take a break and get caught up on the best bike-related stories we came across last week…

Hales sees the light: Remember that no good, horrible, very bad decision Mayor Charlie Hales made in 2013 to enact parking minimums on new residential development? Now he wants to remove them.

Seattleites are over I-5: This article about removing I-5 through Seattle could be — should be! — written about Portland. That freeway sucks and has no business bisecting our central city.

More freeway removal: The city of Rochester in upstate New York filled in a central city freeway with dirt, “to focus on pedestrians and establish vital neighborhoods for housing, expanding businesses and producing jobs.”

As goes Los Angeles, so goes…: A ballot measure in Los Angeles would raise big money ($42 Billion) for light rail. The LA Times has a great rundown on that and a general overview of the non-driving transportation mix in the driving capital of America.

SoCal transit haters: To give you an idea of what L.A.’s transportation reformers are up against, check out these bus-hating Venice residents fought against a new bus route through their neighborhood and then celebrating victory with a tasteless piñata.

“Safe mobility” not “Vision Zero”: The California city of Santa Ana is not just boldly breaking from their County’s auto-centric policies, their new plan to eliminate traffic collisions is called “Safe Mobility” instead of the more popular and well-known “Vision Zero”.







Biking on main street: It’s simple: Backstreet and “neighborhood greenways” aren’t enough. If we want to be a real cycling city, we must make it safe and easy to bike on main commercial streets. But don’t take my word for it, check out the analysis by Michael Andersen.

The cost of car abuse: A new report has found that a whopping half of all injuries treated at a major hospital in San Francisco were from traffic collisions — and the cost to treat them was $105.5 million over two years.

An eye for an eye: China’s traffic enforcement is not messing around when it comes to cracking down on people whose bright lights blind other road users.

Cool bikes in Detroit: The Guardian has a fun photo essay of the creatively customized bikes that roll on the streets of Detroit.

Put that money into bike lanes: A study published in the journal Injury Prevention found that New York City’s bike lane investments have led to “exceptionally good value because they simultaneously address multiple public health problems.” The study went so far as to say that spending money on bike lanes to improve health is, “more cost-effective than the majority of preventive approaches used today.” Bloomberg News also covered the study.

Copenhagen tipping poing: This line from Copenhagenize says it all: “For the first time since the City starting counting traffic entering the city centre, there are more bikes than cars.”

Is it really that complicated?: Not sure to smile or cry at the news that the state DOT in Colorado is having such a hard time preventing vulnerable users from being hit and killed on their roads they’re willing to pay the public for new ideas.

Drop us a line if you come across a great article and want us to consider sharing it in next week’s roundup.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

BikePortland is supported by the community (that means you!). Please become a subscriber or make a donation today.

The post The Monday Roundup: Freeway removals, car abuse costs, bike use savings, transit haters, and more appeared first on BikePortland.org.

The Monday Roundup: Planning while black, housing for cars, free bikes, sexism, and more

The Monday Roundup: Planning while black, housing for cars, free bikes, sexism, and more

We've reached peak car abuse epidemic.

We’ve reached peak car abuse epidemic.

LPI to LBI ASAP: New York City is eyeing a very sensible new law — it would allow bicycle riders to join walkers and other rollers to get a head-start at intersections via the “leading pedestrian interval” (LPI).

Fair? I’ll tell what’s fair!: We’ve all heard, “You damn bicyclists need to pay your fair share!” But how much is that exactly? Well, Streets.mn tried to find out.

Insights from a fellow roller: Remember Ian Mackay? He stopped in Portland on a 300+ mile ride on his wheelchair to raise awareness for good paths. Here are his final thoughts on the journey.

Transportation access and Black Lives Matter: An interview with two activists in Chicago illuminates how transportation activism intersects with our modern civil rights struggle.

Planning while black: Los Angeles bike advocate Tamika Butler challenged the planning profession to do a gut-check when it comes to race and privilege in her keynote speech at the recent NACTO conference in Seattle.

Biking up in Big Apple: A report from the New York City health authority says bike use is up throughout the city.







Straight dope on “infrastructure” spending: This very timely Bloomberg piece debunks some of the conventional political “wisdom” about “infrastructure spending.” It’s a must-read as Oregon leaders debate a transportation funding package.

A roof over your car’s roof: We’ve been covering the housing-for-cars phenomenon for months now and it looks to finally be going national. Bloomberg reports that the U.S. is building more three-car garages than one-room apartments.

San Diego, just like Portland: The California city of San Diego is at the opposite end of the west coast, but when it comes to the struggle of growth, land-use policy and transportation reform, we seem to have a lot in common.

Laws against “distracted walking”: Why don’t we have a general ban on unsafe use of the roads instead of continuing to debate and pass specific laws about distraction? I don’t care what you’re doing, if it’s unsafe, I want a cop to be able to cite (or arrest) for it.

Free bikes!: A teacher in a low-income area of South Carolina wants to buy all 650 students in her class a new bike. She’s already raised over $40,000 of her $65,000 goal.

Car abuse impacts: This is what we talk about when we talk about the negative impact car abuse has on our lives.

Out of control: Did you catch this KATU article about a place in southeast Portland where cars “careening” off the road is relatively common? Sheesh.

Cycling sexism: The former technical director of British Cycling seems to have told a female athlete to “go and have a baby” after he declined to renew her contract.

That’ll do it for last week. Make sure to send us your suggestions if you want us to consider them for next Monday.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

BikePortland is supported by the community (that means you!). Please become a subscriber or make a donation today.

The post The Monday Roundup: Planning while black, housing for cars, free bikes, sexism, and more appeared first on BikePortland.org.

The Monday Roundup: Pool noodles, puke, parking and more

The Monday Roundup: Pool noodles, puke, parking and more

monround10-24

This week’s Monday Roundup is sponsored by the River City Bicycles Cyclocross Crusade, coming to Bend this weekend for spooky cyclocross shenanigans.

Just noodling along: The most emailed link we got from readers this week was about a guy in Toronto who uses a pool noodle to keep drivers off his back.

Latest bike share bike tech: Bike share bike maker BCycle’s newest rigs look pretty solid and offer tight integration with transit, turn-by-turn directions, and a big touchscreen in the cockpit.

Entitlement and fear: A surprisingly comprehensive and concise look at traffic culture problems and how to fix them, including, “Emphasizing intervehicle etiquette in driver’s education programs,” and the “emotional side of driving.”

Sweet dreams, wealthy folks: What happens when researchers meld commute patterns and income levels? We find out even more about how privilege impacts daily life.

Flying light: We’re not exactly sure what the applications of a drone-mounted bike light would be — but we’re intrigued by the idea.

Non-motorized drone: Keeping on this same topic, if you’ve been wanting to get sweet aerial footage of your bike adventures, this new “Birdie” product is a parachute for your camera.

Chicago’s latest: Take a ride on a new protected bike lane in downtown Chicago.

Free parking costs a lot: Not a new idea, but City Observatory has a great explainer about the strong correlation between the cost of parking and how people choose to get to work.







Bike share for all: Bay Area Bike Share announced a solid plan for low-income residents: the ability to pay with cash and a first-year membership of just $5. Their system is operated by Motivate, the same company in charge of Portland’s fleet. Even so, our low-income plan has yet to launch.

Bike share for free: Despite urban legends about theft and vandalism, two small cities in Minnesota are proving that free bike programs can actually work.

A fifth for cycling: The United Nations says governments should spend at least 20 percent of transportation budgets on cycling. Hear that Governor Brown?

Future of Portland housing: Here’s everything you need to know about the City of Portland’s Residential Infill Project (written by some guy named Michael Andersen).

Irrelevance defined: What better example could there be that the federal traffic engineering establishment is completely out of touch? They’ve given final approval of bike boxes — a mere eight years after cities started installing them.

Slow for stimuli: These are tough times for the “E” of enforcement. It’s facing concerns about racial profiling, and now there’s a growing awareness that what really thwarts speeding and reckless driving 24/7 is more thoughtful road design. Specifically roads with more stimuli and narrower lanes.

Gag me with a u-lock: A San Francisco-based entrepreneur fed up with bike thieves has blown through his crowdfunding goal with “SkunkLock” — a vomit-inducing u-lock.

Uber education: In the, well-good-they-need-it category, Uber has released a series of videos to help train their drivers about cycling laws and the rights of people who ride. Videos based in Portland are likely coming soon.

Driving skills problem: Been thinking lately that we don’t have a “traffic safety” problem or a “bike safety” problem in this country; we have a driving skills problem. Too many people simply suck at driving and they are crashing into other people and other objects more than ever.

Thanks to everyone who sent in links this week.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

BikePortland is supported by the community (that means you!). Please become a subscriber or make a donation today.

The post The Monday Roundup: Pool noodles, puke, parking and more appeared first on BikePortland.org.

The Monday Roundup: Carfree holy day, six-foot traffic cone, bikes on trains, and more

The Monday Roundup: Carfree holy day, six-foot traffic cone, bikes on trains, and more

monroundup

This week’s Monday Roundup is brought to you by our friends at Bicycle Fitting Services, who reminds you that it’s the perfect time of year to dial-in your fit for maximum power and comfort.

Here are the best stories we came across last week:

Bike valet at the train station: Great news from Amtrak: You can now simply check your bicycle as luggage on the Coast Starlight route which goes from L.A. to Seattle.

Utrecht makes it look easy: This transformation of a street in the Dutch city of Utrecht shows the pinnacle of people-centered design. And yes, it unabashedly comes at the expense of space for driving.

An opportunity for cargo bikes?: Good news: University of Washington now has a corporate-funded Urban Freight Lab to figure out more efficient urban, last-mile deliveries. Bad news: The word “bike” doesn’t appear in the article and “drones” and “autonomous vehicles” does.

Perspective on “inner cities”: After an awkward moment in the second presidential debate, The Black Urbanist Kristin Jeffers lays out some important perspective about who lives where (and why).

Best traffic cone evah: The City of Bozeman is sick and tired of people speeding through a certain intersection so they got creative and installed a six-foot high traffic cone. It’s working.

Build where collisions happen: Strong Towns makes the case for using collision maps to inform where to build bikeways. We do this to some extent already, but the collision dataset is woefully incomplete.

Holy mobility: On Yom Kippur in Tel Aviv people know intuitively that driving just isn’t the right thing to do. So they all ride bikes instead and the city becomes a “playground.”







Race promotion needs help: We’ve been intrigued by local signs that it’s getting hard for race promoters to make a living. Turns out it’s also a national problem.

Research on collisions: “Male cyclists, with all else being equal, were less likely than female cyclists to be involved in conflicts and dangerous conflicts at the studied intersections.”

Road safety in Canada: A spike in traffic deaths and injuries to bikers and walker isn’t just an American thing. CBC News in Canada cites an urban planner who says their 2016 stats so far show the rate of people driving into other, more vulnerable roadway users has reached “public health epidemic” levels.

Walk and you will die: A business group in downtown Pittsburgh has found a way to kill their business: They’ve paid to have someone in a grim reaper costume walk around and “educate pedestrians” about safety.

Messenger ride-along: It’s always fun to learn the inner-workings of a bike delivery professional.

Epic bike share defense: NYC Council Member Brad Lander absolutely crushed this written response to people who don’t want Citibike bike share stations in Park Slope.

Too wide to ride: This is a scary trend in trail management: Forest Service in Colorado drastically widened former singletrack in the name of “safety for all users.” Barf.

Robin Williams’ legacy: We knew Robin Williams loved bikes, but we had no idea he had such a remarkable collection. And now it’s being auctioned off.

Thank you Denver: This article reads like it came right out of my own dreams. Instead of investing in old technology of parking garages, the City of Denver is making sure any new ones can be easily retrofitted for other uses once private cars become passé.

Read a bike-related story worth sharing? Drop us a line and we’ll consider it for next week’s roundup.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

BikePortland is supported by the community (that means you!). Please become a subscriber or make a donation today.

The post The Monday Roundup: Carfree holy day, six-foot traffic cone, bikes on trains, and more appeared first on BikePortland.org.

The Monday Roundup: Hand signals, glowing bikeways, safety vigilantes, and more

The Monday Roundup: Hand signals, glowing bikeways, safety vigilantes, and more

Solar "Dutch style" bikeways at an intersection on Texas A & M campus.(Photo: Texas A & M Transportation Institute)

Solar “Dutch style” bikeways at an intersection on Texas A & M campus.
(Photo: Texas A & M Transportation Institute)

This week’s Monday Roundup is brought to you by Bicycle Fitting Services, who reminds you that it’s the perfect time of year to dial-in your fit for maximum power and comfort.

_

Welcome to the week. Before we get started, here are the best stories we came across last week…

Onion on arm signals: If you need a quick laugh after last night’s depressing presidential debate, check out The Onion’s treatment of hand signals.

USDOT talks tough on Vision Zero: But it’s mostly just talk. Still. A big show was made of federal commitment to road safety, but we’re not holding our breath that they have the guts to do what it takes to really tackle the problem.

Begging for change: A man waited 26 minutes for a “walk” signal in Seattle. Thankfully he recorded it and shamed SDOT into examining the cause of the delay.

Water taxis gaining steam: NYC is planning one and now another one has been approved between San Francisco and Berkeley. Can you imagine a water taxi connecting St. Johns and north Portland to the South Waterfront and downtown?

Same roads, different rules: The headline to this piece in the LA Times says everything you need to know. And our response to it is a resounding, “Yes!”.

“Dutch Junction” in Texas: Texas A & M University just completed what they call the first “Dutch-style” non-signalized intersection in the U.S. Oh, and it has solar luminescent green coloring.

Poland’s glowing bike lane: Luminescent bike lanes are apparently a thing right now. Not to be outdone by Texas, Poland has a new bikeway that glows blue after sunset.

Dealing with Portland growth: Randy Gragg absolutely nails this piece about Portland’s astounding growth and how to deal with it.

Design cities for maximum access: Designing post-highway era cities requires more than simply replacing highways with light rail (which is what many cities are doing now). “Each community must define accessibility on its own terms,” says Next City.

Uber, don’t mess with public transit: Jarrett Walker of Human Transit is a man after our own hearts. His response to an Uber ad that insulted public transit was spot-on. You can replace public transit with bicycling in his explanation and it applies just the same.









Carnage ticker: It’s good to see the horrible trend for U.S. road safety make national headlines. It’d be even better if we took real steps to get control of it.

Bikeways don’t cause traffic: We heard it in the Better Naito debate and it’ll be brought up a lot as Portland deals with its congestion problem. Here’s a piece in The Guardian that dispels the myth.

White, black and biking all over: Portlander Elly Blue has come out with a second edition of her great Bikenomics book. She published an excerpt in YES! Magazine titled, “Why Bicycle Justice Isn’t a White Guy in Spandex.”

Carfree NYC?: New York City May Bill De Blasio is floating the idea of prohibiting driving on a major Manhattan thoroughfare to improve road access for other users during a shutdown of a major subway line.

Bike theft prevention success in BC: A focused effort to reduce bike theft on Granville Island, a popular destination in downtown Vancouver BC, is working.

Safety vigilantism: San Franscisco is the latest city where citizen activists have erected unsanctioned bike lane protection because they’re fed up with city government that isn’t doing enough to make streets safe…

… And oh look, it worked: The City of San Francisco will let the unsanctioned plastic posts stay, “until it follows with its own set of permanent change.”

Trek president gets political: John Burke, President of Trek Bicycles, seems to have a political career on his mind. He took to Huffington Post last week to share the 10 questions he’s like to ask our presidential candidates.

Bicycles as political tool: A group of “Kung-Fu trained feminist nuns” is on a ride through Nepal to bring an end to human trafficking.

Tweet of the Week: We’ve been hearing a lot about the vast increase in auto traffic on Portland roads. It’s a major issue with far-ranging impacts, one of which is described in the tweet below by Gwen Shaw:

Now, let’s get on with the week shall we?

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

BikePortland is supported by the community (that means you!). Please become a subscriber or make a donation today.

The post The Monday Roundup: Hand signals, glowing bikeways, safety vigilantes, and more appeared first on BikePortland.org.

The Monday Roundup: Racial justice, gift of biking, drugs, cafe on wheels, and more

The Monday Roundup: Racial justice, gift of biking, drugs, cafe on wheels, and more

monround-10-3

Before we get started on this week’s best links from around the web, we want to give a special thanks to the Handmade Bike & Beer Festival for their advertising support and sponsorship of the Monday Roundup. The fest, now in its 9th year, happens this Friday and Saturday (10/7-8) in north Portland. Join me at the Base Camp Brewing tent to sample the fresh hop ale made with hops we picked up by bike!

Now, on with the best stories we came across this past week…

Terminator privilege: When it comes to selective enforcement, there’s white privilege and then there’s celebrity privilege. When movie star Arnold Schwarzenegger got stopped for cycling in a train station he got away scot-free by promising to take a selfie with the cop.

Commuting gift: Police in southern California met a teen who walked five hours to work — so they bought him a bike.

Bodies on bikes: Streetsblog L.A. writer Sahra Sulaiman has this week’s must-read on equity. It’s about the imperative need for mobility advocates to shift away from a bike-centric perspective and replace it with one that puts human existence and experience — what she calls the bodies on the bikes — at the top. Oh, and don’t dismiss racial justice when discussing transportation policy.

Cafe on wheels: We get a lot of pitches for bike-related crowdfunding campaigns. This one stood out for its impressive ambition about what a bike-based business can be: a turnkey cafe!

Zero vision, zero access: A proposal from the mayor of London would rate large trucks for safety (based on how well the driver can see other road users) and ban the most dangerous ones from entering the city center.

Driving is for old people: Like it or not we’re entering a new era of driving. Here’s an interesting perspective from young kids who might grow up to never know a world where humans got behind the wheel.

Counting what counts: Our friends at City Observatory put Placemeter, a new road user counting technology, to the test. Their verdict: It looks very promising.

Transit in LA: This seems like good news. A light rail line that goes between downtown Los Angeles and Santa Monica has been such a smash hit (reaching 70% of its ridership level) that new cars are being added to deal with overcrowding.







Expanded distraction enforcement: 10 years after California passed its first law to battle cell phone use while driving they have now widened the reach of the law.

When infrastructure expansion is good: In New York City a new policy proposal would allow the DOT to expand sidewalks in order to handle the human congestion.

When infrastructure expansion is bad: Then there’s the Oregon DOT, which celebrates the overdue completion of a project that cost $365 million just to straighten 10 miles of a little-used rural highway.

Paris FTW: Paris is the New York City of Europe. They’re not afraid to enact real car control measures. When Paris closed two miles of waterfront highway along the Seine River, it turns out people just figured out other — non-driving — ways to get around. Imagine that!

Progress in NYC: New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio signed several new laws into the books that make his city a nicer place to walk and bike.

Drugged up racers: We’re not sure what was more disturbing; this Deadspin headline about pervasiveness of drug use in the pro cycling ranks, or the tweet about it by former pro Ryan Trebon.

Inspiration from Groningen: Don’t believe the hype that cars are a necessity in dense urban environments. If you need a pick-me-up after battling haters, check out this profile of Groningen and have your faith in bicycling restored.

Change culture, change streets: Here’s a good overview on why car-centric countries like the US and the UK got that way, why it’s so harmful, and how we can start working toward a different reality.

Thanks to readers Paul, Todd, Mark, Steve, Ron and Ted for the suggestions this week.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

BikePortland is supported by the community (that means you!). Please become a subscriber or make a donation today.

The post The Monday Roundup: Racial justice, gift of biking, drugs, cafe on wheels, and more appeared first on BikePortland.org.

The Monday Roundup: Racial justice, gift of biking, drugs, cafe on wheels, and more

The Monday Roundup: Racial justice, gift of biking, drugs, cafe on wheels, and more

monround-10-3

Before we get started on this week’s best links from around the web, we want to give a special thanks to the Handmade Bike & Beer Festival for their advertising support and sponsorship of the Monday Roundup. The fest, now in its 9th year, happens this Friday and Saturday (10/7-8) in north Portland. Join me at the Base Camp Brewing tent to sample the fresh hop ale made with hops we picked up by bike!

Now, on with the best stories we came across this past week…

Terminator privilege: When it comes to selective enforcement, there’s white privilege and then there’s celebrity privilege. When movie star Arnold Schwarzenegger got stopped for cycling in a train station he got away scot-free by promising to take a selfie with the cop.

Commuting gift: Police in southern California met a teen who walked five hours to work — so they bought him a bike.

Bodies on bikes: Streetsblog L.A. writer Sahra Sulaiman has this week’s must-read on equity. It’s about the imperative need for mobility advocates to shift away from a bike-centric perspective and replace it with one that puts human existence and experience — what she calls the bodies on the bikes — at the top. Oh, and don’t dismiss racial justice when discussing transportation policy.

Cafe on wheels: We get a lot of pitches for bike-related crowdfunding campaigns. This one stood out for its impressive ambition about what a bike-based business can be: a turnkey cafe!

Zero vision, zero access: A proposal from the mayor of London would rate large trucks for safety (based on how well the driver can see other road users) and ban the most dangerous ones from entering the city center.

Driving is for old people: Like it or not we’re entering a new era of driving. Here’s an interesting perspective from young kids who might grow up to never know a world where humans got behind the wheel.

Counting what counts: Our friends at City Observatory put Placemeter, a new road user counting technology, to the test. Their verdict: It looks very promising.

Transit in LA: This seems like good news. A light rail line that goes between downtown Los Angeles and Santa Monica has been such a smash hit (reaching 70% of its ridership level) that new cars are being added to deal with overcrowding.







Expanded distraction enforcement: 10 years after California passed its first law to battle cell phone use while driving they have now widened the reach of the law.

When infrastructure expansion is good: In New York City a new policy proposal would allow the DOT to expand sidewalks in order to handle the human congestion.

When infrastructure expansion is bad: Then there’s the Oregon DOT, which celebrates the overdue completion of a project that cost $365 million just to straighten 10 miles of a little-used rural highway.

Paris FTW: Paris is the New York City of Europe. They’re not afraid to enact real car control measures. When Paris closed two miles of waterfront highway along the Seine River, it turns out people just figured out other — non-driving — ways to get around. Imagine that!

Progress in NYC: New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio signed several new laws into the books that make his city a nicer place to walk and bike.

Drugged up racers: We’re not sure what was more disturbing; this Deadspin headline about pervasiveness of drug use in the pro cycling ranks, or the tweet about it by former pro Ryan Trebon.

Inspiration from Groningen: Don’t believe the hype that cars are a necessity in dense urban environments. If you need a pick-me-up after battling haters, check out this profile of Groningen and have your faith in bicycling restored.

Change culture, change streets: Here’s a good overview on why car-centric countries like the US and the UK got that way, why it’s so harmful, and how we can start working toward a different reality.

Thanks to readers Paul, Todd, Mark, Steve, Ron and Ted for the suggestions this week.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

BikePortland is supported by the community (that means you!). Please become a subscriber or make a donation today.

The post The Monday Roundup: Racial justice, gift of biking, drugs, cafe on wheels, and more appeared first on BikePortland.org.

The Monday Roundup: False equivalency, burnout baby, Jane Jacobs, and more

The Monday Roundup: False equivalency, burnout baby, Jane Jacobs, and more

jacongs

This week’s Monday Roundup is brought to you by the Oregon Handmade Bike & Beer Festival, coming your way October 7-8th.

Welcome to Monday! Here are the links and stories that caught our eyes last week…

‘Share the road’ is bullshit: This is hands-down the best thing on “share the road” we’ve ever read. “The legacy of ‘share the road’ is suppression of, and increased danger to, the less heavily-armed side of the sharing.”

Car culture down under: In Australia, burnout competitions are a serious thing (I know this from experience). And for one dad they are very serious. So much so that he has trained his five-year-old to do them on his own. Unfortunately for him that’s illegal and authorities have intervened.

Cultural values: A bike maker has started labeling their bike boxes as televisions in order to get better treatment from shippers.

Jane Jacobs get New Yorker’ed: Excellent writer Adam Gopnik takes a deep dive into the ideas and influences of famed urbanist Jane Jacobs — 54 years after her groundbreaking book was reviewed in the same magazine.

The science (and bike) guy: Corporate content like this rarely goes well, but we sort of like the video series Diamondback Bicycles has put together with Bill Nye, the “science guy.”

Edmonton can do it: The Canadian city has put forward a proposal for a “minimum grid” of protected bikeways in their downtown core. Portland has been working on this for years but still hasn’t released many details.

Chicago the “best” bike city? Yes Bicycling Magazine gave Chicago the #1 spot in their “Best Bike City” rankings. Streetsblog Chicago wonders if they deserved it.

Pedaling in the classroom: We all know some kids are healthier and smarter when they bike to school; but did you know the same might apply to biking in school?







They finally gave up: The ridiculous, five-year lawsuit against an innocent and successful bikeway in Brooklyn’s Park Slope neighbohood has finally been dropped.

Sweden supports DIY: In a bid to battle the throwaway economy and encourage a DIY ethic, the Swedish government will ease taxes on minor repairs of things like shoes and bicycles.

Open Streets boosted in L.A.: The Sunday Parkways equivalent in Los Angeles is being greatly expanded to 17 events.

Vision More Enforcement: This story from Chicago about how its Vision Zero plan could impact people of color is precisely why the City of Portland left increased police enforcement out of our plan.

Sneaky criminals: People will go to great lengths in order to maintain their illegal and dangerous use of cars — including James Bond-like gadgets that flip their license plates.

San Fran transformers: Another major U.S. city has sprouted an anonmyous group that creates unsanctioned bikeways and crosswalks. It’s another sign that governments and established advocacy groups are not moving fast enough to make streets safe.

High-end lights: It’s always a great sign when bike component makers are looking for new ways to integrate lights.

Oakland against auto parking: Auto parking ain’t what it used to be. Oakland’s City Council just blasted its minimum parking requirements.

Feds wants beds not cars: And in just-breaking news… Even the White House has just declared that auto parking requirements should be eliminated because they create an “undue burden” on development and disproportionately impact low-income households.

Defying the ban: Iranian women are heroically protesting their government’s ban on cycling by riding their bikes and posting photos to social media.

Read this, it’ll make us stronger: Charles Marohn of StrongTowns has a must-read about infrastructure spending that’s very relevant given that Oregon legislatures and leaders are gearing up for a big spending bill. He lays down some essential truths that should dictate the policy conversation. Bonus: Marohn is coming to Portland for a speaking event on October 3rd!

And finally, our Tweet of the Week goes to Street Trust Advocacy Director Gerik Kransky. After a Twitter conversation where I said “incrementalism is failure,” he posed this question:

If you come across a worthwhile article, please drop us a line and you might see it in next week’s roundup.

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

BikePortland is supported by the community (that means you!). Please become a subscriber or make a donation today.

The post The Monday Roundup: False equivalency, burnout baby, Jane Jacobs, and more appeared first on BikePortland.org.

The Monday Roundup: Carbon tax time, fast e-bikes, better blocks, best bike cities, and more

The Monday Roundup: Carbon tax time, fast e-bikes, better blocks, best bike cities, and more

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Welcome to the Monday Roundup, where we’ve gathered (with help from readers) the most interesting stories and links from the past week…

Nabbing unsafe passers: Police in Birmingham (UK) are riding bikes undercover-style to catch people who pass them too closely.

Chicago #1 Bike City: Bicycling Magazine’s new rankings are out and Chicago has earned the top spot. The magazine’s editors felt it was Chicago’s turn at the top in large part because of their progress on physically protected bike lanes. San Francisco is ranked second and Portland came in third.

Speaking of protected bike lanes: The NYC Dept. of Transportation has been under fire from advocates for not doing enough to make streets safe for bike riders, so they’re doing a media push to tout their record-setting pace of building 18-miles of protected bike lanes this year.

They got the wrong guy: A man who was biking in Brooklyn says he was assaulted physically and verbally (with a racial slur) by two people inside a car — but somehow he’s the one the night in jail.

Carbon tax goes mainstream: The time to start taxing people for how much carbon their vehicles emit has come, says the Washington Post Editorial Board.

Better blocks everywhere: Portland isn’t the only city where tactical urbanism — when citizens create temporary road re-designs — is taking off. NPR profiles the national trend with an eye on Burlington, Vermont.

No auto parking, no problem: Another local trend that’s happening nationwide is developers who opt out of including auto parking in housing projects.







Trebon retires: Professional racer and Portland resident Ryan Trebon has decided to retire from cyclocross and he gave an exit interview to VeloNews.

Backstreets and bike lanes are not a solution: We are in a post-bike-lane-only era — at least we should be. Curbed has a strong call for continuous protected bikeways on major streets as the solution to get more people riding more safely.

Unified strategy for a happy city: Copenhagen is once again showing the rest of the world how it’s done. This article in the Guardian details how officials break down government silos to create a comprehensive plan for citywide public health and happiness. If Portland attempted this, the public process would likely last for decades.

Good news in northeast: A 34-unit development on NE Killingsworth and 17th has been opened with help from a transit-oriented development grant from Metro.

Perspective is everything: Brooklyn Spoke expertly breaks down a weak answer from New York City’s mayor about people who park in bike lanes.

Fast e-bikes and the future: Yes, e-bikes can help people make the switch from driving to bike on long commutes; but at some point they are more akin to mopeds than bicycles and cities are starting to regulate them as such.

Our tweet of the week comes from author and Vision Zero expert Neil Arason:

— Jonathan Maus, (503) 706-8804 – jonathan@bikeportland.org

BikePortland is supported by the community (that means you!). Please become a subscriber or make a donation today.

The post The Monday Roundup: Carbon tax time, fast e-bikes, better blocks, best bike cities, and more appeared first on BikePortland.org.